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Beethoven: String Quartets Vol.3 (3 CDs)
 
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Beethoven: String Quartets Vol.3 (3 CDs)

17 Jan 2005 | Format: MP3

£15.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:44
30
2
14:28
30
3
7:34
30
4
6:24
30
5
7:59
30
6
2:56
30
7
0:42
30
8
13:27
30
9
5:02
30
10
2:17
30
11
6:29
Disc 2
30
1
8:52
30
2
8:31
30
3
17:10
30
4
2:03
30
5
6:02
30
6
6:13
30
7
3:16
30
8
7:49
30
9
7:19
Disc 3
30
1
4:23
30
2
6:59
30
3
4:12
30
4
4:54
30
5
13:53
30
6
1:54
30
7
6:26
30
8
3:08
30
9
8:17
30
10
14:28
30
11
9:19


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 9 May 2007
  • Release Date: 9 May 2007
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Label: Decca Music Group Ltd.
  • Copyright: (C) 2004 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 3:39:10
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001RGUXP8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 38,817 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Graham Phillips on 24 May 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is probably the best of the relatively recent recent recordings of the late quartets. The playing is sensitive, expressive and robust, and the sound quality is crystal clear. However, I have a couple of reservations. Personally, I find the excessive vibrato distracting (and I don't suppose Beethoven would have approved either). A little vibrato is fine for occasional emphasis, but this is too much, too often. (On the other hand, many other performances are as bad if not worse.) The other problem is the recording: there is a harshness to the sound that I find tiring. I'm sure this will vary with the equipment it is played on, but on my system it sounds "digital". Some people seem to like this.

The Beethoven late quartets are wonderful music that will repay much repeated listening over many years, so there is no harm in having more than one recording. There's no obvious "best" set. Personally, I have enjoyed the Italian Quartet, now beautifully remastered by Philips (perhaps a bit too warm and lyrical), and also the Alban Berg Quartet's second set (live in Vienna, with virtually no coughing!). The ones to avoid are the Juilliard (a quirky performance in front of a live audience who keep dropping things) and the Lindsays (loved by the critics, but ruined for me by the continuous heavy breathing and sniffing, and again too much vibrato).
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jon Chambers VINE VOICE on 11 Jan 2009
Format: Audio CD
The musical equivalent of Rembrandt's mature series of self-portraits, Beethoven's late quartets are multi-faceted, soul-searching, enriching and unsurpassed. Taken together they, like the paintings, seem to comment on the human condition like few others. No collection should be without them.

I agree with an earlier reviewer that there's too much vibrato here. Edward Dusinberre seems especially guilty of this excess. But I would still value these recordings on the grounds that first, they offer many qualities that compensate. The playing of Takács is very often subtle and thoughtful. To take just one example, Dusinberre's phrasing in Op130.iv and the variety of effects he produces in this same danza tedesca are considerable and you understand why a Gramophone reviewer said that it seems as though there's no other way the music should go. Second, of course, the music itself is absolutely sublime. If, like mine, your ideal recording of these peerless works would feature minimum-vibrato, you're likely to have to wait a very long time - too long for music of such beauty and monumental importance.

Interestingly, Takács perform Opus 130 with its original finale, Große Fuge (now designated as Op 133), followed by the alternative urged by his publisher - shorter, lighter and slighter. Also included in the set is the Opus 95 Quartet in f.

These last works by Beethoven are highly individual, bordering on the eccentric and veering from pathos and troubled introspection to throw-away flippancy and whimsy in an instant. Takács are at least able to suggest these qualities as well as their transcendent greatness.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By MR M S GRAHAM on 13 Jan 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is a fantastic set. The Takacs Quartet play with absolute conviction and terrific passion. This set was singled out for special mention on BBC's Radio 3, CD Review, round-up of the best records of 2005.
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