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Beyond Here Lies Nothing (The Concrete Grove Trilogy) Paperback – 13 Sep 2012

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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Solaris (13 Sept. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1781080208
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781080207
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 2 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 180,667 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Gary McMahon's fiction has appeared in magazines and anthologies in the U.K. and U.S and has been reprinted in both The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror and The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. He is the British-Fantasy-Award-nominated author of Rough Cut, All Your Gods Are Dead, Dirty Prayers, How to Make Monsters, Rain Dogs, Different Skins, Pieces of Midnight and To Usher, The Dead, and has edited an anthology of original novelettes titled We Fade to Grey. For Abaddon Books and Solaris he has written Hungry Hearts and the Concrete Grove trilogy, and for Angry Robot he has written the Thomas Usher books.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Greg James on 26 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Beyond Here Lies Nothing is the end of the Concrete Grove trilogy and it could not have had a better ending. I loved the previous two books but this one is, hands down, my favourite. The cover art is the best of the series and from the cover onwards, it only gets better and the threads spun throughout the previous books are brought together and woven into a dark, ensnaring web. It is in Beyond Here Lies Nothing that I would say a true sense of numinous awe comes through as the truth behind The Concrete Grove and its denizens, natural and otherwise, is finally explained. There were certain sections that reminded me of Ramsey Campbell's The Darkest Part of the Woods as the story reaches for the cosmic and the weird as much as the grotesque. Make no mistake, Gary McMahon does not pull his punches when it comes to the more visceral scenes here but these underscore the more disturbing aspects of the story rather than becoming excessive or exploitative. The warped state of one returning character has to be seen, or rather read, to be believed. Also, as ever, the author is not satisfied with neat and tidy endings. Here there is still ambiguity and mystery. Questions lead to more questions rather than answers. Much like in life. Dread piles upon dread, leaving you waiting for the next book in the series - then you realise that this is it, that beyond here lies nothing - and that's the way it should be. The Concrete Grove is a trilogy that leaves you reflecting, feeling and thinking in a way that only the best literature can do. I don't just recommend this book. I recommend all three. Go on, treat yourself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ginger Nuts of Horror TOP 500 REVIEWER on 21 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
One of the worst things about running a horror website, is the fact that you tend to get caught up in it far too much. To the point where you forget to write reviews for books that haven't been sent in for review. So when I realised that I hadn't posted a review for Gary McMahon's Beyond Here Lies Nothing I was both shocked and a little bit embarrassed. The two previous instalments of this loose linked trilogy were some the best horror novels I had read in a long time, dark, gritty tales of pure urban terror. The Concrete Grove trilogy was shaping up to be one of horror's must read trilogies.

Why anyone would be interested in going to The Concrete Grove, is beyond me. This housing estate with the tower block The Needle at its centre is an estate that is beyond repair. It's a run down, shabby, and dirty place whose residents are just as broken as the estate itself. But Marc Price wants to go there, he is interested in the the Northumberland Poltergeist, an infamous case from the 1970's were a pair of twins were haunted by a malevolent spirit named Captain Clickety.

As he investigates he s slowly drawn to the broken mother whose daughter went missing during the spate of child abductions that the media dubbed "The Gone away Girls". However this brings him to the attention of the missing girls father, who pays Marc a visit one night, and makes it more than clear what will happen is he stays. He is also the sights of DS Royle, a policeman who has never truly closed the book on the missing girls, a man haunted by his past.

But when the Scarecrows start appearing with photographs of the missing girls, and the humming birds return to the grove, we know this is beginning of the end. Something is coming to The Grove.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ever since I started getting back into reading horror in a big way (round about 2010 or so - aside from Stephen King, I hadn't read any new horror for a number of years prior to this), there have been a good number of 'new' authors I've discovered who have impressed me mightily. Chief among these, has been Gary McMahon, whose work I believe I first came across in Spectral Press' début chapbook, What They Hear In The Dark, an impressive slice of suburban dread, oppression and fear with an emotional kick at its core.

Since then, I've tried to get my hands on everything Gary has released (book-wise, that is). I bought both Thomas Usher novels from Angry Robot publishing (and read them and loved them), got various collections of stories and novellas he was releasing (especially if they were limited, signed editions), and finally came across The Concrete Grove trilogy, which I think had just had the third instalment published. My reading habits not being even close to as prolific as they were when I was younger, it took me a long time to get around to finishing the trilogy. But finish it I now have. And what an accomplishment it is...

If you haven't read the first two books, I urge you to do so because I cannot stress how good they are. Unfortunately, I cannot avoid revealing details of the preceding novels, but I will endeavour, like all my reviews, to give as little away about the actual plot of the story as I possibly can.

So...as has been the case with the other novels, the third book of The Concrete Grove trilogy focusses on its own self-contained story, although it is inexorably intertwined with the preceding two and by necessity, it has recurring characters, revisited settings and an overall, arcing and original mythology.
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