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Behold The Man (S.F. MASTERWORKS) Paperback – 11 Nov 1999


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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; New Ed edition (11 Nov 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857988485
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857988482
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 127,957 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4.3 out of 5 stars
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Feb 2002
Format: Paperback
In his interviw about this book Moorcock says he kept the sci-fi to a minimum because he didn't want readers to get bogged down in extraneous detail. He was not interested in 'rationales' of how the time machine worked but what the time machine might represent symbolically (a womb, a
rebirth) and this is obvious from his description of the machine. If this didn't have its sci-fi element my guess it would be a famous literary classic because it's a whole lot more subtle and interesting than Last Temptation of Christ or that Dennis Potter play about Christ, which I think had the same title. It is the book's continuing power, which hit me as a young man. It isn't intended to shake your faith in religion. It's intended to make you question your faith in everything! Nice and short, too.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 April 2001
Format: Paperback
...Not the worst, either! Moorcock never seems to write very long works. Even by his standards, this seems quite short, and yet he covers a great deal of ground therein. I am not an unequivocal admirer of Moorcock. His books, invariably, are odd. As I type, I listen to his album (New World's Fair), also odd. Usually his books are thick with outlandish imagery (the various Eternal Champions, for instance), though they're not necessarily particularly strong on plot & story. When I finally got around to reading his most famous series, the Elric books, I found them quite disappointing.
However, having read much of his work; Erekose, Corum, Hawkmoon, Elric amongst others; this is one of his oddest. Forget the acid-trip imagery, there's none of it here. It's a very plausible lateral interpretation of the bible stories of christ (one that's likely to be unwelcome to the devout, I might add!), and, for all it's brevity, a thoroughly absorbing read. Langford's review should tell you all you need to know of the plot to get you interested, hopefully this will provide any extra impetus you need to actually read it - it'll repay your effort.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Hole VINE VOICE on 4 Dec 2002
Format: Paperback
This has, no doubt, been widely read by SF lovers. First published in 1969, it won the Nebula award for best novella. It is quite a quick read - even the number of pages exaggerate its length.
I made the mistake of reading the blurb on the back cover before I bought the book. Unfortunately, this told me the plot up to page 145, so there were no surprises for me!
So what's it about without giving away everything? Karl Glogauer has the opportunity to travel in time using a time machine invented by a crank scientist. He decides to go to Palestine in 29 AD so that he can watch the crucifixion. The story builds up the events leading to this decision at the same time as following Glogauer's progress in the past.
I enjoyed this story... as a non-religous person I am all in favour of this type of alternative look at religous history.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By zargb5 on 27 Jun 2009
Format: Paperback
I've read this novella a couple of times. it is the only Moorcock novel i ever managed to finish. I could never get into any of his other stories at all. This is an excellent read and well worth inclusion into the master works series. It's a great pity Monty Python's life of brian didn't take more of the risks that this novel takes. They kind of backed down from the main issues somewhat and lost their nerve. This doesn't.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ms. K. Tostevin on 15 Oct 2009
Format: Paperback
This is not a book I would have chosen to read, but I'm delighted that it was recommended to me. I am currently writing a dissertation on Religion and Literature; I am focusing on novels that rewrite religious texts.
Moorcock's novel is very readable. The story focusses on Karl, a man who has a time machine and decides to travel back in time to the time of the New Testament. Karl has a distorted past, his view of the Bible is screwed-up by past experiences. Karl's story is, in some ways, similar to Roth's character Portnoy's.
When Karl travels back he meets John the Baptist and discovers much of the Bible remains true to the facts, however there is one key element that is absent: Krl can not find Jesus and no one knows who he is! You'll have to read to discover whether Karl finds Jesus... I don't want to spoil the text for you! I highly recommend this book; especially if you're interested in the differences between the historical Jesus and the Gospel's accounts of Christ.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 22 Feb 2000
Format: Paperback
As much a symbolic piece of the age and atmosphere it was written in. Moorcock was one of the primary voices of "New Worlds" and this novel, along with the works of Langdon Jones, Disch et al, and the shamefully unknown David I. Masson, helped to create a more open forum for the science fiction arena. Very British and daring in its scope and surprisingly it isn't Moorcock's best work. The ending and the quasi-sequels to this work let down the original concept through -what appears to me- a certain apathy. However, I do recommend it as a nostalgic reminder of the last real sci-fi revolution.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Feb 2000
Format: Paperback
Most of Moorcock's books are wild fantasy, but this one really touches on something profound, and not just from a religious point but also as a comment on mankind's search for meaning. Christians may find the book offensive in first reading, but you must look for the deeper meaning to understand what it's all about. This is one of the unexpected greats.
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