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Bitter Bitch Paperback – 27 Jan 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Corsair (27 Jan 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849012687
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849012683
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.7 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,078,254 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

This is one of the books that really gets at you. And it is entertaining. (...) It is not just a polemic, not just divisive, not narrow-minded. After Bitterfittan the discussions round the dinner table can do more for equality than all the extremist speeches in the world. (Mattias Bergman Expressen)

Compelling and thought-provoking read (Florence Welch Dazed and Confused)

The book's strength lies in Maria Sveland's honesty and conviction - her anger, sorrow, powerlessness and rebelliousness reach out to us in a way that feels absolutely genuine. (Paulina Helgeson Svenska Dagbladet)

There should be a law demanding that all parents-to-be must read this book. (Moa Eriksson Hallandsposten)

If Maria Sveland's very first book isn't among the paperback bestsellers within six months, then I'll be surprised. Because here there is something sweet and something salty for everyone. (Agneta Rosendal Nerikes Allehanda)

Mention. (Mslexia)

Book Description

The international bestseller that shocked Europe.

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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Victoria on 2 Feb 2011
Format: Paperback
I will always remember reading "The Woman's Room" in my early 20's. I started to read fear of flying a while ago so know the gyst. Fear of Flying is referenced in this new book a lot. In a Northern European way that is refreshing, Sveland shhots from the hip. She says what she thinks and is unapologetic about it. I love that. She is a young mother (30) and is grappling with societal anomolies that are all to easy to become "used to" and ignore. The UK still has the greatest gender pay disparity in the EU (apparently) which begs the question, when did equality drop off the agenda? Gender equality I mean. There are grand strides being made against racism and now ageism (quite rightly), but sexism? Accept or be vocal. Thanks Maria. You opened my eyes again.
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Format: Paperback
Is it allowed to find mothering desperately hard work, although you adore your child? To seethe when you see male colleagues promoted beyond their ability and over your head? Or does that just make you a 'Bitter Bitch'...

This is a witty, truthful novelised look at the inequalities women and Mums still face, not just in the big bad world, but right at home. And, apparently, even in Sweden, supposed haven of equality.

I found myself thinking, YES! every few pages as Sveland's heroine uncovered the everyday unkindnesses, unfairness and lack of understanding most women have faced, but aren't supposed to make a fuss about.

She and her husband, who is a pretty good bloke, find their paths diverging more than they had ever imagined after they have a child. The central question is how can there be such inequality between a man and woman who love each other, and how can they survive it? Big, and taboo, themes tackled from a personal point-of-view: I'm buying copies for a few of my girlfriends, and their chaps!
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By Louise on 15 Dec 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I expected more of this book, perhaps because of all its hype and it's catching title and in contrast to its fine title, I find the book too vague. Overall a good easy read, just don't expect too much in-depth work of art.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The truth seeker on 28 Oct 2011
Format: Paperback
I started reading this book with great enthusiasm, although the title put me off - something is definitely lost in translation there. Soon, however, my enthusiasm turned into frustration as Maria Sveland's ideas never develop into mature arguments, but remain whimsical and under-developed. The book is a catalogue of triggers of frustration for new mothers, all the way from waking up at night to not being able to pursue a career without guilt, going through men's assumption that the woman will always hold the baby. The latter point is probably the most dwelled on in the book and gives it value and some justification to be included in pro women equality books. Maria's style is not literary at all, but merely streams of consciousness, which is another frustration for the reader. The ending takes Maria right back to where she started without having changed or achieved anything at all, and yet she is happy and content giving the impression that there are no more battles for women to fight - only trips to be taken on their own away from their young families. This I think is the book's greatest failing, and it almost de-qualifies it from being included in pro women equality books!
If you prepare yourself to be underwhelmed, the book is probably still worth a read as it does genuinely air, no matter how weakly, many of women's frustrations with how backwards modern western societies still are when it comes to issues of equality.
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By Monika Torchalska on 4 Oct 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
funny!
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