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35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
TOP 50 REVIEWERon 3 February 2009
Campbell's Big TOE refers to nothing less than a Theory of Everything. In a bigger picture of our existence than is usually presented, My Big TOE weaves many theories together to create a model of reality through which you can begin your journey towards a higher quality of consciousness.

Campbell's books are derived from his own experiences with altered states of consciousness, his work and experiments with respected people in various fields, and the objective verification of the results. The author shows how previously, Philosophy, Physics, and Metaphysics clashed in their isolated quests for answers to the nature of reality, and that, by setting the camera of our conscious mind to a wide-angle lens, we can better understand reality in the larger sense.

Overall, the book is a good, mind expanding read, but the author's casual style and bad jokes are annoying, as is his repetition, lack of focus, and confusion over the interests of the audience. These all contribute to the immense size of this trilogy. The author includes meandering "asides" and sometimes there is an aside to the aside of an aside - contributing to an amateurish and self-indulgent feel whereas a good editor could have slashed the trilogy down to half its size, while still being complete and succinct.

Instead, a DVD of a talk given by the author at the LSE in 2008, essentially summarising (in a simplified and easier to understand way) his main points is available via the author's website in the US and (for £10 incl P&P) via the London College of Spirituality in the UK! The author is a much better speaker than writer.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 13 January 2010
There have probably been many books claiming to be promulgate a 'Theory Of Everything'. which is a subject that holds fascination for scientists, philosophers and sophists alike.

This one submits a model of reality that is expressed in a language of western rationality in general, and computer science/ digital physics in particular.

Being someone of that ilk/ pre-disposition, I would rate this as one of the most important books I have read, to date.

Among many other things, the book has helped me define the core 'Objective function' for myself - the continuous improvement of the quality of consciousness. The simplicity and clarity of that objective function is highly liberating, and almost heralds the beginning of a new chapter.

The ToE is constructed through a few meta-themes, which are not uncommon in their own right, but uniquely rendered through a new lens:

1) Beliefs and self-imposed limitations
2) Ideas from the edge
3) Education , learning and personal growth
4) Wisdom (distinguished from knowledge)
5) Fear, ego and delusion
6) Truth, science and logic

Most fundamentally, the author contends that the path has to be walked, not just read of intellectualized on.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 13 February 2013
This book is absolutely fantastic for many reasons. It delivers a framework for the comprehension of the larger consciousness system as well as fleshing out why we are here and the context of our existence as seen from a much larger perspective. The book is tedious at times and can be very repetitive indeed but we must understand that it is written for the mass audience, both right minded and left minded people, people with a deep understanding of quantum physics and people without. People often question Campbell for not including specific details about NPMR, such as entities encountered etc. The reason being that Campbell does not want to pollute and prejudice the experience for people that learn to access NPMR. If you want to read descriptions that are entertaining and of mild importance to you and your quality of consciousness etc then read the likes of Monroe, Buhlman's and many more authors fabulous books, they'll describe the astral in great detail and help you get there for sure but the astral is but the astral, and as vast as that is it's a sub-set of the LCS. This book however really gives one a sense of why we are here, how our reality is seen from the larger perspective, how we can lower our entropy ( raise our spirituality) and the notable effects this has here and now in the physical reality, how meditation is a tool to access NPMR and indeed improve your quality of awareness in general, how ego and fear are the cause of most of our suffering and how to deal with those, and much much more.
To conclude this rather lengthy post I must say this much, the book needs to be read fully and perhaps twice or three times to really get fantastic value out of it. Campbell advocates twice daily meditation of 20 minutes at least and this is extremely beneficial. Readers need to be patient, the book is written for a mass audience of varying backgrounds and as such it must be palatable for a seriously wide variety of minds. The book needs to be read at a pace that's comfortable, you must not rush it. This book has been assaulted by some of the finest minds in the world for the past 10 years now and so far its holding watertight. The theory is based on only two assumptions; 1, consciousness is fundamental to reality and 2, evolution is a fact.
This book is far ahead of it's time and anybody that reads it, gets it and becomes a part of its application will benefit beyond their wildest dreams. It's benefit for us here and now, in this reality ( totally aside from adventures into the non-physical) is immensely important.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 1 September 2010
Thomas Campbell manages to the create a logical Big TOE (Theory of Everything) from just 2 assumptions. One assumption is perfectly acceptable by a large majority of the human race, the other, seemingly mystical (although, as explained in the book, this is a logical requirement). Tom uses good, clear science to create this model of reality that will leave you mind stretched, humbled, and in awe.

The great thing about this trilogy is that it requires NO belief, in fact the author is strictly clear that if you were to BELIEVE this book, he would have failed. It requires only 'open-mined scepticism' and the occasional 'tasting of the pudding'.

The trilogy is aimed at the average western minded 'Joe'. No eastern philosophy is needed, nor a physics degree, to fully understand the concepts put forward by the author. All is explained very well, with western metaphors and analogies, and in simple enough terms to understand easily.

The books unify physics and philosophy, creating sound scientific understanding reality, but also an understanding of how you fit in, your purpose and what you must do to grow.

Although the books may seem to repeat and recap quite a lot, I found this very helpful. Some of the concepts need to be repeated, put into multiple cases, for you to gain a full understanding. Also, the 'bad jokes' are not that bad, in fact I found myself laughing out loud on a few occasions. The authors light heartiness and humour actually make the book a much more interesting read, and even help you understand certain things.

Overall, I loved this book. It left me with a great realisation that things are not as a they seem. It showed me great loop holes and errors in the belief based modern science followed by the sheep in the middle. It gave me great understanding about my ego and fears, and left me truly humbled. Thomas Campbell is the next Albert Einstein, exploring the fringe, propelling physics and philosophy past its self limitations.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 26 January 2011
My Big Toe: A Trilogy Unifying Philosophy, Physics, and Metaphysics: Awakening, Discovery, Inner WorkingsAdvice: Try and watch some You Tube videos of Thomas Campbell first to get a handle on the concepts. My Big Toe = the big T -heory O-f E-verything - is exactly what it says on the tin. Be prepared to leave your ideas and beliefs suspended while reading this. Tom Campbell is a physicist and this is the approach he takes, although he has made it as user-friendly as possible for a lay reader. But, once you get through the first book, your well on the way to changing your whole Life of the Universe and much much more.

His style is humorous and he will drag you kicking and screaming out of your wee small box even if you think yours is a relatively BIG BOX, Seriously - if you really are looking for the answer to EVERYTHING and are prepared to do what ever it takes to come as near to a/the truth as much is currently available - this is the one to read. I would particularly recommend this trilogy to any young, up-and-coming physicist/computer scientists (Techies) etc, as I believe that this is the BIG THEORY OF EVERYTHING that the scientific community needs NOW. The Big T.O.E. even explains the 'measurement problem'! And for those who are more metaphysically/mystically orientated - yes it answers all those questions too!
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on 19 July 2015
Of all the books I have read on consciousness after death, metaphysics, afterlife etc this is probably the toughest one that I have EVER read on the subject. It would be a great benefit to have some experience in physics to grasp this but if not you just are going to have to take it line by line and work at it. 800 plus pages is going to be tough at the best of times mind!
This is the total opposite of anything that you would read from say a John Edwards or a James Van Praagh book! There is a lot of terminology used here to describe notions like God and The Afterlife realm. For example where another book might describe the non physical part of us as a soul or spirit, Tom Campbell has coined the phrase Individual Units Of Consciousness so you will see the acronym IUOC repeated many, many times through the book. I think God is refereed to as AUM if I remember and there is a lot of this throughout the book. You do get used to it though, it just needs patience.

Another interesting aspect is that Tom Campbell is a big practitioner of Out Of The Body Experiences so in a way, he does feel he has first hand experience of otherworldly realms & realities. I particularly enjoyed his descriptions of The Big Cheese, apparently this is an entity on the other side who keeps all of the IUOC's inline (pay attention ;-))

I would recommend it AFTER reading some of the other books I have reviewed on the subject of life after death, its not a book ideally if you have just been bereaved perhaps. If so start with Julia Assante, David Fontana, Michael Newton, Bob Olsen, Stafford Betty, Michael Tymn or maybe even Anthony Peake (although his ideas are not a traditional afterlife).

Just keep exploring with an open mind...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
After seeing the author at one of his seminars, this book is one that I can't put down as I know that what I am reading was written with passion and from the heart. A little bit difficult at first but a great read.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on 22 June 2012
I must make it clear that I'm talking about the book, here, not Tom Campbell's ideas. My own copy of the book is littered with notes containing such words as "self-contradictory", "unscientific", "illogical", "repetitive", "irrelevant", "rubbish" and so on. It is sad that TC does himself and his ideas such a lot of damage, but a salutary reminder to those who would rush into print at the first opportunity without the help of an editor with a plentiful supply of blue pencils. If all the repetition and rambling home-spun wisdom were omitted, the book would be reduced by at least half its length, with great benefit. I can understand that TC felt he had to write for a certain audience, but the problem is that by doing so he alienates many of those who would otherwise give his ideas deep consideration - and wonderful ideas many of them are. He has set himself an almost impossible task (like Descartes) of starting from as simple and unarguable a truth as he can find, and deserves the utmost respect for trying. However, it is all too easy to pick out logical flaws, and to disagree with his fundamental definitions (on which a lot rests). He can also justifiably be accused of trying to construct a deity in his own image - a charge, to be fair, that he himself vigorously denies. He also fails - in the book - to deal with genuine scientific problems such as computability, randomness, freedom and free will (he simply defines these problems not to exist), and quantum indeterminacy, specifically with respect to the measurement problem where he seems to take different (and incompatible) views as it suits him. One of the biggest failings, in my view, is that he relies far too heavily on an extrapolated Darwinism, which is surely exactly the sort of belief trap he himself decries at such length, and which leads to circular arguments and unjustified propositions. This is particularly sad since there are alternative hypotheses which could have been used (q.v. Stephen Wolfram's work on cellular automata) which would arguably have been a lot more scientific.

However, I know from meeting him at a weekend conference, and email exchanges, that he is a deeply thoughtful person (as well as a very charming and delightful one) and that his writing is a poor introduction to his Big TOE. I can't in all honesty recommend the book to anyone, but if you can plough through it, think about it, above all talk about with others who are also not blinkered disciples, you will gain some fascinating and wonderful insights into reality and consciousness.
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on 29 September 2013
An excellent read. Intelligent, humorous and the expansion to the world view it proposes is fascinating. Its made me look much more closely at the experimental results that demonstrate this model of physics. Especially the "Delayed choice quantum eraser" performed by Yoon-Ho Kim, R. Yu, S.P. Kulik, Y.H. Shih and Marlan O. Scully. This could well be the next great scientific paradigm.
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on 18 September 2013
I found the first 100 pages or so fascinating and I couldn't put it down. However, the next 70 pages have been really hard going- this may be me. I am still persevering.
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