Blackmoor and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £7.99
  • You Save: £1.67 (21%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Blackmoor has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Blackmoor Paperback – 2 Mar 2009


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£6.32
£0.01 £0.01
£6.32 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Blackmoor + Daylight Saving
Price For Both: £12.31

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (2 Mar 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847391265
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847391261
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 485,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Edward Hogan was born in Derby in 1980 and now lives in Brighton. He is a graduate of the MA creative writing course at UEA and a recipient of the David Higham Award. His first novel, Blackmoor, was shortlisted for the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award, the Dylan Thomas Prize and the Desmond Elliot Prize.

Product Description

Review

'No first novel I've read this year stays with me like Blackmoor by Edward Hogan... Hogan knows the terrain and the people, is wise beyond his years... and is a writer of great energy and fearsome powers of observation... Engaged, ambitious and deeply felt -- all the things a first novel should be. He is a writer of huge promise.' Hilary Mantel in the TLS 'There's a subtle magic to Hogan's prose, and a passionate concern for the part of the world where this novel is based, which invites comparison with D H Lawrence... [This novel] has confidence, mystery and an entrancing sense of itself' Independent on Sunday '[An] outstanding first novel... Hogan's writing is so forceful that the extraordinary elements of his plot are made utterly convincing, and more mundane aspects sparkle under his acute observation... The strength of the imagery supports the non-linear narrative; when the reasons behind the strange state of affairs are revealed, they slot into place with satisfying plausibility. But Hogan refrains from offering complete explanations of why things are as they are, a restraint which respects the complexity of the causes and effects that form individuals, families and communities, and the doubts that remain in the minds of the characters. In this powerful and sensitive novel, twenty-eight-year-old Hogan has achieved a striking debut' TLS 23/5 'Eloquent... unusual... will stay with you for a long time' Observer "An impassioned depiction of an intensely insular society choking on its own bile" Guardian "A debut novel of ambitious substance and style... writing which is charged with a bite and passion harking back to his Northern forebears: DH Lawrence, most obviously, with a passing touch, perhaps, of Charlotte Bronte. His figurative language is neatly imaginative... Hogan is a clearly a writer to watch" Independent 9/5/08 "Dead smart and heartbreaking... Offbeat and incredibly compelling. I love the way Edward Hogan writes" Miriam Toews, author of A Complicated Kindness "It's a long time since I've read such a powerful and confident first novel. Edward Hogan's voice is utterly distinctive: strong, emotive, haunting. His powers of observation seem almost supernatural... A major new talent" Hilary Mantel 'The only supernatural albino love story you'll ever need' Things that got us through last month... Arena April issue "The eloquent prose and unusual story will stay with you for a long time" Observer magazine 'The novel seeps into your mind like the subterranean gas beneath the village. It's hard to shake' Nottingham Evening Post 16/5 'Blackmoor is ambitious in both substance and style' Yorkshire Post 'A haunting tale of buried secrets and shattered lives set against the backdrop of Derbyshire's darkest days' Derby Evening Telegraph 'While the delivery is graceful, the sense of understated, growing menace is what really holds this book together... As everything else crumbles, the elements of [Vincent's] teenage world start to slot into place, bringing warmth to an already deeply felt novel' New Statesman, 16/6 'There's a subtle magic to Hogan's prose, and a passionate concern for the part of the world where this novel is based, which invites comparisons with D H Lawrence -- but that would be lazy... it has confidence, mystery and an entrancing sense of itself" 4 stars, Independent on Sunday 15/6 '[A] memorable debut novel... Blackmoor becomes a haunting study of losses which, like the firedamp accumulating in the pits, still threaten the lives of those who seem to have survived them' Sunday Times 20/7 'No first novel I've read this year stays with me like Blackmoor by Edward Hogan... Hogan knows the terrain and the people, is wise beyond his years... and is a writer of great energy and fearsome powers of observation... Engaged, ambitious and deeply felt -- all the things a first novel should be. He is a writer of huge promise' Hilary Mantel, TLS Dec issue 'For a first novel the style of this book is superlative -- wafting from present to various stages of the past, and providing a jigsaw puzzle of elements provided by the characters, the plots and the setting that add up to something most singular...[it]has so much going for it in evoking people and place that I can only recommend this to all' Bookbag.com 17/2 'Hogan shows intimate acquaintance with the eerie, industrial landscape, "bubbling and steaming like a baking pie", and the narrative is full of fatalistic touches, such as the sound of the colliery band, "now firmly established as the harbinger of misfortune and defeat". The characterisation is deft, particularly that of pale-featured Beth, whose albinism makes her stand out more than is comfortable in a community still capable of crying witch...this is a confident debut' Guardian 18/04

About the Author

Edward Hogan is 26 years old and a graduate of the MA creative writing course at UEA and a recipient of the David Higham Award. BLACKMOOR is his first novel. He is a teacher and lives in London.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Just William on 18 July 2008
Format: Paperback
A novel set in a mining village during the 1980's might lead you to expect something rather predictable; gritty northerners, trouble down't pit and plenty of politics. But with his first novel Hogan has created something far more interesting and unworldly. The cover gives some sense of that; the ethereal glow of the dress and the pale skin beneath it, not to mention that this is a woman at the centre of the story. The strange circumstances of her death are the secret that haunts this story, and the efforts of her son to uncover that past provide the second strand of Hogan's narrative. But the title is important too. The village of Blackmoor is as much a character in this book as any of its inhabitants, and just as John Burnside created such a haunting presence with Innertown in his recent novel Glister, Hogan skillfully creates a myth around another landscape eaten away by industry.

Beth has always been marked out as different. Born 'a long shot' on the 29th February 1956 'the doctor noticed her extreme pallor and that extreme movement of the eyes. The pupils swayed slowly from side to side, or else trembled like a clenched fist'. Her albinism has always made others keep their distance, but George Cartwright becomes fascinated by her at school, almost stalking her, and eventually these two outcasts are married. After the birth of their son, Vincent, Beth suffers from severe post-natal depression and the strains on their marriage are only exacerbated by the events in Blackmoor.

After the collapse of the mining industry Blackmoor is a village in decay. What Hogan avoids is the '...romanticized idea of coalmining towns, informed mainly by the funny parts of the film Kes and repeats of Ridley Scott's Hovis advertisment on The Best One Hundred Adverts of All Time.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By E. T. Mooney on 19 May 2008
Format: Paperback
The language is beautiful and yet it's also page-turning. I read this book in a few sittings, staying up late into the night to finish it. The characters are engagingly complex, their situations intriguing. The setting is as absorbing as the characters. I spent the last week immersed in Hogan's world of disused mines and quarries, teenage-hideouts and barren bedrooms. Remarkable that this is the author's début.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lincs Reader TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 28 Mar 2009
Format: Paperback
An excellent debut novel from this 26 year old author, although when reading it you would never guess this is his first book.

The subject and title of the book - Blackmoor - is a old, decaying pit village on the borders of Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire. Blackmoor pit was closed completely after the miner's strike and the village is slowly subsiding and in danger from gases that are building up in the disused pit. Eventually,British Coal decided to demolish Blackmoor and move the residents to a ready made new village just up the road. Beth, her husband and their small son Vincent will never actually live in the new village - this is the story of the disintegration of their little family. Beth is a little different to the usual mining wives - and suffers with mental health problems. The story of how her husband and son cope is the basis of the book.

This is a beautiful read in places - it is quite stark, the language is spare and to the point, but very poignant in places.

I really enjoyed this and look forward to more from this author
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Lazenby on 6 May 2008
Format: Paperback
Read this in a weekend as it was a cracker! Gets to grips with the conflict that exists within small communities and the attitude that is often prevalent towards "difference" and "outsiders". In spite of the fact that some of the characters are less than pleasant the author manages to inspire a sense of empathy for them. It is not a linear narrative - there are frequent jumps in time, but these in no way detract from the story telling, they enhance the sense of drama and intrigue. Not an easy book to categorise but full of twists and turns!!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By S. Keery on 12 Jun 2009
Format: Paperback
For a first novel this isn't half-bad. Beth's world is one I was immediately interested in and, despite her albinism and nystagmus, a world in which she coped well - for a while. It is her inevitable breakdown that causes her husband, George, to alienate himself from her and their young son, Vincent. Growing up, Vincent tries his best to find out as much as he can about his mother, but his father holds everything close to his chest. To even think of her breaks his heart. However, there is more to this than meets the eye.
Blackmoor is a mining village: a close-knit community at the beck and call of the mine owners. When they are let down by the big bosses they turn to Michael Jenkins, a politician who may have an agenda of his own. The book moves from past to present effortlessly, telling Vincent's story and that of his parents with a simplicity not found in many new books. However, sometimes this simplicity left me yearning for things to get a little more complex. This is a story where the characters are the key, occasionally in need of a little more plot, though. I can't wait to see more from this promising author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By London Bookworm on 15 May 2008
Format: Paperback
What a good read! This book is well written and cleverly written, with the narrator's voice changing throughout the book. The characters are well-drawn and the plot credible. It opens in mystery with a sense of darkness and foreboding, which never entirely leaves the story, and evolves into a boy's journey of self-discovery as he unearths the secrets of his forgotten past. Really enjoyable and highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback