Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £38.99

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Beethoven: Symphonies and Reflections [Mariss Jansons, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra] [BR Klassik:900119] Box set


Price: £33.52 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
16 new from £28.28 1 used from £56.12

Frequently Bought Together

Beethoven: Symphonies and Reflections [Mariss Jansons, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra] [BR Klassik:900119] + Brahms: The Symphonies
Price For Both: £51.27

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Conductor: Mariss Jansons
  • Composer: Beethoven
  • Audio CD (7 Oct 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 6
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: BR Klassik
  • ASIN: B00E9HG1NK
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 94,261 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         


Disc 1:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op. 21: I. Adagio molto - Allegro con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 8:23Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op. 21: II. Andante cantabile con motoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 7:23£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op. 21: III. Menuetto - Allegro molto e vivaceBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 3:20£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 1 in C Major, Op. 21: IV. Adagio - Allegro moltoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 5:44£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. ManiaiBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra11:22Album Only
Listen  6. Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 36: I. Adagio molto - Allegro moltoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra11:10Album Only
Listen  7. Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 36: II. LarghettoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 9:34Album Only
Listen  8. Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 36: III. ScherzoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 3:30£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 36: IV. Allegro moltoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 6:33£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen10. NiraiBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 9:00Album Only


Disc 2:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat Major, Op. 55, "Eroica": I. Allegro con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra17:01Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat Major, Op. 55, "Eroica": II. Marcia funebre: Adagio assaiBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra12:46Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat Major, Op. 55, "Eroica": III. Scherzo: Allegro vivaceBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 5:44£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat Major, Op. 55, "Eroica": IV. Finale: Allegro moltoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra12:18Album Only
Listen  5. Beethovens Heiligenstadter TestamentBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra12:09Album Only


Disc 3:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 4 in B-Flat Major, Op. 60: I. Adagio - Allegro vivaceBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra11:17Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 4 in B-Flat Major, Op. 60: II. AdagioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 8:52Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 4 in B-Flat Major, Op. 60: III. Menuetto: Allegro vivaceBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 5:49£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 4 in B-Flat Major, Op. 60: IV. Allegro ma non troppoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 7:09£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Op. 67: I. Allegro con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 7:00£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Op. 67: II. Andante con motoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 8:57Album Only
Listen  7. Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Op. 67: III. AllegroBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 4:54£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Op. 67: IV. AllegroBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra10:38Album Only
Listen  9. Fires: I. MisteriosoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 5:44£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Fires: II. Con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 4:49£0.59  Buy MP3 


Disc 4:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68, "Pastoral": I. Awakening of Cheerful Feelings Upon Arrival in the Country: Allegro ma non troppoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra11:56Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68, "Pastoral": II. Scene by the Brook: Andante molto mossoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra11:44Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68, "Pastoral": III. Merry Gathering of Country Folk: AllegroBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 5:11£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68, "Pastoral": IV. Thunderstorm: AllegroBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 3:35£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68, "Pastoral": V. Shepherd's Song: Happy and Thankful Feelings after the Storm: AllegrettoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra10:07Album Only
Listen  6. DixiBavarian Radio Chorus21:47Album Only


Disc 5:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92: I. Poco sostenuto - VivaceBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra14:11Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92: II. AllegrettoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 8:15Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92: III. Presto, assai meno prestoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 8:42Album Only
Listen  4. Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92: IV. Allegro con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 8:58Album Only
Listen  5. Con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra11:58Album Only
Listen  6. Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: I. Allegro vivace e con brioBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 9:33Album Only
Listen  7. Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: II. Allegretto scherzandoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 3:51£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: III. Tempo di menuettoBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 4:35£0.59  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: IV. Allegro vivaceBavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra 7:59£0.59  Buy MP3 


Disc 6:

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125, "Choral": I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestosoChristiane Karg15:04Album Only
Listen  2. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125, "Choral": II. Molto vivaceChristiane Karg11:48Album Only
Listen  3. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125, "Choral": III. Adagio molto e cantabile - Andante moderatoChristiane Karg12:38Album Only
Listen  4. Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, Op. 125, "Choral": IV. Finale: Presto - Allegro assaiChristiane Karg23:52Album Only

Product Description

Product Description

Christiane Karg, soprano - Mihoko Fujimura, alto - Michael Schade, ténor - Michael Volle, baryton - Chor und Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks - Mariss Jansons, direction

Review

This is one of those rare occasions when one is left with a feeling of having been in the presence of the thing itself. RECORDING OF THE MONTH --Gramophone, Dec'13

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
2 years on from set of these symphonies by Thielemann and the VPO the virtues of which I extolled in my review comes a new set by one of the pre-eminent conductors of this era and played by one of the greatest orchestras before the listening public not just today, but at any time.

Any conductor presenting such a set is on a hiding to nothing-there will inevitably be comparisons with recordings by the likes of Furtwangler and Toscanini and in the modern era, Karajan (times 4), Klemperer, Schmidt-Isserstedt, Cluytens, Haitink, Rattle, Abbado, Chailly, Harnoncourt and Bohm to name but a smattering and that's without straying into HIP territory (which I would only do if I fell through the back of the wardrobe!).

The reaction to this set will depend on what the listener expects from recordings of these often performed symphonies-if you are looking for revelatory performances which uncover new and challenging aspects of these works then this set will not be to your taste.
If you are happy for the recordings to be revelatory of the genius of Beethoven, and not to emerge as "Karajan's Beethoven", "Klemperer's Beethoven" or whoever's-but rather "Beethoven's Beethoven" then you will enjoy these performances as much as I have.

The recordings were made throughout 2012 at a series of concerts in the Herkulessaal in Munich, and in the majority of cases, the renowned Suntory Hall in Tokyo (only 3 &6 are from Munich). There is very little difference in the acoustics captured from each venue, and a "spot the difference" exercise would be really difficult.
The "extras", to which I will return, were all recorded separately in Munich in different years.
Read more ›
13 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. H. Morton on 8 Mar 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
These Beethoven symphonies are beautifully performed and recorded and show Mariss Janssons at his best. The additional works are perhaps a matter of taste.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon on 14 Jan 2014
Format: Audio CD
Beethoven had every right to make the same comment that Nietzsche made of himself: I am dynamite. His address - understood as both trajectory and target - can only be described as prophetic. When I am next in the Sistine Chapel, I expect to see that Michelangelo has allocated a spandrel to him beside the likes of Amos, Ezekiel and Isaiah.

Here in Janson's cycle of the symphonies, zeitgeist has prevailed again. Our society is deeply suspicious of big, heroic gestures. Admittedly, they were the undoing of so many in the Twentieth Century. Metaphysics stinks in a pluralist, secular society. In response, the likes of Zinman, Abbado (thrice!!!) and Rattle serve up a sleek, energetic, eco-friendly Beethoven where there is no moral imperative in the slipstream to change one's life or cross the Alps with Bonaparte. Add Janssons to their ranks. This cycle is beautifully played (even if there is no extra torque at key junctures). Recording-wise, it is astounding. The fizzer of a Ninth aside, I enjoy it. It's nice and dramatic. Outside these parameters, it means nothing. Here today and gone thereafter with no resonance. It should be increasingly hard to listen to the Eroica as one ages and dies as a liegeman of suburbia. Here, depressingly, is another exception to the rule. Perhaps Happy Acres can play it over the public-address system to gee up the old buggers, aplay at bingo.

Consider this. Furtwangler's Beethoven 9th from 1942 is a conflagration of suns; the last two movements of Uncle Otto's Beethoven Fourth from 1958 are the `barbaric yamp' of legend; the Fifth from `Karajan in Moscow' is reparation for Barbarossa. Antediluvian though I be, I want a Beethoven who tells me to live big; fight hard; love hotly; hate heatedly and rejoice exceedingly.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Unfussy, beautiful and powerful by turns, this gloriously played and recorded set now tops the charts for modern sets 4 Jan 2014
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
2 years on from set of these symphonies by Thielemann and the VPO the virtues of which I extolled in my review comes a new set by one of the pre-eminent conductors of this era and played by one of the greatest orchestras before the listening public not just today, but at any time.

Any conductor presenting such a set is on a hiding to nothing-there will inevitably be comparisons with recordings by the likes of Furtwangler and Toscanini and in the modern era, Karajan (times 4), Klemperer, Schmidt-Isserstedt, Cluytens, Haitink, Rattle, Abbado, Chailly, Harnoncourt and Bohm to name but a smattering and that's without straying into HIP territory (which I would only do if I fell through the back of the wardrobe!).

The reaction to this set will depend on what the listener expects from recordings of these often performed symphonies-if you are looking for revelatory performances which uncover new and challenging aspects of these works then this set will not be to your taste.
If you are happy for the recordings to be revelatory of the genius of Beethoven, and not to emerge as "Karajan's Beethoven", "Klemperer's Beethoven" or whoever's-but rather "Beethoven's Beethoven" then you will enjoy these performances as much as I have.

The recordings were made throughout 2012 at a series of concerts in the Herkulessaal in Munich, and in the majority of cases, the renowned Suntory Hall in Tokyo (only 3 &6 are from Munich). There is very little difference in the acoustics captured from each venue, and a "spot the difference" exercise would be really difficult.
The "extras", to which I will return, were all recorded separately in Munich in different years.

In my review of the Thielemann set, my main comparison was with the highly regarded set by Chailly earlier in 2012 in which Chailly used a smaller orchestra of modern instruments but adopted tempi near to Beethoven's own metronome markings with breathtaking-and breathless- results.
Thielemann's much broader approach was more to my taste, though even my eyebrows were raised at the grand and imperious Seventh which was stately but not lively.
Jansons is nearer to the approach of Chailly-note that I say nearer, not near-for his tempi are in general swifter, his rhythms more sprightly, and the works are propelled with more momentum than by Thielemann.

Jansons is a highly regarded interpreter of Haydn, and so the first 2 symphonies sparkle and dance most affectingly. The 3rd is powerful and dramatic with the most beautiful playing since Karajan-the Horn Trio brings tears to the eyes. The 4th is perfectly balanced, the 5th is well pointed, highly dramatic and with a breakneck finale. The 6th is just glorious, opening at a relaxed and flowing tempo reminiscent of Cluytens and the glorious Giulini recording of the 1960's, but picks up and ultimately recalls the famous recording by Bohm more than any other-indeed, it is the Bohm cycle which is perhaps the closest in character to this one (certainly NOT the Thielemann as suggested by SFL in his review ).

The Seventh is what it should be-the epitome of the dance-and has all the bounce and sparkle eschewed by Thielemann in his version, with a second movement of momentous power and drama to offset the gaiety, the Eighth is the charming hors-d'oeuvre to the entrée of the Ninth, which is beautifully balanced with a stirring finale and for once has excellent soloists drawn from the ranks of the companies of Munich and Vienna.
The playing is exquisite and virtuosic throughout-I heard no lapses-and the rich warmth of this orchestra sounds "just right"-I didn't miss my beloved VPO at any point.
With glorious recording, I would have to give this set the nod over the Thielemann.
However, we are not finished yet-for there are "extras" as I hinted earlier, and these are not the usual Overtures or Ruins of Athens, but contemporary works commissioned to reflect each composer's reactions and impressions to a chosen symphony.

Most listeners will like me be familiar with the names at least and probably the music of Schedrin, Kancheli and Widmann, but names such as Staud and Mochizuki and the unpronounceable Serksnyte are likely to be unfamiliar.
All of the music is approachable, and indeed the Kancheli is actually enjoyable though I struggle to see the relation to Beethoven, and many will find these to be valuable additions.
I'm bound to observe that I don't think they illuminate the symphonies which apparently inspired them, and I certainly don't want to hear them as they are presented, interspersed between the symphonies, but they can be accessed separately of course and many will no doubt enjoy them more than I do. I will return to them on occasion.

If I apply the description "conservative" to this Beethoven set, it is intended as a compliment.
These naturally flowing interpretations allow the music of Beethoven to speak to us in an unfussy, unmannered and totally convincing way, and with playing of breathtaking beauty and superb recording, they now form my top choice among modern recordings. The modern additions are either a welcome bonus or irrelevant dependent on your taste.

Classic versions already mentioned hold their place of course, but this handsomely presented 6 CD set in BR Klassik's usual livery and with extensive notes is offered at mid-price, and warrants a firm 5 Stars. Wholly recommended. Stewart Crowe.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Diet Beethoven or Beethoven Zero - it all amounts to the Same Thing 14 Jan 2014
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Beethoven had every right to make the same comment that Nietzsche made of himself: I am dynamite. His address - understood as both trajectory and target - can only be described as prophetic. When I am next in the Sistine Chapel, I expect to see that Michelangelo has allocated a spandrel to him beside the likes of Amos, Ezekiel and Isaiah.

Here in Janson's cycle of the symphonies, zeitgeist has prevailed again. Our society is deeply suspicious of big, heroic gestures. Admittedly, they were the undoing of so many in the Twentieth Century. Metaphysics stinks in a pluralist, secular society. In response, the likes of Zinman, Abbado (thrice!!!) and Rattle serve up a sleek, energetic, eco-friendly Beethoven where there is no moral imperative in the slipstream to change one's life or cross the Alps with Bonaparte. Add Janssons to their ranks. This cycle is beautifully played (even if there is no extra torque at key junctures). Recording-wise, it is astounding. The fizzer of a Ninth aside, I enjoy it. It's nice and dramatic. Outside these parameters, it means nothing. Here today and gone thereafter with no resonance. It should be increasingly hard to listen to the Eroica as one ages and dies as a liegeman of suburbia. Here, depressingly, is another exception to the rule. Perhaps Happy Acres can play it over the public-address system to gee up the old buggers, aplay at bingo.

Consider this. Furtwangler's Beethoven 9th from 1942 is a conflagration of suns; the last two movements of Uncle Otto's Beethoven Fourth from 1958 are the `barbaric yamp' of legend; the Fifth from `Karajan in Moscow' is reparation for Barbarossa. Antediluvian though I be, I want a Beethoven who tells me to live big; fight hard; love hotly; hate heatedly and rejoice exceedingly. A decaffeinated, carbon-neutral, fat-free Beethoven is ear-candy and that's about it.

In closing, one has to make reference to the contemporary works that spice this cycle. Assuredly, I am not the man to appreciate them. Shakespeare might say that while Beethoven bestrides the world like a colossus (or at least he did in the days of yore), these lesser creations walk under his huge legs and peep about to find themselves graves of sorts.

Why waste what little time you have left on such trinkets and beads of glass? The Real awaits you!
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Top-notch Beethoven 23 Feb 2014
By Bruce A. Mcdonald - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
No matter how often we've heard the Beethoven symphonies, good performances can continue to catch our attention--and this is a fine one. Jansons is always a fine conductor, and his Bavarian Radio Orchestra, caught in superb live performances in Munich and Tokyo, are in splendid shape. The EROICA is especially fine, I think, and is #7, and the balance for the choir in #9 is just right; the repeated high A's in the soprano part do not set one's teeth on edge, which can often be the unfortunate case. This must be the finest complete set of the Beethoven symphonies available on digital.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
My current favorite set of Beethoven symphones 5 April 2014
By IanO - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I love Beethoven symphonies...have done for a very long time. I love Klemperer (particularly Sym 3), Rattle (his underrated set in my opinion), Kleiber for his famous 5th and 7th), Wyn Morris (lesser known British conductor of previous generation), and to be honest lots of others. This set I have also enjoyed a great deal, not played every symphony yet, but I generally like the speed, the treatment of drums and brass in the overall mix, and also like that there are additional pieces, based on Beethoven, but in very different styles...that variety suits me a lot. Recording quality is excellent, live recordings help the atmosphere and electricity of the performances. I have not listened to them enough to be able to make a bigger claim such as 'my favorite ever' - but if you enjoy listening to these symphonies, this will not interrupt that enjoyment!
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Cautious interpretations, but the beautiful playing and appealing modern-music fillers tip the scales 30 Sep 2013
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Now here's a fascinating pairing, matching Beethoven's symphonies with five contemporary compositions that are inspired by or comment upon them. Jansons has picked two composers who are known to me - Shchedrin and Kancheli - while the rest of strangers except by name. Here are their matching compositions.
Mochizuki: Intermezzo Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2 & 6 "Nirai"
Shchedrin: Beethoven's Heiligenstadt Testament
Serksnyte: Fires
Kancheli: Dixi (for chorus and orchestra)
Widmann: Concert Overture for Orchestra, "Con Brio"

Before commenting on how well the pairings work, let me say that Jansons delivers middle-of-the-road readings of the Beethoven symphonies, but with such assurance and in such beautiful sound (as we've come to expect from Bavarian Radio) that nothing feels dusty or stuffy. Tempos are fairly alert but nowhere near the present fad for Beethoven's often alarmingly fast metronome markings. We are back in the days of Schmidt-Isserstedt and Eugen Jochum, when subscription audiences expected Beethoven to be comfort food. This must be the prevailing mood in Munich, since the same Bavarian Radio SO under Lorin Maazel delivered a Schubert and Bruckner symphony cycle that follows the same aesthetic conformity.

It's worth noting that Jansons' cycle contains a different Ninth Sym. from the one released as a single disc. Here the vocal quartet is Christiane Karg, Mihoko Fujimura, Michael Schade, and Michael Volle. For anyone whose ideal Beethoven conductors are Furtwangler, Klemperer, or Karajan, the heroic symphonies in this set (no. 3, 5, 7, and 9) will seem too domesticated, but the current generation of listeners may be conditioned by Rattle, Abbado, and Haitink, all of them tame Beethoven conductors compared to the rugged traditionalists.

As for the contemporary works, in the post-Schoenberg, post-modern, post-atonal world, it appears that each composer is free to invent their own sound world, and if that world is convincing, the piece is a success. Since my copy of this set is a download, I lack program notes to inform me about these contemporary works. (I don't even know what most of the titles mean.) But Kancheli's bold contrasts and Shchedrin's accomplished conservative idiom should appeal to anyone, while the other compositions often trade in on delicate orchestral textures that offer a marked contrast to Beethoven. the most ambitious and impressive is probably Kancheli's Dixi with its mysterious choral part and striking swing between the etherreal/religious and stak cries from the soul. I cannot claim in musical terms, however, to hear any derivations form the Beethoven symphonies - no doubt the program notes enlighten us about that. (Not many of us can approach contemporary art without a crib sheet.)

Which of Jansons' performances are the most successful? Because the playing is so mellow and the conducting so relaxed, it would have to be the even-numbered symphonies and Sym. #1, the last because Jansons is notably good in Haydn. the only performance that feels completely a miss is the tepid Ninth, which is almost radical in its lack of boldness. If I had to be totally consistent, it isn't fair to praise Jansons' conventional Beethoven when I panned almost literally the same performances from Thielemann and the Vienna Phil. Let's just say that the striking and enjoyable modern-music fillers tipped the scales.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback