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Birds: Through Irish Eyes Hardcover – 17 Sep 2012

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 332 pages
  • Publisher: The Collins Press (17 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1848891628
  • ISBN-13: 978-1848891623
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 25.4 x 29.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 523,601 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Fascinating and enthralling. --Irish News

Special mention needs to be made of an author who can use the word 'eisteddfod' while remaining eminently readable and quotable at length. --Steve Rutt, BirdGuides.com

A book about a new way of seeing, regarding, understanding and enjoying birds ... top blokes, top birds, top book! --Chris Packham

About the Author

Anthony McGeehan, from Belfast, has been watching and photographing birds since childhood. Today, he works with BirdWatch Ireland on bird surveys and monitoring schemes, and leads bird tours. His first published articles date from 1980 and he has since written widely for magazines and journals, including some in Europe and North America, as well as regular newspaper contributions. His book, Birding From The Hip, attracted much favourable comment. www.anthonymcgeehan.com Julian Wyllie is perhaps amongst the last of a generation of birders who taught themselves to read with The Observer s Book of Birds. Sharing his lifelong love for the natural world with a fascination for post-1965 underground music, he worked as a second-hand record dealer and has had a multitude of contracts with conservation bodies. Since 2004 he has lived on Sherkin Island in west Cork, where he spends his time birding or listening to The Fall.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Keith Betton on 9 Nov. 2012
Format: Hardcover
Birds Through Irish Eyes
Anthony McGeehan & Julian Wylie
The Collins Press. 2012.
Colour illustrations. 336 pages.
£35.00
ISBN 9781848891623

Anthony McGeehan's reputation for expressive and entertaining writing is legendary. His articles in columns in magazines nearly always hit the spot, while his book Birding From The Hip attracted much favourable comment - although if you were not on his wavelength it possibly went over your head! Here, he joins with fellow Cork birder Julian Wyllie to tell the stories that explain what most people want to know about Ireland's birds. About 200 species are featured, with a articles of 500-1000 words on each. There are a couple of surprises - as included within these are Great Auk (lost to the world in 1844) together with Capercaillie (which became extinct in Ireland in the 18th Century). White-tailed Eagle and Crane are also included - and with luck reintroduction plans for both may see them return to Ireland in the way that Red Kites are starting to thrive. Amazingly Great Spotted Woodpeckers have made the return on their own.

Much of the text refers back to days when Ireland's wildlife habitats were in better shape than today, and there are frequent references to William Thompson's 4-volume milestone The Natural History of Ireland, and the works of other Irish authors. At the beginning and the end of the book are short chapters covering issues such as the loss of woodlands and the advance of farming, plus ways to look for birds and the equipment to use. In addition, scattered amongst the species texts are short essays on subjects such as moult, uncommon gulls, Chiffchaff and Willow Warbler identification and bird migration.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By nigel woolliscroft on 2 Feb. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
You need to have this the best book on birds in ireland to date, not just a top class reference work also a good read. Incredibly well researched.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anon on 10 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
well written and has wonderful pictures Full of relevant information for beginners
gave this as a present -recipient was delighted
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By GWW_02 on 27 Jan. 2013
Format: Hardcover
This is a book not just for the Irish birder but any one interested in birds in general. Yes there is a lot about Irish birds but the text also includes a lot about the 200 species of birds in general. Take the Mediterranean Gull nearly thought to be on the way out to extinction but suddenly explodes into life and rises from 30,000 pairs to 300,000. Nothing to do with the 2 pairs possible nesting in Ireland. There are facts about Jersey Reed Warblers and the new tracking of raptors and waders around the world. Again not always about the Irish bird movements. The history of the birds is predominantly from Ireland by a certain William Thompson in 4 volumes from 1849 - 1852 but the new history is certainly in Anthony's own version.

Anthony, himself, has served his apprenticeship with the RSPB over in Ireland but then branched out into birds themselves. There are several quotes of their present work such as `PR Zealots who fill the ears of gullible public with warm pink fluff'. But the amazing thoughts come out blaming crows and Magpies for the mismanagement of hedgerows and landscape when it is man himself to blame.

I did read this book from cover to cover [not like some reviews] and found some great facts in it for many species. I loved the fact that Anthony was blaming the chemical Ivermectin for destroying food for so many of the birds feeding on pastures. [something I have suspected for a while] and the descriptions of many of the birds were an eye opener. Who would have thought little Jenny Wren had legs like Kangaroos or 35 jays could bury 200,000 acorns and find every one again leaving no Oaks to grow up! Waxwings ate 25 million berries in 10 days but who counted them or Starlings are equivalent to army ants.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
Irish birds 17 Jun. 2013
By Keith Betton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Anthony McGeehan's reputation for expressive and entertaining writing is legendary. His articles in columns in magazines nearly always hit the spot, while his book Birding From The Hip attracted much favourable comment - although if you were not on his wavelength it possibly went over your head! Here, he joins with fellow Cork birder Julian Wyllie to tell the stories that explain what most people want to know about Ireland's birds. About 200 species are featured, with a articles of 500-1000 words on each. There are a couple of surprises - as included within these are Great Auk (lost to the world in 1844) together with Capercaillie (which became extinct in Ireland in the 18th Century). White-tailed Eagle and Crane are also included - and with luck reintroduction plans for both may see them return to Ireland in the way that Red Kites are starting to thrive. Amazingly Great Spotted Woodpeckers have made the return on their own.

Much of the text refers back to days when Ireland's wildlife habitats were in better shape than today, and there are frequent references to William Thompson's 4-volume milestone The Natural History of Ireland, and the works of other Irish authors. At the beginning and the end of the book are short chapters covering issues such as the loss of woodlands and the advance of farming, plus ways to look for birds and the equipment to use. In addition, scattered amongst the species texts are short essays on subjects such as moult, uncommon gulls, Chiffchaff and Willow Warbler identification and bird migration.

The photographs have been compiled by the authors and a further 27 photographers and all are stunning - often filling the page. I only noticed one error - a juvenile Red Kite labelled as an adult (p 102).

This is an excellent book. It is beautifully illustrated - and in every species account I felt I learned something about the bird that might be useful in my own local patch which is a long way from Ireland!
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