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Behold the Dawn Paperback – 24 Aug 2009

11 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 330 pages
  • Publisher: PenForASword Publishing (24 Aug. 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0978924614
  • ISBN-13: 978-0978924614
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.1 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,376,483 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

K.M. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. She is the IPPY and NIEA Award-winning and internationally published author of the Amazon bestsellers Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel, as well as the western A Man Called Outlaw, the medieval epic Behold the Dawn, and the epic fantasy Dreamlander. When she's not making things up, she's busy mentoring other authors on her award-winning blog http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com. She makes her home in western Nebraska. Find out more about her fiction at http://www.kmweiland.com.

Product Description

About the Author

K.M. Weiland lives in make-believe worlds, talks to imaginary friends, and survives primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. She is the internationally published author of the Amazon bestsellers Outlining Your Novel and Structuring Your Novel, as well as the western A Man Called Outlaw, the medieval epic Behold the Dawn, and the epic fantasy Dreamlander. When she’s not making things up, she’s busy mentoring other authors on her site helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com. She makes her home in western Nebraska. Find out more about her fiction at kmweiland.com.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Effrosyni Moschoudi on 18 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I am not a fan of this genre but this author came highly recommended by a friend so when I got a chance to acquire a copy of this book in return for a review, I seized the opportunity. I was impressed by the representation of the era and I believe the author did a great job there and obviously had to do a lot of research. Although K.M. Weiland has undoubtedly great writing skills (especially where descriptions and character development are concerned), I found some elements in this book were quite weak. The language for one; although I wouldn't expect it to be original for this era (for who would be able to read and comprehend it anyway even if the author could speak it!) there were some words that struck me as odd, such as Annan calling his servant 'Boyo' or 'Bucko". I also have the impression that 'Boyo' is a Welsh word while Annan is Scottish.

The romance came across as quite soppy, in the style of a Harlequin romance which is okay if you are a fan of the genre but I didn't expect the relevant clichés in a historical novel. I did enjoy the camaraderie between Annan and his delightful servant, Marek who was by far the most likeable character in the book. Annan is clearly a man tortured by guilt over the sins of his past but I didn't manage to relate to him much. The object of his desire, Lady Mairead, was very likeable but the romance developed in a predictable way, without any surprises. Also, I found the many references to her lip getting stuck between her teeth quite annoying and if anything, not a sight I'd expect from a Lady.

Summing up, a good read, especially for those who enjoy medieval adventures. Maybe this is because it's not my genre but other than the fun conversations between Annan and Marek, I found nothing else there that I deem memorable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter Adamson on 15 Sept. 2014
Format: Paperback
Behold The Dawn was well researched, but I found some of the dialogue jarring - bucko, bloke - because it didn't appear to relate to the period. If a writer is going to use Scottish vernacular, then snippets do not work for me.

When I read a book that is written in English, I expect any non-English sentences, phrases, etc, to be translated, either through internalisation, dialogue or narrative. I hit the first non-English piece that wasn't translated in Chapter 1 and a couple of others in Chapter 2. I almost gave up on reading the book because of the frustration of being brought to a glaring halt. However, I persevered, and glad I did, because all other non-English usage was explained.

The story itself had all the elements one wishes to comes across when reading: history, intrigue, love, betrayal, murder, mystery, action, but I did struggle with the Baptist being able to be everywhere and anywhere. I looked for cause and effect with regard to how the Baptist was able to keep track of Annan et al and I felt this was not adequately explained, particularly when they were tracked down to the Hermit.

The story was told through the eyes of the characters, which is always a plus; because to be able to do this you have to be good at characterisation. Save for some of the dialogue, Weiland done a good job of creating believable characters (save for the Baptist being everywhere and anywhere).

All in all, I enjoyed the read and I expect that Weiland will continue to master her craft as she writes more books.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ursula K. Raphael TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 15 Aug. 2010
Format: Paperback
This is historical fiction that takes place during the Crusades, set in "the Holy Land" in 1192, blending fact and fiction with detailed descriptions. The story begins in Bari, Italy, from the point of view of a Scottish tourneyer named Marcus Annan. His traveling companion, Peregrine Marek, is indentured to him after Annan saved his life in Glasgow, and Marek believes Annan would be better off seeking absolution in the Third Crusade.

After a tournament, Annan is approached by a monk known as The Baptist. This monk tells the tourneyer he must bring the man called Matthias of Claidmore to the Holy Land to confront Bishop Roderic about the crimes committed at St. Dunstan's Abbey, sixteen years ago. Annan informs The Baptist that Matthias is dead; the monk suggests that the Earl of Keaton may also have knowledge of Roderic's unholy transgressions which puts him in danger of the Bishop.

Annan reluctantly makes the pilgrimage, but refuses to seek absolution by taking the oath of a Crusader, despite Marek's insistence to ask God's forgiveness. When Annan does find the Earl, he is asked to protect the Earl's wife, Mairead, from the Norman knight, Hugh de Guerrant, who is one of the Bishop Roderic's corrupt knights. It soon becomes apparent that Countess of Keaton's enemies are also Annan's. With the help of Marek, the tourneyer attempts to take Mairead to safety before the Bishop has all of them killed.

Weiland uses the flowery language of historical adventure, and the thoughts of multiple characters, to underscore the Christian themes of that period in history. It is a tale of betrayal and redemption that ascends time and location while remaining anchored against the backdrop of the Crusades.
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