The Black Country: Scotland Yard Murder Squad Book 2 and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£2.48
  • RRP: £17.79
  • You Save: £15.31 (86%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Black Country (Scotla... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Black Country (Scotland Yard's Murder Squad) Hardcover – 21 May 2013


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£2.48
£2.48 £0.01
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Frequently Bought Together

The Black Country (Scotland Yard's Murder Squad) + The Yard: Scotland Yard Murder Squad Book 1
Price For Both: £15.47

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult (21 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399159339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399159336
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.3 x 23.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 136,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Will keep you riveted from page one (Jeffery Deaver)

CSI: Victorian London (Daily Express)

Throw in deranged prostitutes, poisonings and throat slittings galore, amidst lashings of London fog. Gory, lurid and tons of guilty fun (Guardian) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Alex Grecian has worked for an ad agency on accounts for Harley-Davidson, Cub Foods and The Great American Smokeout, before returning to writing fiction full time and raising his son. Alex is the author of the long-running and critically acclaimed comic-book series Proof, and he lives in Topeka, Kansas, with his wife and son. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 1 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I nearly didn't buy this due to some of the reviews but I recently read The Yard and enjoyed it so I thought I'd risk it. I'm glad I did because I thought it was a good read. It isn't historically accurate but it is a work of fiction so you have to give the author a bit of leeway. I like the characters and the story kept me interested to the final page. Am looking forward to reading the next installment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Steve Benner TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 April 2014
Format: Paperback
My main complaint of Alex Grecian's début novel, "The Yard", was that whilst being reasonably well written, it was poorly researched and consequently unrealistic and anachronistic in its detail. I was hoping that for his follow-on novel, "The Black Country", the author would have learned some lessons and done a bit more preparation by way of background research. Sadly, he has not. In fact, if anything, he has done nothing but the bare minimum of research into the eponymous industrial heart-land of Victorian England for this second volume of his "Murder Squad" series. As far as the book's setting goes, the Black Country of this author's imagination is a very odd place indeed; it appears to be a strange amalgam of locations and centuries, having more in common with Bram Stoker's Transylvania (albeit mercifully free of vampires) than anything remotely English. The idea of English inn-keepers drugging their guests in order to preserve them from encounters with the local bogey-man, Rawhead and Bloody Bones, or even keeping a rifle (sic) behind the bar is odd enough, but the suggestion that Black Country pubs at the start of the twentieth century were surrounded by impenetrable wolf-infested forest, served beer in steins or offered their guests nothing to eat but groaty dick, just shows how ignorant of reality the author is.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In comparison to London, Grecian paints the small mining village as about as superstitious and ‘backward’ as you could imagine. A child and his parents are gone, feared dead yet many of the people in the village, including adults, fear the murders, if there have been any, were carried out by ‘Rawhead’ a fictional monster. It’s such a strange concept but perhaps more believable than I first though, possibly stemming from a human desire to avoid having to live up to the fact that people kill other people, especially children.

In The Yard plenty of people died but in The Black Country there are murders, near murders and accidental deaths all over the place. Once again I found myself being drawn in twenty different directions by many different characters and it’s the pace of the novel that pushes you through the mass of characters, not allowing you to dwell to heavily on any single one. I had issue with so many different intertwined murders and so many different murderers, too much was going on at times to be honest, but I do like the way Grecian writes – perhaps I just wish he kept it a little simpler.

I didn’t work out exactly what had happened in advance but some of it did become clear a little too early for my liking. Even from the first few pages I had a thought that X might have been the killer and it turned out to be true in part but then there were so many different killers it was a little like when will it all end? The grey eyed American and his story seemed like one character too far at times!

I’m being unkind though as I really did enjoy the novel and I’m already anticipating the next in the series. Grecian doesn’t shy away from gore and his creation of the suspicious, uncooperative village community is a such a clever place to put a police investigation. I’m not deterred, I just hope that maybe there’s less going off in different directions next time!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By MH on 12 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Strange story, not terribly well put together. I really liked the first book in the series but this one I'm afraid leaves you out in the cold (no pun intended).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dianne Brown on 24 Dec. 2013
Format: Paperback
Possibly the worst book I have ever read. Don't waste your time reading it. Where to start? The Black Country was not Transylvania and the author has lifted the plot from "The suspicions of Mr Whicher"
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. Shaw on 1 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback
This looked so promising, but turned out to be a big disappointment. Stanwegian has said just about everything that can be said about getting facts right but I just had to mention a couple of things myself which are deeply irritating to the reader.
1) Wolves were hunted to extinction by about the fourteenth century in Britain;
2) The word "okay", whilst existing in the US from the mid nineteenth century, didn't come into popular use in Britain until about a hundred years later. Grecian completely fails to create the formality with which even ordinary people spoke in the 1890s thereby undermining any creation of authenticity in his characters;
3) Women did not introduce themselves by their first names at this time as the school teacher did;
4) English people do not "wash up" anything but dishes, certainly not themselves;
5) Why was nobody in the least bit concerned about the disappearance of Grimes? His murder went completely unremarked.
6) There is very little attempt at distinguishing the characters of the two policemen except that the Sergeant is untidy.

Sorry, that's more than a couple of things! But this is a really annoying book!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback