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Big Data Glossary Paperback – 25 Sep 2011


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Product details

  • Paperback: 62 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (25 Sept. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449314597
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449314590
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 0.3 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,197,254 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

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Product Description

Book Description

A Guide to the New Generation of Data Tools

About the Author

A former Apple engineer, Pete Warden is the founder of OpenHeatMap, and writes on large-scale data processing and visualization.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michele Milesi on 23 Oct. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is good starting point to who have to deal with big data, with more than sixty tools described in less than fifty pages.
As a glossary is supposed to be, each term is not described in deep, but the book reports some hints about similar tools and suggests when you may found useful explore that tool.

Experienced people may found the description of a well know term too brief, but the glossary is so huge that they can found new tools to investigate.

In my opinion the book lacks of a complete references list, but a short internet search may set aside that defect.
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Format: Paperback
I was kinda skeptical when I first had my hands on these 60 pages and, after getting through them (that did not take so much), I’m still kinda puzzled. I did not get confused by the content, no. I guess if you decide to read this book, you must know what to expect from it, else you will end up pretty much disgusted with both the money and time wasted.

Let’s make it clear: this book doesn’t teach you anything. After thirty minutes or so, when you reach the back cover, you will not have learned anything. But chances are you will open Iceweasel, or whatever your favorite browser is, and go search more information about some of the tools the author described.

And that’s the one and only aim of the author: to make you wanna know more about some specific application that you were not aware of. I did search something indeed, so that, in that sense, mission accomplished.

Now, would I suggest reading the book? Yea, why not. You can always find out someone is developing something that could be useful to you.

Would I suggest buying the book. No. For a couple of reasons:
1. It’s not worth the money. This book should not be a book, but rather some kind of weekly newsletter or better, O’Really should make sure that Amazon and any other book store, gives yo ua ocpy of this title whenever you purchase an IT book, to show you the latest technologies and tell you hey, we’ve got a book covering that subject!
2. The book is outdated already. It’s from 2011. Technology advances so fast that what was hot and cool four years ago now has probably been replaced by something else.

As usual, you can find more reviews on my personal blog: http://books.lostinmalloc.com. Feel free to pass by and share your thoughts!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
What a waste! 3 Dec. 2011
By Thomas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am not sure what it took for a respectful brand like O'Reilly's to waste its reputation on a series of books that would frankly make Gutenberg roll over in his grave. This is yet another one of those "Let's get it out to market quickly so we don't waste the latest buzzword wave" books. Tim, please stop this! Blogs, Twitter, and Facebook are the medium for short attention span literature. The printed word is not!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
I won't recommend this 24 April 2012
By Jayakumar Gopalan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
First of all, the content of this book is a good candidate for an article / blog * definitely NOT for a book that too when you expect to pay $20 * Most of us won't expect this kind of book where you can get better information from wikipedia about these buzz words just following links from big data [...]

However, they didn't cheat me and they mentioned the title as Big Data Glossary and amazon mentioned the number of pages as 62, so I shouldn't have expect more content in it. I have to write-off this ~ $20.

I didn't mean to promote this book, but if you are interested in Big Data look out for Manning's Big Data by Nathan Marz @nathanmarz (it is in MEAP / early access / rough cuts stage and I paid the MEAP and as of this writing Nathan set out three chapters) and it clearly explains the why, when, what, how of Big Data (so far in the three chapters why and when was laid out very clearly waiting for other chapters for what and how). Sorry if I talked too much about Nathan's book but I couldn't stop typing about it.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Be Careful! 24 Feb. 2012
By Paco - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The title of the book is "Big Data Glossary" and the listing here on Amazon clearly indicates it's only 60 pages. If you're ordering this book to learn all about the avalanche of big data technologies.... you will not be happy. (It only takes an hour to read.)

If, on the other hand, you want a quick read to understand the basic concepts behind many of the hot big-data technologies, this would probably be a good read... but remember that it's only a glossary. Is it worth $20? Not my $20.... I read it on Safari.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Delivers what it claims for 6 Mar. 2012
By Dan InGold - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you are new to the field and want to have a general overview of Big data tools within 2 hours, this is a great book for you. From here, you will stay in touch with the most recent technologies. This book will point you to many resources. If you are already in the field, this is not a book for you and there is no reason that this book will catch your eye in the first place.
A quick overview of the latest big data technologies. 10 Jan. 2015
By Jascha Casadio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was kinda skeptical when I first had my hands on these 60 pages and, after getting through them (that did not take so much), I’m still kinda puzzled. I did not get confused by the content, no. I guess if you decide to read this book, you must know what to expect from it, else you will end up pretty much disgusted with both the money and time wasted.

Let’s make it clear: this book doesn’t teach you anything. After thirty minutes or so, when you reach the back cover, you will not have learned anything. But chances are you will open Iceweasel, or whatever your favorite browser is, and go search more information about some of the tools the author described.

And that’s the one and only aim of the author: to make you wanna know more about some specific application that you were not aware of. I did search something indeed, so that, in that sense, mission accomplished.

Now, would I suggest reading the book? Yea, why not. You can always find out someone is developing something that could be useful to you.

Would I suggest buying the book. No. For a couple of reasons:
1. It’s not worth the money. This book should not be a book, but rather some kind of weekly newsletter or better, O’Really should make sure that Amazon and any other book store, gives yo ua ocpy of this title whenever you purchase an IT book, to show you the latest technologies and tell you hey, we’ve got a book covering that subject!
2. The book is outdated already. It’s from 2011. Technology advances so fast that what was hot and cool four years ago now has probably been replaced by something else.

As usual, you can find more reviews on my personal blog: http://books.lostinmalloc.com. Feel free to pass by and share your thoughts!
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