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Black Like Me Preloaded Digital Audio Player


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Product details

  • Preloaded Digital Audio Player
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605145580
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605145587
  • Product Dimensions: 12.3 x 2.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)

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4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 65 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 4 July 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book carries such a potent message that it should be compulsive reading for all. Last year I studied Race Relations: apartheid in South Africa and segregation in America, as part of my GCSE History syllabus and happened upon this book whilst browsing in the school library during an English lesson. From the moment I read the synopsis, I could not put it down. It's the true story of a white man who disguises himself as a black man and travels to the Deep South in the 1950s in order to discover what kind of life a black really lives in a place where racial hatred runs so deep. The results are incredible, heart-wrenching, and deeply disturbing. It inspires self-questioning. It made me wonder: if one can only learn of oneself by how he reacts to others and others react to him, then surely as other's perceptions of him change in reponse to a superficial outward characteristic such as skin colour, his inward sense or perception of self must also change, thus altering the essence of his soul and the nature of his self knowledge. Griffin found himself referring to blacks as 'we' and 'us', and he experienced a frightening identity crisis; after all, when you look black and others respond to you as black and either alienate or integrate you according to your blackness, the only thing preventing you from being black is your (literal) underlying whiteness! It poses questions about society, social groupings and appearances, and ultimately, how the fragile soul can be damaged or altered as a result of the reactions to the body it occupies. After all, does one's soul have a colour?
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 29 Jan. 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first read this book almost 15 years ago, following studying an extract in an English class school. It was and remains one of the most consciousness raising books I've ever read, and whilst the times which inspired it are gone, it is still relevant today because of the overall message that perception changes everything.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 April 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There are only a few books that have really given me a deeper understanding into the issues of the world around us. This book is one of them.

John Howard Griffin penetrates into a world that seems almost beyond belief and yet is undeniably and startlingly real. Realizations await on every page to show that the generally sheltered cultural perspective of the typical white (like myself) could not conceive the situation which confronted blacks in the south every day just a very few years ago -- as experienced by a white man who changed his skin color and dealt with the consequences.

The book is made even better by a series of stories about his experiences after returning to the world of caucausions and going on the lecture circuit about the plight of blacks in the south. He demonstrates the rationalization and close mindedness that characterizes even those who consider themselves "good people".

This book would probably be too much to accept if not for the authors remarkably unassuming and explanatory style. Rarely has such a sore subject been confronted so directly and yet so plainly.

Highly recommended. I keep having to buy new copies because people will read a few pages and want a copy.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Feb. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Black Like Me" has to be one of the most accomplished books of all time by John Howard Griffin. This nonfictional piece of literature begins with Griffin, a Caucasian, pigmenting his skin to a darker brown, a color resembling that of an African-American, in order to feel what it's like to be an African-American. His destination proceeds throughout the South where he records his real-life experiences and encounters with other African-Americans as well as Caucasians. The transformation of his skin pigment leads him to face the discrimination and prejudice from Caucasians yet allows him to feel a sense of unity among the rest of the African-Americans. The differences of Griffins "two lives" (one being white and the other black) contrasts greatly. As a white, Griffin automatically had the opportunity of entering restaurants, shows, and other places without a problem. He remained healthy, physically, emotionally, and mentally. On the other hand, his life as a black made him lose the opportunities of a white, and therefore, Griffin became emotionally, physically, and mentally unhealthy. What does the large contrast between two lives of the same person with a different shade of skin show about human beings? Even though Griffin's experiences took place forty years ago, this book allows us to question whether society has improved and changed or not. In some ways, I believe it has, but in others, the traditional ways have dominated improvement. Unless you are a victim of prejudice today, one can finally perceive how brutal and painful prejudice and discrimination are through the mind of a white man battling the everlasting war of racism within society. -A.H., 16, IL
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Jun. 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am a 13 years old, and we read this in school. It is usually difficult to find a book I will really be interested in, but I couldn't put this down until I finished the assignment! I had to read, read, read, but then I read all I was allowed to, so I stopped. This book in one word I will describe as EXCELLENT!
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