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Verdi: I Masnadieri
 
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Verdi: I Masnadieri

9 Feb 2014 | Format: MP3

£11.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £13.91 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:24
30
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2:29
30
3
2:35
30
4
2:48
30
5
2:53
30
6
2:37
30
7
2:17
30
8
1:44
30
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2:41
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2:41
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11
3:55
30
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1:24
30
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3:41
30
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2:16
30
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4:44
30
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4:43
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4:01
30
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0:42
30
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2:32
30
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1:36
30
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3:46
30
22
0:54
30
23
2:28
30
24
4:38
30
25
1:35
30
26
2:26
30
27
2:01
Disc 2
30
1
4:00
30
2
3:17
30
3
0:51
30
4
2:33
30
5
3:08
30
6
3:12
30
7
3:03
30
8
3:10
30
9
4:02
30
10
1:58
30
11
4:57
30
12
4:42
30
13
2:39
30
14
3:01
30
15
2:36
30
16
4:48


Product details

  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2007 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:06:28
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LP590Y
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 123,590 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By spalanzane on 23 Aug 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
There aren't many studio recordings of Verdi's eleventh opera - just two in fact. On Decca you can hear Dame Joan Sutherland and Franco Bonisolli as Amalia and Carlo, with Matteo Manguerra as Francesco and Samuel Ramey as Massimiliano. Philips, however, have to my mind the more effective cast. Montserrat Caballe and Carlo Bergonzi are very effective as Amalia and Carlo, and Piero Cappuccilli and Ruggero Raimondi can't be bettered.

Amalia was written for the Swedish Nightingale, Jenny Lind, and as such the role has an awful lot of trills and other fioriture that Verdi didn't normally write. Caballe has a very light and agile voice, which seems to be in keeping with Lind - the role keeps to the middle and higher registers of the soprano voice. She is particularly astounding in the opening aria, "Lo sguardo avea degli angeli", which has seemingly effortless decorations.

Carlo Bergonzi is the classic Verdi tenor, and while in parts he seems to be losing his voice (particularly in the act three finale, when a lot of punch is needed in the manner of Domingo) his opening aria, with its martial cabaletta "Nell'agila maledetta", is superb. He is also very beautiful in the act four duet with Raimondi, "Come d'un bacio d'un padre amoroso".

Piero Cappuccilli is likewise the classic Verdi baritone, bringing a lot of Italianate warmth to the role. Sounds odd, bringing warmth to a villain, but Francesco Moor has a lot of really great tunes, and Cappuccilli's voice surrounds them in his burnished tones. He is particularly magnificent in the duet with Caballe in act two, "Io t'amo, Amalia", which is itself a piece with a lot of dramatic shortcomings, but the two make it one of the high points.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER on 7 July 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am always intrigued by the way some of Verdi's earlier operas have remained comparatively neglected both on stage and in the recording studio, although a little close listening and thought will sometimes provide an - if not the - answer.

"I Masnadieri" - Verdi's eleventh, "London" opera - has a lot going for it. Both the two studio recordings so far made are top quality and the opera has many armchair adherents, but the culminating absurdity of our hero stabbing his beloved to spare her the agony of losing him to the bandits (to whom he has sworn eternal fealty) is just too much to swallow. The soprano has much beautiful music written expressly for the vocal talents of Jenny Lind; consequently there is a lot of delicate coloratura and scope for the top end of the voice, but none of those gutsy plunges into the lower register that stiffen the sinews and give a little starch to a rather pale and passive heroine.

As I have said, both recordings are wonderful, if different. One might expect to hear frailties in both Sutherland's and Bergonzi's singing, she being in her mid and he in his early fifties at the times of recording (1982 and 1975 respectively), but both are superb; in fact she is more animated and has a better trill than Caballé and he is more stylish and nuanced than the stentorian Bonisolli. Both sound great, even if he is occasionally a little dry and a hint of a beat obtrudes in Sutherland's top - but these recordings represent the best of their late work. Bonisolli is certainly more exciting than Bergonzi, too; a curiosity is that he and Sutherland are allowed by Bonynge to take ringing top C's (and even a C sharp, in his case) whereas Gardelli has his singers take the rather tame lower, written options all the time.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. G. Theaker on 1 Aug 2009
Format: Audio CD
A splendid performance of an opera that could do with more performances.
Well worth hearing.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
The well-deserved re-release of a classic revelation 29 Aug 2007
By Dr. Ray - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Beginning in the early 70's, Lamberto Gardelli set out to create the first modern/stereo recordings of Verdi's earliest and most neglected works for Phillips, and later, Orfeo. First came I Lombardi, known at the least for its Trio, and "Attila." Then came "Un Giorno di Regno", which featured the relatively unknown (at the time) American soprano, Jessye Norman, and a young tenor, Jose Carreras. All three good recordings, with some very accomplished singing and committed playing/conducting. Then came I Masnadieri, cast perfectly, sung magnificently, and possessing powerful and beautiful music which was virtually unknown at the time; a revelation then and a joy now. Bergonzi is the perfect Verdi tenor, lyric when required, impassioned at other times without become coarse. Caballe is exquisite, spinning one beautiful line after another, while also capable of dramatic involvement. Cappuccilli's character is one of the great snarling baritone roles of Italian opera, who suffers through a condemnation scene towards the end of the opera which is a precursor of the Phillip/Inquisitor scene in Don Carlo years later. Raimondi, John Sandor, and others complete a great cast. The orchestra and chorus are terrific, the conducting is impassioned, and the sound has the terrific punch that Phillips recordings were known for.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Luxuriate In These Voices 26 Aug 2009
By Jan Cambria - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a glorious recording. All of the principles are in such exquisite voice that listening to it for the first time makes me happy I somehow missed it until now. There is not one inadequate musical moment. The cohesion of the singers, players, and conductor makes this rarely performed opera seem to be an overlooked masterpiece. I suppose its neglect is partly due to the rather sadistic plot that has the tenor stabbing his love - in this case the magnificent Caballé - to death because he, himself, has been such a miscreant, through no fault of hers. Fortunately, for the listener,this happens near the conclusion.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Fine performance 3 Jan 2011
By Canzone - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Verdi didn't have much of a libretto to work with ("I'm going to kill you so you won't be sorry when you lose me"....), but he wrote much impressive music for this opera, so if you like "bel canto" Verdi, this one should please. Caballe strains on some of her highest notes, and her glottal stop rears its head every now and then, but overall she is impressive; her coloratura passages are among the best examples of her technique. Bergonzi was getting on in years, but he generally shows why he was the best Verdi tenor of his generation. In comparison, Sutherland's complete recording is quite impressive, but it really should have been recorded much earlier in her career, when the high range was more secure.
One additional note: I'm not sure what CD it might be on now, but if you like this opera, you owe it to yourself to find Sutherland's earlier recording of the "Tu del mio Carlo...Carlo vive" scene, recorded in the mid-60's. I think this is some of the most impressive 'dramatic coloratura' singing ever recorded: the high notes are rock solid, the passagework spectacular, and the trills unmatched. And no droopiness either!
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
One of two great studio recordings 7 July 2010
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I am always intrigued by the way some of Verdi's earlier operas have remained comparatively neglected both on stage and in the recording studio, although a little close listening and thought will sometimes provide an - if not the - answer.

"I Masnadieri" - Verdi's eleventh, "London" opera - has a lot going for it. Both the two studio recordings so far made are top quality and the opera has many armchair adherents, but the culminating absurdity of our hero stabbing his beloved to spare her the agony of losing him to the bandits (to whom he has sworn eternal fealty) is just too much to swallow. The soprano has much beautiful music written expressly for the vocal talents of Jenny Lind; consequently there is a lot of delicate coloratura and scope for the top end of the voice, but none of those gutsy plunges into the lower register that stiffen the sinews and give a little starch to a rather pale and passive heroine.

As I have said, both recordings are wonderful, if different. One might expect to hear frailties in both Sutherland's and Bergonzi's singing, she being in her mid and he in his early fifties at the times of recording (1982 and 1975 respectively), but both are superb; in fact she is more animated and has a better trill than Caballé and he is more stylish and nuanced than the stentorian Bonisolli. Both sound great, even if he is occasionally a little dry and a hint of a beat obtrudes in Sutherland's top - but these recordings represent the best of their late work. Bonisolli is certainly more exciting than Bergonzi, too; a curiosity is that he and Sutherland are allowed by Bonynge to take ringing top C's (and even a C sharp, in his case) whereas Gardelli has his singers take the rather tame lower, written options all the time. Both baritones are top class, although I prefer Manuguerra's more biting tone to Cappuccilli's woollier production; both basses are splendid: Raimondi sounds much more the starved, weakened old man but Ramey's voice is intrinsically more rotund. (Apparently credibility was strained in the first London performance, as the part of Massimiliano was taken by the celebrated and notoriously rotund bass Lablache.) Both choruses and orchestra are unimpeachable - although in the overture the Welsh National Opera's concertante cellist plays more affectingly and with more tender phrasing than his New Philharmonia counterpart. Conversely, Caballé and Bergonzi make a more moving job of their lovely duet "Ma un'iri di pace".

So I cannot separate these two recordings: the Decca is more exciting, the Philips more beautiful in its restraint. I am glad to own both.
0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Great recording 31 Dec 2012
By William J. Hogan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Very happy with the recording but it came poorly packed and badly damaged. Would only use vendor again with reluctance.
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