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Beginning JSP Web Development (Programmer to programmer) [Paperback]

Jayson Falkner , Ben Galbraith , Romin Irani , Casey Kochmer , Perrumal Krishnaraj , Meeraj Moidoo Kunnumpurath , Sathya Narayana Panduranga , John Timney
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

1 Aug 2001 1861002092 978-1861002099
JavaServer Pages (JSP) is an increasingly popular technology for building dynamic web applications that can access databases and provide an interactive experience for your site's users. JSP is built on top of the Java programming language, and so this book will teach you both JSP itself and the fundamentals of Java.

You'll learn how the web works and how JSP fits in, how to get input from the user and create web pages "on the fly", how JavaBeans components and tag libraries allow you to make your code more readable and easier to maintain, and of course how the Java language itself works. The book also covers how to handle errors in your code, the best ways of designing web applications, and rounds up with a comprehensive case study - a web site for a local tourism authority.

This book covers:
How to install Java and JSP/Servlets

How to create dynamic web sites with JavaServer Pages (JSP)

Object-oriented programming in Java

Java's core utility and input/output classes

How to use and create JSP Tag Libraries

Best practices in designing web applications with Java

Relational database access with MySQL and JDBC

Using the popular Struts framework to simplify application design

Includes frequent worked examples, including an in-depth case study


Product details

  • Paperback: 863 pages
  • Publisher: WROX Press Ltd (1 Aug 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861002092
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861002099
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 18.5 x 4.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 407,012 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Amazon Review

Ideal for anyone new to JavaServer Pages (JSPs), Beginning JSP Web Development offers an excellent and thorough guide to using JSPs effectively. Combining a tutorial of basic Java with excellent practical material on using Tomcat and related tools, this book will fill a valuable niche for anyone wanting to build Web applications the right way using some of the latest standards in today's Java.

Learning JSPs today requires not only a basic knowledge of Java, but also practical advice for using Tomcat, custom tag libraries, database programming and other standards. This title distinguishes itself with chapter-by-chapter coverage of all you need to program with JSPs. For those new to Java, introductory material on data types, flow control, and basic class design will help you learn essential Java. The authors also present practical advice and samples for installing and configuring Tomcat (an open source JSP/servlet engine), including advice on deployment options. Sections on database and JDBC programming, servlets and session management supplement the basics of using JSPs with embedded Java scriptlets.

Standout material on JSP custom tag libraries will justify the price of this book for many readers (including those with previous Java experience, but little JSP exposure). Several sections on designing and deploying custom tag libraries show you how to make use of this powerful new Sun standard. The text closes with leading-edge material on the new Struts Web application framework, including a worthwhile case study for an online travel database using this pre-packaged codebase as a starting point. Sun has endorsed Struts and other application frameworks as a "best practice" when building JSP-based applications, and the authors do a good job showing off this solution, including advice on configuration options.

With JSPs evolving into an even more powerful and flexible Web solution using custom tag libraries and other standards, this book fits the bill with an up-to-the-minute and approachable tour of exactly what any developer needs to use JSPs productively in real projects. --Richard Dragan

From the Publisher

This book is for anyone who knows HTML can use this book - no previous programming experience is required, and you will learn both JavaServer Pages (JSP) and the Java language on which it is based. This book is also suitable for more experienced programmers who need an introduction to Java and web programming. All the code can be used on either a Windows or a UNIX (e.g. Linux) system.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I bought this book on the back of "Profession PHP Programming" by Wrox. With that book, I was very impressed with the approach, layout and easy to follow "real world" examples. I was up and running with PHP in no time. THIS BOOK WAS EVEN BETTER. If you want to know how to programme in JSP then this is the one. All the examples are clear and easy to follow (and they all work). I hate books which throw out examples and leave you in mid air trying to figure out what's going on. Each example is explained clearly line by line. The book deals with Scriplets, Beans, Tag Libraries, Sessions, Database access, introduces the Struts framework etc. and climaxes with an excellent case study in building a Tourist Web application.
Only down side would be for absolute beginners with no knowledge in Java. Although the Java is not too deep, some of the examples would be hard to follow if you're a complete novice and have never seen a line of Java before.
I have now placed my order for the next one in the series "Profession JSP Site design", not yet published. Hurry up Wrox!.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
This book is an excellent way of rapidly getting up to speed with JSP. The book's philosophy is as simple as it is effective. The 'hello world' application is delivered simply and quickly. It is then extended, and it's problems noted. Cue the next change - another feature explained and used. And so it goes on. JSP, Servlets, Tag Libraries, Struts, you name it. The authors use a very gentle, handholding, evolutionary approach. In spite of there being several authors of the book, each chapter leads naturally to the next. For a "Beginning" book, it has impressive width and depth. 10/10. I fully intend to look for "Programmer to Programmer" books in future - I'm fed up wasting time and money on academics ramblings. You want real world? Get Wrox. It's as simple as that.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good introduction to JSP 24 Nov 2003
Format:Paperback
I found this a very useful introduction to JSP, coming from a programming background I only looked briefly at the initial few chapters, which provide a guide to programming from scratch, but these seemed useful and informative as all of the Wrox 'Beginning' titles are. I would imagine a complete beginner would have little problem following the book which is also useful for intermediate level programmers as it goes a little further than most other pure beginners titles.
The book covers all of the basics you would expect with JSPs: JavaBeans, Tag Libraries, database connectivity, Email etc. But it also goes a little further in the later chapters when the Struts Framework is introduced. The only problem I have with the Wrox series is that they are very wordy and this book is no exception.
For complete beginners I would recommend Mike McGrath’s ‘JSP in easy steps’ which I discovered after I had been using this book for a while. McGrath seems to give you as much, or nearly as much, as the Wrox series in about 1/10 of the page volume and for the price and I think provides the perfect introduction to JSP. Having said that ‘Beginning JSP Web Development’ is very good in its own right and I have found it extremely useful for the more intermediate programming tasks.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Beginners Book 11 Sep 2002
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A great hands-on book about programming in JSP, it assumes no knowledge of Java and explains in detail all the Java you need to program on the server side. All jargon is fully explained before being used and each chapter builds on and reinforces the stuff you've already seen.
It assumes some basic HTML knowledge. Written in an easy-to-read step-by-step style, it tells you how to set up Java and Tomcat your Windows or Unix machine to run the examples and, so far, all the examples have worked flawlessly.
It makes a great server side companion to Beginning Java 2 also by Wrox.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  15 reviews
40 of 40 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 800 Pages of Solid Introduction to JSP (and Java) 16 Sep 2001
By Kevin Carlson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
As an experienced web developer who wants to learn JSP and Java, this book maintains just the right pace for me. I'd been trying to teach myself Java using other books, but needed a focus and frame of reference to make the study interesting.
This book provides that. The Java and JSP are woven together in a practical and digestible fashion.
I'd give it five stars, but for the occasional typos in code samples (several in Chapter 7) which cause compile or runtime errors. For a beginner, it can be frustrating to identify the source of errors and make the necessary corrections without having prior experience with the language. Still, not bad for a first edition. ...
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Super Book and a good class text 27 Dec 2001
By Danny Creagan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Lots of good practical information with easily understandable explanations. I liked this a whole lot. It was much better than the Core Servlets book by Hall (mainly because it is up-to-date).
I'm using it as a class text book. It starts from scratch and gets into almost all features. Just what the doctor ordered.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Editor should be ashamed 9 Dec 2002
By Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Thanks to everyone who mentioned the numerous errors in this book in their reviews. I only wish I had read them before buying the book. Not only is it full of every type of error you can think of, it is also poorly organized with a heavy-duty chapter on tag libraries sandwiched between otherwise introductory material. Also, the last half of the book is meant to be a case study but the sections are pasted together with little or no indication as to what is part of the case study and what is an overall observation making it impossible to follow along. If you do buy the book (and I recommend you don't) print out the errata list from their website -- it'll save you hours of frustration. However, don't expect it to be complete.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good but needs more examples 8 Dec 2002
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is a solid introduction that covers all the key basics. Be aware that over half the book is spent teaching Java, not JSP. Since I already know the basics of java, the numerous Java chapters were a distraction to the main point of JSP/Servlet programming. Also, being a beginner to JSP, I have to agree with an earlier reviewer that the book hurries on to each next chapter with only the barest of examples to illustrate the topic, and usually the examples are just "toys". You have to wait until the end of the book where two chapters are devoted to developing a realistic web application. The result is that you don't get a chance, as you go along, to really practice a concept and see it in various contexts. Also, I like to get into database access early in a book, since using a database is the main point of a web application. In this one, you have to wait until near the end before you learn how. Aside from these caveats, the book is clearly written, the concepts are well explained, and it covers the subject quite well.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good books - lots of errors! 13 May 2002
By Jessica M Grant - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I'm about halfway through the book and feel like I'm gaining a lot of knowledge. I think this book is teaching me all the things I need to know to successfully work with JSP.
However, the book is filled with errors! I have resorted to keeping the "Book Errata" webpage up on my computer and checking it first if I have a problem with an example or understanding a point. It's a real pain to pour over a piece a code that isn't working assuming I've made a typo only to realize the book is wrong! I realize there will always be some mistakes, but the ones in this book are very frequent.
Bottom line: I don't think the errors negatively impact the usefulness of the book, but they sure are annoying. Beware!
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