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Black Sheep
 
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Black Sheep

27 Oct 2008 | Format: MP3

10.89 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 13.99 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
5:02
2
4:31
3
5:04
4
7:13
5
4:28
6
6:50
Disc 2
1
3:04
2
6:36
3
8:32
4
4:52
5
11:15

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Oct 2008
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Head Heritage
  • Copyright: 2008 Head Heritage
  • Total Length: 1:07:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IM4YSI
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 157,240 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By IAN FRASER on 25 Sep 2008
Format: Audio CD
The latest in his trademark "mini-double CD offerings, this is Cope's most focussed and melodic efforts for some years. As you would expect, he's heavy on message (the God-bashing is pretty unrelenting)but unlike some of his work of late the music does not become overshadowed by the polemic.

Black Sheep really hits its stride three tracks in with the insanely catchy "These Things I Know" and continues in a rich vein for the rest of CD1 culminating in the quite magnificent "The Shipwreck of St Paul". After CD2's jolly little singalong opener and the rather laboured "Feed My Rock N Roll" the last three tracks are all exquisite reminders of what we know Cope to be capable of but which has often been lacking in his post major label years. There are some particularly welcome echoes of the earlier solo albums in places (that oboe sound especially!).

So a notch or two above last year's "You've Gotta Problem With Me", which was itself a partial return to form after a couple of hit or miss noise-athons. Fans should be pleased with it, the curious may find it well worth checking it out
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Chris Widgery VINE VOICE on 29 Sep 2008
Format: Audio CD
I got into Cope with Peggy Suicide in the early 90s. Then loved Jehovahkill. Less taken with 20 mothers, and then dropped away around Interpreter. Cope went off exploring the outer reaches of planet noise. Loving Iggy and the Stooges and the MC5 and rawwwkk and roll. But along the way forgetting to write more than one or two songs per album (although he did come up with the best song title of the last 20 years with Citizen Cain'd's "I'm living in the room they found Saddam in"). Black Sheep puts a stop to that. He sings again, has written some proper tunes and brought back some of the instruments and the sounds that characterised his earlier work. And a good thing too.

If you're not already a fan you're not even going to be looking at this page, let's be honest. But this is pretty accessible stuff. One star off as his constant anti-religion polemicising is starting to get a bit wearing. We get it, OK? I know it's an essential part of who he is but you can write songs about other stuff too. Like, you know, living in the room they found saddam in...

But a minor quibble for an album that I am sorely tempted to describe as a triumphant return to form.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gunter O'Reilly on 22 Sep 2008
Format: Audio CD
Get this album, the Cope is still one of the most interesting dudes recording today."All the blowing themselves up..." should be played on a loop till it is acknowledged as a modern masterpiece.I'm really impressed with this album, when I put this alongside his Japrocksampler book of last year it makes me think there might be long-term benefits to frying your brains on psychedelics and wearing a turtle shell.
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By Mr. H TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 18 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
How can you possibly go wrong when you're CD comes with a free pair of 3D-spex? Well in some places, with remarkable ease.

Now I'll grant you, I'm not the biggest reggae fan in the world. Not after coming down from an acid trip, while Black Uhuru were playing at Glastonbury in nineteen eighty mumble. However, I am partial to the odd bit of dub, if it's down with style.

So it's when the main players - Gizzy D, Snapper J and Kitty B (who may be using pseudonyms) - get the right supporting cast in place, that things work best. Which means the more conventional tracks like 'Political Patsy' and 'Mediocracy' drift by without making much of an impression. But when they take some chances as on the surprisingly affecting ballad 'Reflections' and the dubby 'Dread Up' that things all click into place.

On this, their third album, Analogue Mindfield demonstrate a sense of adventure and experimentation that lifts them up and above the majority of the moribund and redundant music out there. For sure, it doesn't all work, but at least they're trying to reach for the stars.
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