Ben Ainslie: Close to the Wind and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.81
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Ben Ainslie: Close to The Wind: Autobiography of Britain's Greatest Olympic Sailor Hardcover – 3 Sep 2009


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£0.01


Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Yellow Jersey (3 Sept. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0224082922
  • ISBN-13: 978-0224082921
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 2.2 x 24.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 461,251 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Take it from a neutral observer: the most accomplished competitor at work in British sport today is Ben Ainslie. Chris Hoy, Lewis Hamilton and Rebecca Adlington deserve praise but the real fanfare should be reserved for Ainslie ... [He has] a combination of dedication, stamina, tactical nous and, the clincher here, a sustained level of ruthlessness rarely witnessed before in British sport.' (Henry Winter, Daily Telegraph)

Sailing's superman (The Times)

An interesting self-portrait ... it encapsulates his personality: pleasant and unassuming off the water, ruthless on it (Independent)

Book Description

The world's greatest racing sailor - three-times Olympic champion Ben Ainslie tells his story

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By S. Lindley on 10 Oct. 2009
Format: Hardcover
Yesterday I started (and finished) reading Ben's autobiography, `Close to the Wind'. He covers, in a fairly haphazard order; his Olympic campaigns, duels with Robert Scheidt, Oppie racing, his involvement with various AC campaigns, training, his dislike of Guillaume Florent (cheating Frenchman who's good, but not good enough) and his poor performance at school. Arguably he could have left that last part out - the book's riddled with spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. At least it proves he really did write it himself, I guess. And giving it the same title as Pete Goss' unimaginatively titled book was an odd move.

Throughout the book he's borrowed Dame Ellen's self-conscious, self-deprecating style, though thankfully he's yet to adopt the pained martyr-smile that's the Weepy One's trademark. (Or is it just wind? Should her book have been called "I've Got Wind"?) Anyway, despite all that, it's a great read if you're interested in Olympic sailing, AC sailing or what makes the finest sailor on the planet tick - and, can, cope, with, random, unnecessary, commas - and dashes - everywhere - and sentences that are, frankly, just a bit too long and feature the word - `frankly' - too often.

It would have been great if he'd called it "The Queen's going to have to Knight me in 3 Years", and written the thing via dictaphone whilst out racing when, by his own admission, he's a very different character. I'd have loved to have heard more about incidents and his attitude on the water. The last thing I want to know is that he's a nice guy too. He's obviously not when he's racing!
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Amazon Customer on 17 Dec. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had recently taken up sailing and after admiring Ben's achievements over the years, I thought I would find this interesting. I wasn't disappointed. I really enjoyed it and felt it was an honest read which showed Ben as real person rather than a self congratulating super hero which was a refreshing change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. H. Broom on 15 Jan. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading it but as he appears in his television interviews he doesn't open up as much as other sports people when giving interviews or writing their autobiographies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Laura on 26 Oct. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A great read. Ben does not pull any punches, he writes the same way as he sails ! Hopefully there will another book on the horizon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mnemonic on 25 Jan. 2015
Format: Paperback
This book needs to be updated to include the Americas Cup in San Francisco in 2013
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ratty on 4 Nov. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
As a sailor myself I was very much looking forward to reading about Ben's experience as a youth sailor. Packed with information it was a little hard to get into but after a while it became more steady going. In the book there are hundreds of flashbacks and this is probably why I found it hard to get into. Overall a decent red but not as good as his sailing abilities!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A lover of books on 11 Aug. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Ben Ainslie is a recent discovery to me (thanks to the Olympics) and I was intrigued to read about the man who has won 4 Olympic Gold medals. I wanted to learn about what makes him tick. How he gets his mind into "winning" mode, etc. I'm going to be honest, it didn't quite deliver. Aside from the questionable grammar, it's been written in a very haphazard sort of way, and by that I mean, it jumps around a lot without going into too much detail. I would have loved it if Ben had gone into a little more detail.

However, upon saying that, I still found it an enjoyable read. I'm not into sailing so do not be put off reading this book if you're not a sailor.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By mangilli-climpson m on 28 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After great sporting events new books appear, and readers are lucky that this updated autobiography first written in 2009 makes a pleasant re-appearance for those who missed his story the first time round.

Ben Ainslie is Briton's top sailing Olympian, son of the skipper of the first Whitbread Round the World race of 1973, and godson of Robin Knox-Johnson's racing friend Les Williams. He takes us from his early days on a voyage of self-discovery and a passion for the sea. It is also a review of his chameleon manners: shy, pacific on land, and wild and risk-taking on the sea, as he declared furiously during the first week of London Olympics at Weymouth, when not performing as was expected, that his rivals Hogh-Christensen and Lobert from Denmark and France had made a grave mistake to make him angry. He admits now it was a ploy at mind-games, something untried by him until then, but like all sportsmen he wanted as much of the right publicity as possible.

From his early days he has always sailed first in the Optimist class, then in the Laser, winning the World youth ISAF championships in 1995, before becoming the youngest British sailor of any Olympic squad at 18 at the Atlanta Games, taking part around Savannah. He surprised everyone after a terrible first race by coming away with the silver medal, behind the Brazilian Robert Scheidt. He did not wish simply to participate, as there was no guarantee that there would be a second chance. He wished to prove as the then great Steve Redgrave used to say, "If you don't travel to win, you're just a tourist".
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback