Black Death 2010

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(165) IMDb 6.4/10
Watch Trailer

Set during the time of the first outbreak of bubonic plague in England, a young monk is tasked with learning the truth about reports of people being brought back to life, a mission that pulls him toward a village ruler who has made a dark pact with evil forces.

Starring:
Sean Bean,Eddie Redmayne
Runtime:
1 hour, 37 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Instant Video.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Horror
Director Christopher Smith
Starring Sean Bean, Eddie Redmayne
Supporting actors Carice Van Houten, Tim Mcinnerny, John Lynch, Johnny Harris, Andy Nyman
Studio Sony Pictures International
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

175 of 184 people found the following review helpful By PJ Rankine TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Aug. 2010
Format: DVD
Of course we have no real way of knowing what the fourteenth century was really like but in this film set in the time of the Black Death director Christopher Smith portrays a grim land stalked by plague and an evangelistic Christianity that is entirely believable. Eddie Redmayne plays Osmund; a novice monk, who has already been tempted by the sins of the flesh and is in love with a local girl called Avril whom he sends away into the forest to escape the plague. His own plague is the doubt that he is a good christian and just as he asks God for a sign so arrives the Bishop's envoy played by Sean Bean. Bean is perfectly cast as the soldier tasked by the bishop to investigate reports of a village in the marshes which has escaped the plague by turning away from God and worshipping a necromancer. Edmund is recruited as a guide and joins Bean's crew of mercenary soldiers on their mission. The English countyside is beautifully portrayed in muted colours throughout and the people are rough, unwashed and authentically portrayed. There is no stylised combat in this film, when violence breaks out it is realistic and brutal and very believable. Eventually the group reach the village which is a picture of order, cleanliness and health but hides a dark secret. Want to know more? Then watch it, this is a good medieval adventure and one of Sean Bean's best roles for a while.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 19 Jun. 2014
Format: Blu-ray
Despite being sold on its blink-and-you’ll-miss-it theatrical release as a fantasy action movie and often being lumped in with Season of the Witch as a poor man’s Medieval horror flick, Black Death is a rather more interesting drama that at once looks at the superstition and paranoia that accompanied the spread of the Bubonic Plague in the Middle Ages through Medieval eyes while also allowing the audience to see beyond mere face value. Eddie Redmayne’s young novice monk, already torn between his vows and the girl he loves, agrees to guide bitter knight Sean Bean and his uncouth band to a village in the marshes untouched by both plague and god, where there are rumors of the dead being raised and unholy rites being practised by a necromancer they are to bring back to stand trial and be executed. As they journey through the plague-riddled land into the heart of darkness, they find instead an idyllic village that seems very much at peace. Appearances, naturally turn out to be deceptive, but is there a supernatural agency at work or is it simply two different systems of belief – Christian and atheist – who believe that the only way to protect themselves from supernatural evil or a vengeful deity is to destroy the other?

The film does a good job of playing with perceptions of various characters as good or bad as they lose or gain some small moral high ground and, despite a distinct sense that something Wickerish this way comes in this bout of general witchfinding, doesn’t quite go as you expect.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
127 of 139 people found the following review helpful By Twiss on 23 Aug. 2010
Format: DVD
This is a low budget movie, yet it offers so much. To be honest I was expecting a poor film, regardless of Sean Bean's involvement. I'm glad I was wrong. What this movie does is show that you don't need to spend billions on effects etc . . . to put together a memorable story. The acting, from many actors I've never even heard of, was of a very high standard, and at times I could feel the tension and fear they experienced. This film wins the viewer over by being creepy and cruel, without shoving it in your face. The script holds its own and manages to convey a very powerfully eerie tome.

Where this movie excels, in my opinion, is in the tone it sets. There is something truly sinister and dark laced throughout the entirety of it all and, unlike many similar films, it actually works. No need for monsters or CGI phantoms. It just manages to draw out your fear through the masterful way it is put together.

My rating is not in comparison to masterpieces such as Lord of the Rings, but is based on what it actually is: a low budget fantasy-horror. A great one. If you like a good medieval-style horror, then I'm sure this is a film you'll enjoy. It doesn't boast loads of huge stars and massive effects, but it holds its own amongst many films I've seen recently that cost ten times the production costs.

Black Death is a film that will surprise and please . . . and chill to the core.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Mar. 2011
Format: DVD
It is 1348 and the Black Death is sweeping the English countryside, killing tens of thousands. A young monk, Osmund, has fallen in love with a young girl who has taken refuge in his monastery. His actions lead him to joining a band of the King's men, led by the knight Ulric, on a mission to find a marshland village reputed to be in the grip of witchcraft. Along the way, he hopes to break off and run away with his love. But in the woodlands he finds himself drawn onto a far darker and crueler path.

Black Death is a relatively low-budget movie financed and made in Germany, although the film is in English and has a mostly British cast. It stars Sean Bean as Ulric and Eddie Redmayne - the main character in the recent adaptation of Pillars of the Earth - as Osmund, with veteran actors David Warner (too many roles to list) and Tim McInnery (Blackadder) in support, along with rising star Carice van Houten (noted for recent roles in Black Book, Valkyrie and Repo Men). A bunch of solid supporting actors such as Emun Elliott (soon to be seen in Game of Thrones, along with Bean) and John Lynch (Merlin's father in the BBC series of the same name) line out the relatively small cast.

Given this is a small-budget movie with Sean Bean wearing armour and swinging a sword, the first impression is of a cheesy action flick. Nothing could be further from the truth. Black Death is a surprisingly bleak and dark movie about faith, power and fundamentalism. Sean Bean's Ulric is a far, far cry from his other heroic roles or his out-and-out villains. Instead he's a God-fearing knight who believes absolutely that the Black Death is God's punishment of humanity for its sins.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again