Or
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.

See Wishlist
Beethoven: The Symphonies - Reflections
 
See larger image
 

Beethoven: The Symphonies - Reflections

24 Sep 2013 | Format: MP3

38.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 39.95 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
Provided by Amazon EU Srl. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations. Complete your purchase of the CD album to save the MP3 version to your Amazon music library.
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
1
8:23
2
7:23
3
3:20
4
5:44
5
11:22
6
11:10
7
9:34
8
3:30
9
6:33
10
9:00
Disc 2
1
17:01
2
12:46
3
5:44
4
12:18
5
12:09
Disc 3
1
11:17
2
8:52
3
5:49
4
7:09
5
7:00
6
8:57
7
4:54
8
10:38
9
5:44
10
4:49
Disc 4
1
11:56
2
11:44
3
5:11
4
3:35
5
10:07
6
21:47
Disc 5
1
14:11
2
8:15
3
8:42
4
8:58
5
11:58
6
9:33
7
3:51
8
4:35
9
7:59
Disc 6
1
15:04
2
11:48
3
12:38
4
23:52


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 24 Sep 2013
  • Number of Discs: 6
  • Label: BR-Klassik
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 BR-Klassik
  • Total Length: 6:56:50
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00F4CTABE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 179,245 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
2 years on from set of these symphonies by Thielemann and the VPO the virtues of which I extolled in my review comes a new set by one of the pre-eminent conductors of this era and played by one of the greatest orchestras before the listening public not just today, but at any time.

Any conductor presenting such a set is on a hiding to nothing-there will inevitably be comparisons with recordings by the likes of Furtwangler and Toscanini and in the modern era, Karajan (times 4), Klemperer, Schmidt-Isserstedt, Cluytens, Haitink, Rattle, Abbado, Chailly, Harnoncourt and Bohm to name but a smattering and that's without straying into HIP territory (which I would only do if I fell through the back of the wardrobe!).

The reaction to this set will depend on what the listener expects from recordings of these often performed symphonies-if you are looking for revelatory performances which uncover new and challenging aspects of these works then this set will not be to your taste.
If you are happy for the recordings to be revelatory of the genius of Beethoven, and not to emerge as "Karajan's Beethoven", "Klemperer's Beethoven" or whoever's-but rather "Beethoven's Beethoven" then you will enjoy these performances as much as I have.

The recordings were made throughout 2012 at a series of concerts in the Herkulessaal in Munich, and in the majority of cases, the renowned Suntory Hall in Tokyo (only 3 &6 are from Munich). There is very little difference in the acoustics captured from each venue, and a "spot the difference" exercise would be really difficult.
The "extras", to which I will return, were all recorded separately in Munich in different years.
Read more ›
13 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. H. Morton on 8 Mar 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
These Beethoven symphonies are beautifully performed and recorded and show Mariss Janssons at his best. The additional works are perhaps a matter of taste.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 14 Jan 2014
Format: Audio CD
Beethoven had every right to make the same comment that Nietzsche made of himself: I am dynamite. His address - understood as both trajectory and target - can only be described as prophetic. When I am next in the Sistine Chapel, I expect to see that Michelangelo has allocated a spandrel to him beside the likes of Amos, Ezekiel and Isaiah.

Here in Janson's cycle of the symphonies, zeitgeist has prevailed again. Our society is deeply suspicious of big, heroic gestures. Admittedly, they were the undoing of so many in the Twentieth Century. Metaphysics stinks in a pluralist, secular society. In response, the likes of Zinman, Abbado (thrice!!!) and Rattle serve up a sleek, energetic, eco-friendly Beethoven where there is no moral imperative in the slipstream to change one's life or cross the Alps with Bonaparte. Add Janssons to their ranks. This cycle is beautifully played (even if there is no extra torque at key junctures). Recording-wise, it is astounding. The fizzer of a Ninth aside, I enjoy it. It's nice and dramatic. Outside these parameters, it means nothing. Here today and gone thereafter with no resonance. It should be increasingly hard to listen to the Eroica as one ages and dies as a liegeman of suburbia. Here, depressingly, is another exception to the rule. Perhaps Happy Acres can play it over the public-address system to gee up the old buggers, aplay at bingo.

Consider this. Furtwangler's Beethoven 9th from 1942 is a conflagration of suns; the last two movements of Uncle Otto's Beethoven Fourth from 1958 are the `barbaric yamp' of legend; the Fifth from `Karajan in Moscow' is reparation for Barbarossa. Antediluvian though I be, I want a Beethoven who tells me to live big; fight hard; love hotly; hate heatedly and rejoice exceedingly.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search