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Beethoven: String Quartet, Op. 127 (transcribed for string orchestra); Piano Sonata, Op. 101
 
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Beethoven: String Quartet, Op. 127 (transcribed for string orchestra); Piano Sonata, Op. 101

16 Nov 2004 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:38
30
2
15:27
30
3
8:08
30
4
6:50
30
5
3:57
30
6
5:57
30
7
2:47
30
8
7:13


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 25 Oct 2004
  • Release Date: 25 Oct 2004
  • Label: Sony Classical
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 56:57
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001GSEFPQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 532,582 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The piano sonata Op.101 is Perahia showing why he's so well regarded. The string orchestra version of the Op.127 quartet is interesting but I don't get any sense of Perahia having any vision as a conductor. There's nothing wrong with it but I'd just rather listen to the quartet in its original form, and if I want to listen to a string orchestra the serenades by Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, Elgar, and the Holberg Suite are all a more enjoyable listen.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sceptic a la M. Teste on 8 Feb 2007
Format: Audio CD
Murray Perahia conducts Opus 127 with a string orchestra. There is a tradition of this sort of arrangement going back to Mahler who arranged Opus 95 and, if I'm not mistaken, Opus 131. Toscanini used to like to do the Lento Assai from Opus 135 as a separate piece and Bernstien has recorded Opus 131 and 135 on a single disc with the Vienna Philharmonic strings. [With the rather touching dedication of the recording to his wife.]

Of course there are two anamolies here, firstly a pianist as a conductor and then string quartets as string symphonies.

With regard to the music......it will never replace the string quartet, on the other hand, it does not have to be a replacement it is simply another way of getting to know this piece. As a string symphony I feel some of the intimacy is lost and - bizarrely - sometimes the parts are less clear, I would have though clarity of part playing was a reason for massed strings to relieve the pressure on the solitary string player. On the other hand, it is a fascinating lecture in musical history. There are places which sound like late romantic music, for example, the coda to the first movement reminds a bit of Richard Strauss, I am also reminded of Strauss in the first variation of the second movement. Both passages have a huge distance between cello and first violin together with very intricate harmony with chromatic touches. The scherzo is predictive of Bartok. And so forth....

So it is worth a listen just for the historical angle.

Regarding the conducting, Perahia does this as one would expect, with great concern for the shaping of individual lines and their blending together of which he is an extraordinary master when playing the piano. I think he does well and I hope he will do more work as a conductor.
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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Jan 2005
Format: Audio CD
Murray Perahia has again produced a beautiful record. Strong, direct and sensitive conducting and as usual, a true poet at the piano.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great Sounding and Performance! 3 Oct 2013
By qing qiao - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Academy of St. Martin in the Fields is one of the top line orchestra. They performed the Beethoven String Quartet as a chamber orchestra, you will feel so fresh, totally different as a quartet, huge sounding, wonderful, colorful and beautiful. They have done a great job. Of course Mr. Perahia's piano is great as always!
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
An eccentric transcription and an Op. 101 that sometimes fires, sometimes misfires 16 Nov 2008
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Murray Perahia has been a traditionalist all his life and as such has recorded a good deal of Beethoven, but his forays into the sonatas have been intermittent. He was apparently shy of approaching the late sonatas, and after this Op. 101 from 2004, no more followed. I think I can hear why. He's not temperamentally sympathetic to the unruly, jagged aspects of Beethoven's final imagination. To compensate, the pianist constantly rounds off the sharp curves and flattens the abrupt accents. This attempt to tame the sonata is misguided to begin with, I'm afraid.

The main failing is in the first movement, with its many odd gear changes. The quick-march second movement and brief Adagio go well enough, although the latter fails to sound mysterious despite Perahia's accomplished touch. Perahia seems happiest in the finale, where his ability to clarify the left and right hand is remarkable. The music comes alive with wit and sparkle -- not the only way to approach this music, but entertaining in its brio.

As for the string orchestra transcription of the Op. 127 quartet, Perahia turns out to be an appealing conductor, and the ASMF play with obvious affection. Is this a successful version? Well, the first movement turns out to be a refreshing srenade for strings in its new guise, and the slow movement holds it own. But the last two movements were tailored to the sound and teture of a string quartet, too much so for massed strings to sound right.
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