Beethoven - Piano works, ... has been added to your Basket

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£5.73
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon
Add to Basket
£5.99
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.00. Details
Sold by: Naxos Direct UK
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Beethoven - Piano works, Vol 5
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Beethoven - Piano works, Vol 5 CD


Price: £5.70 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by Truck Music Store and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
22 new from £4.42 5 used from £3.99
£5.70 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Truck Music Store and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon's Ludwig van Beethoven Store

Music

Image of album by Ludwig van Beethoven

Photos

Image of Ludwig van Beethoven
Visit Amazon's Ludwig van Beethoven Store
for 534 albums, photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Beethoven - Piano works, Vol 5 + Beethoven: Piano Works Vol. 3 [Recorded 1932-1935] + Beethoven: Piano Works, Vol. 7
Price For All Three: £17.68

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
  • Audio CD (29 Sept. 2003)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Naxos Historical
  • ASIN: B0000CDJJ5
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 240,412 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Adagio Sostenuto
2. Allegretto
3. Presto Agitato
4. Allegro
5. Andante - Allegretto Tranquillo - Andante
6. Scherzo. Allegro Molto - Trio
7. Rondo
8. Allegro Vivace
9. Adagio Grazioso
10. Rondo - Allegretto

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J Scott Morrison HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 10 Dec. 2003
Format: Audio CD
When His Master's Voice made plans to have Schnabel record all of Beethoven's piano sonatas in the 1930s it was a huge financial risk. They ameliorated that risk by signing up subscribers ahead of time.The project became one of the most notable recording efforts up to that time, and it was a success. When finished it came to over 200 78rpm sides and included many of the smaller pieces as well as the full 32 sonatas. The performances became legendary and remain so. Schnabel was and is so revered for his Beethoven playing that no one since has even come close. And for good reason.
This issue, number five in the series of CDs that will eventually number eleven, contains Beethoven's most popular sonata, the 'Moonlight,' No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 27, No. 2. This is the recording I grew up with. I remember my teacher sitting me down to listen to how Schnabel played the whirlwind third movement and commenting, 'You'll never be able to manage it that well.' That hurt. But, of course she was right. That last movement, in Schnabel's hands is simply titanic. It doesn't matter that there is some sonic distortion in the loudest passages; it's the playing that counts, and we're lucky to still have Schnabel's performance some seventy years later. As for the first two movements of the sonata, one can only marvel at the utter calmness of that famous first movement, and the insouciance of the Allegretto. This performance does not have an equal.
The other two sonatas are almost at that level. The 'Pastorale,' No. 15 in D, Op. 28, manages somehow to combine broad tempi with peasant-like joie de vivre. The 'Pastorale' has never been one of my favorite sonatas, but Schnabel makes you believe in it.
The Opus 31 sonatas are among my favorites, but No.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Budge Burgess on 21 Sept. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Artur Schnabel (Austrian born, in 1882) has been described as a 'musician' rather than as a 'pianist'. There are technically better exponents of the instrument, there are pianists who are more disciplined and less explosive than Schnabel, but his interpretation of Beethoven's piano sonatas remains an outstanding contribution to music and to an understanding of the composer.
Schnabel had a composer's mind - he wasn't only a performer, he wrote and arranged as well. He also seems to have entered into Beethoven's mindset and established an almost telepathic link with the genius. Contemporaries of Schnabel certainly felt that no one in their era came as close to expressing the 'real' Beethoven.
And there is a significant parallel in Schnabel's recording of the work and Beethoven's writing of them. The piano sonatas were first and foremost Beethoven. They were written by him at a piano, and were played by him at a piano - not by an orchestra or quartet or trio. This is a direct link to Beethoven's hand, ear, and mind. The sonatas are passionately individual and intimate.
And they were written at a time when the piano was evolving - Beethoven was pushing the instrument to its then technical limitations. Schnabel records the works in the face of rapid developments of the technology of his time. Though recording techniques and equipment look at least quaint and antiquated by today's standards, this was the cutting edge of technology in the 1930's. Yet Schnabel was reluctant to record the works initially - he couldn't quite accept that it was legitimate.
And he had good reason.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
The Gold Standard 10 Dec. 2003
By J Scott Morrison - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
When His Master's Voice (England) made plans to have Schnabel record all of Beethoven's piano sonatas in the 1930s it was a huge financial risk. They ameliorated that risk by signing up subscribers ahead of time.The project became one of the most notable recording efforts up to that time, and it was a success. When finished it came to over 200 78rpm sides and included many of the smaller pieces as well as the full 32 sonatas. The performances became legendary and remain so. Schnabel was and is so revered for his Beethoven playing that no one since has even come close. And for good reason.
This issue, number five in the series of CDs that will eventually number eleven, contains Beethoven's most popular sonata, the 'Moonlight,' No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 27, No. 2. This is the recording I grew up with. I remember my teacher sitting me down to listen to how Schnabel played the whirlwind third movement and commenting, 'You'll never be able to manage it that well.' That hurt. But, of course she was right. That last movement, in Schnabel's hands is simply titanic. It doesn't matter that there is some sonic distortion in the loudest passages; it's the playing that counts, and we're lucky to still have Schnabel's performance some seventy years later. As for the first two movements of the sonata, one can only marvel at the utter calmness of that famous first movement, and the insouciance of the Allegretto. This performance does not have an equal.
The other two sonatas are almost at that level. The 'Pastorale,' No. 15 in D, Op. 28, manages somehow to combine broad tempi with peasant-like joie de vivre. The 'Pastorale' has never been one of my favorite sonatas, but Schnabel makes you believe in it.
The Opus 31 sonatas are among my favorites, but No. 1, the sonata included here, tends to be considered the weak sister of the set. Not here. Some music-lovers insist that Beethoven be dramatic, urgent, extreme. In this sonata, rather, we get chuckling, musing, high spirits. The third movement is positively Haydnesque in its humor. Schnabel brings it all off with pearly runs and impulsive dynamic surprises.
These transfers from the original 78s are probably the best to be had. Unfortunately there are still a number of distorted passages at high volumes and that can't be helped; it is a combination of the recording techniques of the time and the unavailability of pristine 78s from which to take these transfers. And, particularly in the third movement of the 'Moonlight,' Schnabel makes such huge dynamic contrasts that it was simply impossible at the time to record them without some sonic blasting. I'm convinced that transfer engineer, Mark Obert-Thorn, has made the best case for these recordings; they won't ever be done better.
Obviously these should not be one's only recordings of these sonatas. They are historical documents. I wouldn't want to be without modern recordings, but I certainly don't want to be without my Schnabels.
Self-recommending.
Scott Morrison
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Sound is much better on Pearl series 18 Dec. 2005
By A techno geek - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
With the high praise given in other reviews about the sound of these reissues, I ordered the set with great expectations. I regret to report that the sound is badly dulled by the engineer's filtering. While not as dull as the original LP or EMI CD releases, if you compare it to the Pearl releases of the mid 1990s, you will see what is lost. The Pearl series sounds unfiltered --- it has the greatest surface noise, but for the first time you can actually hear the sparkle and vibrancy of Schnabel's piano --- almost like a modern recording with a lot of noise. That sparkle gives the music a psychoacoustic aliveness that is profoundly important to the emotional impact. The engineering of the Naxos series puts the musician behind a veil of 70 years. The Pearl series brings Schanbel into your room now. The mind can filter out the surface noise and hear the vibrancy present. Perhaps someday computers will be able to do this for us. But this is not to be found in this Naxos series. As to the performances --- I can focus on the sound, because the performances are simply essential to any lover of Beethoven; when I sit down and close my eyes and listen, Schnabel more than any interpreter evokes a stream of images, moments, characters, feelings, and indescribable stories that inhabit Beethoven's musical world. But use Amazon's advanced search to find the Pearl editions of these recordings.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback