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The Beating of his Wings (Left Hand of God Trilogy 3) Hardcover – 15 Aug 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Michael Joseph (15 Aug. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 071815522X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0718155223
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 4.3 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (126 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 218,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

A cult classic . . . (Daily Express)

Tremendous momentum (Daily Telegraph)

This book gripped me from the first chapter and then dropped me days later, dazed and grinning to myself (Conn Iggulden)

About the Author

Paul Hoffman is the author of three previous novels, The Last Four Things (2011), The Left Hand of God (2010), The Golden Age of Censorship (2007), a black comedy based on his experiences as a film censor and The Wisdom of Crocodiles (2000), which predicted the collapse of the world financial system.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A. Hewitt on 18 Mar. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved the first book in this trilogy; whilst it had a lot of familiar tropes, it was well written, entertaining and hooked em with well realised characters and a fleshed out world.

By the end of this third book I was ready to visit some of Thomas Cale's wrath upon the author.

I can just about put up with the constant, "These Redeemers are the greatest soliders ever... but the Materazzi are unparalleled in combat... but the Laconics are the finest warriors of all time... no wait, the Redeemers are incredible... etc" way of melodramatically trying to inflate every battle. Ditto the tendency for every battle to leave one side of the verge of ruin, only for them to pull through despite terrible losses... and then that gives them a decisive advantage over everyone else in the world put together. Hmmm.

I can live with the author not just taking things for inspiration from history (which the series does very well) but then just copying them almost word for word. One speech is given as an introduction to a chapter (with correct attribution), and then used by a character just a few pages later. What on earth is that supposed to achieve? We know the concept you're trying to get across; trust your readers more!

I can even nearly get over the clumsy chaos theory analogy, which stems from (literally) the beating of a butterfly's wings. And the results seem terribly important at the time, but actually aren't at all. This happens a lot.

I can almost forgive the ridiculously self-contradictory nature of the writing throughout, such as (not verbatim) "And that was the final straw that meant he would never recover" ... and then a few pages later he's recovered. "And then Cale was killed" ...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dr. C. Forester on 13 May 2014
Format: Paperback
What a terrible disappointment. The first book in the trilogy was gripping, exciting, raising lots of questions, a real page turner. It created an interesting world and really made you want to see how things turned out. The second book was not quite as good but still took the story further and still left you wondering about how it would all turn out.

This book feels like the author is just taking the mickey out of his readers.

This is meant to be some kind of post apocalyptic fantasy drama based around a nightmare vision of a religious order - like the medieval catholic church inquisition style but worse. This book starts with the main character er.....having psychotherapy because for some reason he's gone mad. There is even some stupid psychotherapy report where the therapist says they don't believe main character's story.

Right at the beginning though the author attempts something I first saw in a wonderful episode of the sci fi series Babylon 5 called "the deconstruction of falling stars." In this episode the main characters are all analysed from millions of years in the future when they are just matters of distant historical record. This book attempts this. Suddenly we're arguing about an archaeologist who found the manuscript of the trilogy and whether it was all real or not. It just makes you wonder what the heck this author was trying to achieve. It's baffling and annoying.

And then the plot just peters out and the main character wanders off inconclusively.

This is the most lazy, arrogant, disappointing end to a trilogy in any genre I have ever read. So bad, I wish I hadn't started the trilogy in the first place and so terrible I will never buy a Paul Hoffman book again. Hoffman totally "phoned this in" and just plays with his readers--- it really does feel like he just couldn't be bothered. Neither will I with his work again.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Matt Fisher on 4 Oct. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ending is really anticlimatic , I read the first book in the trilogy and was very excited when the second came out and came away feeling a little dissapointed. The final piece did nothing to dispel this feeling.

The main issue is that the bulk of the plot relates to the war between the reedemers and cales forces and yet the descriptions of the battles are virtually non existant , towards the back end of the book the author literally lists about 10 or 12 battles which lead up to the final showdown on one page but doesnt give a scrap of detail about any of them !

I was hoping the ending would redeem the book but without spoiling it anticlimatic doesnt do it justice the ending is just terrible.

My personal opinion is that the author started with a really good premise and just lost his way a little bit i think that this series could have been excellent if it had been over say 5 books.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By grimsbyforever on 27 Sept. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Having read both previous books, and having experienced the same downward trend as other readers it was with trepidation that I bought this book. The plot development from the second book continues to fall away until by the end of the book it is non-existent. The character continues to fall in ability and interest. Other characters in the book are ignored or woefully under developed.
The story arc continues to fall apart until you get to the end of the book when the main character just walks away... and if anyone can explain what all the nonsense at the start of the book and at the end of it means? The author seems to have got carried away with his dreams of grandeur and had to rush onto a new book so didn't bother to finish this one.
Very disappointing because it had good characters and interesting arcs early on in the trilogyl.
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