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Beethoven, L. Van: Symphonies Nos. 1-9
 
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Beethoven, L. Van: Symphonies Nos. 1-9

1 Oct. 2009 | Format: MP3

£30.99 (VAT included if applicable)
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
8:42
30
2
7:54
30
3
3:37
30
4
5:58
30
5
11:36
30
6
12:03
30
7
5:15
30
8
3:38
30
9
9:34
Disc 2
30
1
12:30
30
2
10:40
30
3
3:48
30
4
6:41
30
5
14:06
30
6
8:46
30
7
9:58
30
8
9:16
Disc 3
30
1
17:07
30
2
15:13
30
3
5:58
30
4
12:01
30
5
9:11
30
6
4:08
30
7
4:49
30
8
7:48
Disc 4
30
1
11:26
30
2
9:35
30
3
5:59
30
4
6:56
30
5
7:38
30
6
9:36
30
7
4:45
30
8
11:04
Disc 5
30
1
14:52
30
2
13:39
30
3
14:12
30
4
23:01
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 27 Oct. 2009
  • Release Date: 1 Oct. 2009
  • Number of Discs: 5
  • Label: BIS
  • Copyright: (C) 2009 BIS
  • Total Length: 5:53:00
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00478ZTA2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 155,763 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Rasmus Oerndrup on 28 Oct. 2009
Format: Audio CD
In this review I will try to compare various complete recordings of Beethoven's nine symphonies plus Carlos Kleiber's CD with Symphonies number 5 and 7 (on DG). Concerning Carlos Kleiber it is easily done: I will advice anybody who appreciates Beethoven (or who think they might appreciate Beethoven) to buy his CD. I doubt you can find better versions of those two works. When I mention Karajan in this review I refer only to his first complete set of Beethoven's symphonies for DG from 1963 with the Berliner Philharmoniker. The other complete sets I will write about are: Osmo Vanska and the Minnesota Orchestra (Bis), Jos van Immerseel and Anima Eterna (Zig Zag), David Zinman and Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich (Arte Nova), Herbert Blomstedt and Staatskapelle Dresden (Brilliant). All orchestras mentioned here perform on modern instruments except Immerseel's Anima Eterna.

I will go through the symphonies one by one and give short comments on the various recordings. I will start in reverse order since I guess most people will be interested in the late symphonies primarily.

Karajan plays a terrific and grand 9th ("Choral") - his wild gestures and colourful style fit the work well - he is a true romantic in the first romantic symphony in musical history. It is the only 9th I have heard in which all the movements really shine, for instance in Vanska's recording only the two last movements really work for me, but then again those two are amazing - you can hear every polyphonic detail in the choral finale. Immerseel gives us a good "slim" 9th (only 33 musicians in the orchestra which though is 9 more than in the other symphonies). Zinman's recording lacks verve and excitement in the two first movements, but his adagio is pretty and the finale is gripping.
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27 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Krzysztof Makosa on 31 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
When faced with suspicious-looking "complementary feeding stuff for use in cats" or pet medication camouflaged with chunks of mouth-watering food, my cat gives it a searching stare and a long sniff; and finally, after pawing the floor in a sign of disgust, he proudly struts away. That is what I also do (well, more or less) when it comes to all manner of blurbs, puffs or other marketing gimmicks.

This time, though, I thought I couldn't ignore so much extravagant praise coming from so many respectable quarters. To cite only three examples: the venerable "Gramophone" gushed: "Here concludes one of the finest available Beethoven symphony cycles [...] a Beethoven reforged for today's world"; the informative "American Record Guide" enthused: "It's hard to think of a more distinguished Beethoven cycle by an American orchestra since the legendary Toscanini traversal of 1939 [...] a magnificent traversal that seems very much of and for our own time"; and the trend-setting "New York Times" opined: "[... ] it may be the definitive one of our time. Here is the first disc documenting the exciting work Mr. Vänskä is doing in Minnesota: the hook is less the latest surround technology than the exciting, involved playing."

Now I know I bought all the praise (and the Vänskä set along with it) without seeing the rationale behind it. And when I was listening to these taut, fleet-footed, well-engineered and unrelievedly bland readings, it suddenly dawned on me that the reviewers were right: this is, undeniably, a set of Beethoven symphonies that is "very much of and for our own time" or, better still, "for today's world"; and, as such, it may very well be the definitive recording of these magnificent works for the first half of the 21st century.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Autonomeus on 11 Aug. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Osmo Vanska leads the Minnesota Orchestra in a superb, sleek, HIPster Beethoven cycle, a great example of what can be done with the latest trend in Beethoven interpretation.

Is this "the best Beethoven cycle ever"? No, don't throw out your Furtwangler, or your other great traditional cycles. This is something different. There are those who have only one standard, and view this as "Beethoven lite" compared to those great old-school performances. It is indeed light as opposed to heavy, fleet as opposed to grand, Classical as opposed to Romantic, post-heroic as opposed to heroic. (Some like to think that "historically informed performance" means recreating the early 19th century, but in reality it is a new style, a product of its late 20th/early 21st century times.)

As many others have noted, the conductor and orchestra are magnificent, precise, and fantastically well recorded. I think the 9th in particular is one of the all-time greats, with an invigoratingly fast second movement and a spectacular final vocal movement. Beyond that, the entire cycle is compelling, with a common vision and sound throughout. Vanska does not deploy period instruments, but does use some period techniques such as minimizing vibrato. Unfortunately the liner notes are only about Beethoven and tell the listener nothing about the particulars of Vanska and Minnesota's performances.

I would recommend Vanska and
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