Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Beyond the Shattered Image: Insights into an Orthodox Christian Ecological Worldview [Mass Market Paperback]

John Chryssavgis
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Available from these sellers.



Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Light & Life Publishing Company (1 Feb 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1880971429
  • ISBN-13: 978-1880971420
  • Product Dimensions: 20.6 x 13.2 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,804,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Green Theology 6 Jan 2011
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is a well-argued and profound analysis of Orthodox theology relating to the environment and humanity's duty of care towards it. It relates the ancient wisdom of the Church, especially the desert fathers, to the modern ecological disaster. This is clearly a book that needed to be written. The theology is complex and closely argued and, although I am an educated layman, I found it fairly heavy going in parts. For that reason I could only give the book 4 stars. However, if you're willing to persevere through the tough bits, you'll find plenty to make you think.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seeing creation with new eyes 15 Aug 2000
By Vincent Rossi - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Beyond the Shattered Image, authored by Orthodox theologian, John Chryssavgis, aims to present the full ecological significance of the Orthodox Christian worldview in its deepest, widest and highest sense. It is a tribute to the maturity and clarity of the author’s thought that he is able to accomplish this task in a slim volume of less than two hundred pages, and to present an essentially Eastern Orthodox perspective in such an attractive, irenic and winsome way that it should appeal across the denominational board.
The heart of an Orthodox ecological worldview, according to Chryssavgis, consists of the vision, the conception and, above all, the experience of the world as sacrament. To know and accept the sacramentality of the world in a truly effective way-â€"hat is, in a way that transforms the way we think, feel and act toward the creationâ€"requires, to begin with, a conceptual awareness of the Divine Presence in the world as reciprocal transcendence and immanence, and, developing upon that conception, an experiential realization of that Presence in all created things. Now as God alone is sacred and the source of the sacred, a sense of God’s presence in and involvement with the created order is experienced by the believer as a sense of the sacred in creation. The creation as such is not considered sacred in the Orthodox tradition, but the creation as a sure sign of God’s will, providence and purpose is a revelation of the sacred in and through the world. Furthermore, if every life-form, indeed, every created object reveals in its own way the presence and purpose of God, then every created thing is also a symbolâ€"that is, a visible and material form that not only represents but literally re-presents the invisible and beyond-the-physical dimensions of reality. “All creation,” says Chryssavgis, “is a palpable mystery, an immense incarnation of cosmic proportions.” The sacramental principle is the means by which “we understand the world around us as being sacred.” The world around usâ€"which is, not coincidentally, the basic definition of environmentâ€"is not conceived in the Orthodox tradition as a conglomeration of objects, life-forms and processes without intrinsic meaning, but a vast revelation of God, called by the Fathers of the Church, the “Book of Nature” composed of numberless “words of God,” the created beings which are living symbols that reveal as well as conceal the presence and purpose of God in creation. The sacred, the sacrament, and the symbol: for Chryssavgis, these three elements form the basis of the sacramental ecology of the Orthodox Tradition.
The sacred, sacramental and symbolic dimensions of creation in the Orthodox worldview may be summed up in the saying of St. John of Damaskos that “the whole world is a single icon of God.” Dr. Chryssavgis’ book elaborates on this insight of the Damascene in a thoroughly satisfying way. He does not neglect to point out, in harmony with all the patristic writers, that only through prayer and ascesis is it possible to heal the current environmental degradation of God’s creation, the root cause of which is sin. This is an extremely well-written book that gets to the heart of the issue, and shows how much the traditional cosmology of the Orthodox Church can contribute to its solution.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Green Theology 8 Jan 2011
By C. Moorey - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This is a well-argued and profound analysis of Orthodox theology relating to the environment and humanity's duty of care towards it. It relates the ancient wisdom of the Church, especially the desert fathers, to the modern ecological disaster. This is clearly a book that needed to be written. The theology is complex and closely argued and, although I am an educated layman, I found it fairly heavy going in parts. For that reason I could only give the book 4 stars. However, if you're willing to persevere through the tough bits, you'll find plenty to make you think.
2.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly answering the WRONG question 7 April 2014
By CJS Hayward - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback
The text is brilliant, and at times inspiring. It is also answering the wrong question.

St. Irenaeus, in Against Heresies, talked about how the heretics started with what I would term a wrong "skeleton" (hypothesis), then moulded "clay-like flesh" (plasma) around the skeleton to create the wrong thing. St. Irenaeos states, "Their manner of acting is just as if one, when a beautiful image of a king has been constructed by some skilful artist out of precious jewels, should then take this likeness of the man all to pieces, should rearrange the gems, and so fit them together as to make them into the form of a dog or of a fox, and even that but poorly executed; and should then maintain and declare that this was the beautiful image of the king which the skilful artist constructed, pointing to the jewels which had been admirably fitted together by the first artist to form the image of the king, but have been with bad effect transferred by the latter one to the shape of a dog, and by thus exhibiting the jewels, should deceive the ignorant who had no conception what a king's form was like, and persuade them that that miserable likeness of the fox was, in fact, the beautiful image of the king."

Chryssavgis's text quotes for the most part unimpeachable Orthodox sources. And individual details are in some continuity with Orthodox Tradition. But the overriding purpose to which all these quotations are conscripted is an overall shape which would have been impossible before environmentalism as we know it, there is no justification given to the archetypally strong language of rape in talking about any misuse of the earth, and he speaks about becoming "disciples of the earth" without talking about being "disciples of Christ". In the end it seems, tacitly for the attention he gives, that the Creation is the center of gravity around which the Church and Christ revolve, rather than Christ being the center around whom the Church and Creation revolve, and the Church revolving around Christ more than around Creation. Now of course individual passages may clarify "Christ is the head," but the overall (deliberate) impression formed by what he says and how much he says it places Creation, not Christ, as the Center.

Now the Orthodox Church does respect Creation and has NEVER drawn too sharp a line between Christ the Savior of the Church and Christ the Savior of Creation. But it talks much more explicitly and focally about Christ the Savior of the Church, and the threads that are presented as if they were the bread and butter of Orthodox Christianity talking about Creation when they are in fact a descant and nine out of ten sentences in any classic Orthodox sources I have read, including EVERY classic I have read and recognized among this book's sources, and there is a good chunk of Orthodox dough that is left outside of Chryssavgis's cookie cutter. To quote just a few words from the end of Chapter 15 of The Ladder of Divine Ascent, arguably the greatest Orthodox classic since the Bible, which Chryssavgis mentions briefly (and it would be extremely insulting to doubt that Chryssavgis knew even if he didn't mention it): "By what rule or manner can I bind this body of mine? By what precedent can I judge him? Before I can bind him he is set loose, before I can condemn him I am reconciled to him, before I can punish him I bow down to him and feel sorry for him... He is my helper and my enemy, my assistant and my opponent, a protector and a traitor. I am kind to him and he assaults me... If he has a rest he becomes unruly. If I upset him he cannot stand it." This is a major thread in Orthodox literature, more major in for instance the repeatedly cited Maximus Confessor in Chryssavgis, and it is simply left out of the cookie cutter stamp of marshaling Orthodox theology to the service of environmentalism. It is part of the flesh of Orthodoxy that is not attached to the new environmental skeleton in this book.

Some passages in the book are beautiful. Some could be used to make a better book. But the title, like most other books with a title beginning with "Beyond...", is a warning label that what's going on is marshaling Orthodoxy in the service of something else, or taking clay-like flesh to fill out contours on an unrelated skeleton.

I am eminently concerned with many of the questions the book addresses; I write about some of them myself, but my concern is in the service of Orthodoxy, not about Orthodoxy in the support of environmentalism.

CJS Hayward, author, The Luddite's Guide to Technology, which intended to an Orthodox ascetical look and is eminently concerned with Creation, but is intended to look at things in light of Orthodoxy instead of marhalling Orthodoxy to serve environmentalism.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback