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Beethoven: Fidelio
 
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Beethoven: Fidelio

6 Feb 2007 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
6:43
2
4:25
3
0:21
4
4:03
5
0:42
6
4:33
7
0:35
8
2:51
9
1:46
10
6:14
11
2:12
12
0:50
13
3:11
14
0:27
15
4:44
16
7:52
17
0:30
18
7:58
19
7:28
20
4:25
Disc 2
1
3:49
2
7:35
3
5:42
4
1:04
5
6:41
6
0:30
7
5:19
8
0:05
9
2:48
10
6:56
11
3:41
12
4:34

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 6 Feb 2007
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: LSO Live
  • Copyright: (c) 2007 London Symphony Orchestra Ltd
  • Total Length: 2:00:34
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IPSRXS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 164,023 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By js763 on 7 April 2007
Format: Audio CD
(Before I start I should probably say that this is a HYBRID SACD which works on any CD player.)

A strong digital recording of Fidelio is long overdue. Since the release of the mighty Klemperer recording 45 years ago, nothing has really come close. On paper, this latest effort from Sir Colin Davis and the LSO, with a super cast of soloists, looks extremely promising, but do they pull it off in performance?

The first concern when we talk about an LSO recording is the recording quality itself. The Barbican acoustic is notoriously problematic, and despite changes to the hall, the LSO Live sounds often far from the "spectacular sound quality" advertised. Here however, to my great satisfaction, we have one of the highest quality recordings I have ever heard; the voices and orchestra are recorded in thrilling clarity and warmth. Sir Colin Davis' frequent grunts and hums are also picked up, as overstated so irritatingly in BBC Music Magazine's recent review. They are audible but not intrusive (comparisons with Glenn Gould are preposterous) and should not detract from the performance.

The orchestra itself often divides the critics. Though the LSO always seems to play with great accuracy, they are occasionally accused of a lack of involvement in their performances. In this case they are simply beyond criticism. They play absolutely magnificently, sounding completely involved at every turn with both faultless ensemble and a great depth of feeling (the D major climax in the duet "O namenlose Freude" carries quite extraordinary power). Special mention must go to the winds, in particular Emmanuel Abbuehl's divine oboe solos and the ethereal tone of principal flute Gareth Davies.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Blackwater on 29 Mar 2010
Format: Audio CD
I have classic Fidelio opera recordings but have never felt satisfied with the results - this is different.
The concert performance works well and especially in surround sound multichannel.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By T.J.Byford on 10 May 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have to confess from the outset that whilst a die-hard fan of Beethoven in all his other works, I have always found Fidelio a problematic work and difficult to listen to. Much has been written about his being uncomfortable with the human voice and a work on the grand scale of Fidelio seems to reinforce this. So why a review? Well, this is also disappointing from an audio perspective and had the recording and performance been more electrifying it may have helped me change my views on the work as a whole.

Unlike the operas of Puccini, Verdi, Wagner, Donizetti, et al, Fidelio is not a musically easy opera to listen to as pure music. It does not possess the tunefulness of the opera composers who were to follow Beethoven, and in a work that has narrative separating the musical tableaux, non-German speakers are at a distinct disadvantage, as in this recording. I sometimes wonder if Beethoven felt that he had to compose in this genre in view of the success that Mozart had with his far more approachable operatic style, even when narrative is included in the recording.

For home listening, narrative is not that important as the libretto can easily cover this with comment to inform the listener, and to repeatedly have to listen to the narrative on each subsequent playing can easily get in the way of the flow of the music.

By now, you have probably gathered that I do have problems with this work, and unfortunately the somewhat lacklustre recording doesn't help. I would have expected greater things from SA-CD technology, but this recording does seem very ordinary and barely above that which CD can offer. That this has much to do with the acoustic of the recording venue and the constriction of a live session is no doubt the issue.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
An impressive Fidelio that's the best in a long time 15 Feb 2007
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
By current standards, this is quite a successful Fidelio. British critics tend to assume that the latter-day Sir Colin Davis has steadily ascended to greatness, forgetting that he had a period of considerable dullness in Germany before returning to London. His earlier studio recording of Fidelio for RCA fell into that category, despite a magnificent Florestan from Ben Heppner. In this live performance from the Barbican with the London Sym., he's lucky to have two fine leads, beginning with Christine Brewer, a rising American dramatic soprano whose ample, gleaming voice seems more suited to Leonore than Deborah Voigt's in the earlier set (Voigt's voice lacks body in the lower range, where Leonore's music often lies). Brewer is full and expressive in her big "Absheulicher...Komm Hoffnung" aria, which is handled with solid voice and confident scale passages.

Almost as impressive is the Florestan of John Mac Master, big-voiced and dramatically fervent. He isn't the world-class singer that Heppner is, not to mention Jon Vickers, but Mac Master's tone suits the role far better than, say, Reiner Goldberg for Haitink. His tone wobbles under pressure but not seriously. When husband and wife are reunited for the duet, "O namenlose Freude," sparks fly, and one is convinced that a better coupling probably can't be found today. The minor roles are well filled, if not up to the standards of the two leads.

My reluctance to give five stars is owed to Davis, who falls into some mannered phrasing, and whose tempos can be slack here and there. He's foursquare and ordinary in the big choral passage when the prisoners are let out and later in the glorious finale, here rather underwhelming. Others may enjoy his non-heroic view of the opera more than I did. The LSO plays very well, if not with the utmost conviction, and the sonics are fine. What's most impressive is the musical accuracy of all concerned in a concert setting, and considering the rash of poor recordings we've gotten of Fidelio lately (Haitink, Rattle, Dohnanyi) this new Davis reading is welcome.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Not great. 13 Jun 2010
By R. Colton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Let me disclose up front that Fidelio is my favorite Opera. I have heard uncountable live performances and most of the recorded ones. Colin Davis is usually a great conductor. I have heard him live many times. The performance simply is not up to his usually outstanding standard. In all of the roles I have heard live and on recording more exciting singers. Too the sound should be better. This is a worthwhile recording but it could have been definitive for modern sound and is not. I have never heard a studio recording that can be unreservedly recommended. Although the sound is not too good the 1944 Boehm recording and 1950 Furtwangler, both live, have real excitement.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
best since vickers/klemperer, but... 22 Mar 2010
By J. Wayland Eheart - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Artistically, the Vickers/klemperer recording is my favorite of the "old" issues (I own both LP and CD), but the current one is my next favorite, and I only echo the opinion of the other reviewer. The sound is excellent for a live recording, making me wonder if it was recorded in concert version with the singers standing close to microphones. I have listened to it about 5 times since I received it, but just now for the first time am listening in partial multichannel (in addition to the two fronts, I have rear right and left, but no center or sub). I must say that this is the way to enjoy SACD. Some people find it flat on a regular stereo, but in multichannel it really comes alive. The clarity of SACD is evident in the loud passages, which all too often get distorted in regular CD.

So why only 4 stars? The Rudolph Serkin/Glenn Gould effect! True, neither had anything to do with this recording, but someone, probably either Colin Davis or a patron sitting near a microphone(another orchestra member wouldn't dare), is pulling a Serkin/Gould by humming along with the whole opera. It's distracting and disturbing, and really interferes with enjoyment of the opera, although it could be said to add to the realism, particularly in my town where only opera lovers go to the opera, and many like to hum along.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Beethoven - Fidelio (LSO Live) 24 Nov 2011
By Bjorn Viberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Beethoven - Fidelio (LSO Live) is a 2007 LSO recording starring Andrew Kennedy who leads the London Symphony Orchestra. The booklet contains music notes written by Stephen Johnson and synopsis. Andrew Stewart has also included a short profile. The lyrics are in German and English. Compared to say the 1953 Furtwängler the tempo is much quicker. This is a problem. It seems as if Kennedy wants to rush through the program. Also talent such as that of Rudolf Shock is sorely missing. Still not a bad recording. Good enough to get a solid 4. 4/5.
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