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Beethoven, L. Van: Piano Works (Complete), Vol. 7 - Sonatas Nos. 26, 27, 29
 
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Beethoven, L. Van: Piano Works (Complete), Vol. 7 - Sonatas Nos. 26, 27, 29

1 Oct. 2009 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £15.01 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 25 Aug. 2009
  • Release Date: 1 Oct. 2009
  • Label: BIS
  • Copyright: (C) 2009 BIS
  • Total Length: 1:09:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002QM2UH6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 160,164 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

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Format: Audio CD
I have several recordings of this piece, all vaguely unsatisfactory.
This recording has a musicality to treasure and sounds fabulous in surround sound - as if sitting in the room.
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As well as recordings on modern pianos, I already had fortepiano versions of the Hammerklavier and Op.90, but got this after being delighted with Brautigam's recording of the other four late sonatas.

The opening movement is marginally slower than Badura-Skoda's, thus avoiding the jerkiness that can arise when trying to follow Beethoven's metronome markings. Everything is clearly articulated and beautifully recorded throughout.

Writing about the slow movement of Op.81a, Tovey marvelled at the way Beethoven "admirably solves the problem of expressing the sorrow of absence without inflicting its tedium on the listener." Brautigam carries this off superbly, and moves into the delight of the Return in a way that captures the spirit of the work completely.

The big test in Op.90 is the lyrical second movement, which is here played with tenderness, mastery and clarity.

Sound is clear throughout, and Paul McNulty's reproduction of a Graf piano is perfect for music written for such Viennese pianos, which were close to full maturity when Beethoven composed these works.
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Format: Audio CD
While I've never seen him in concert, I've closely followed the career of Hollander Ronald Brautigam (born 1954) since acquiring his outstanding recording of Mendelssohn's three piano concertos on BIS Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Piano Concertos. Since that time, he has gone on to record most of the solo piano music of Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven. This is installment No. 7 in his series of Beethoven piano sonatas, containing two name sonatas, No. 26 "Les Adieu" Op. 81a and No. 29 "Hammerklavier" Op. 106. Between them, Brautigam sandwiches the Sonata No. 27 in E minor, Op. 90.

I wasn't sure what to expect from this recording even though BBC Music Magazine gave it a rave in the October 2009 issue. I recall that review singled out the virtuosity Brautigam displayed in the finale of the Sonata No. 26 "Les Adieu" in the return section. I have a unique circumstance to relate when that time first arrived in my household.

When Brautigam made the uninterrupted transfer from the second movement "absence" section to the finale, with that long winding run up the keyboard to the introductory right hand figure, then to the majestic and viruosic music that follows, my 15-year-old brindle cat displayed untoward joy. She ran about the household as if overwhelmed by youthful verve, bearing to and fro before rampaging to the den and jumping atop the entertainment center, where she often sleeps.

Mind you, this is a 15-year-old cat, a cat overweight by any standard that spends most of her life lying on your lap, the back of the chair, or the bed, or eating. She was as turned on by Brautigam's virtuosity as anytime I've seen her in her adult life!
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2 Comments 8 of 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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