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Beat the Drums Slowly (Napoleonic War 2) Hardcover – 11 Aug 2011

30 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: W&N; First Edition edition (11 Aug. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0297860380
  • ISBN-13: 978-0297860389
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.9 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 179,163 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

This tale of the world of the redcoats in peril is required reading for fans of the period (GOOD BOOK GUIDE)

Book Description

The second novel in a brilliant new Napoleonic series from acclaimed historian Adrian Goldsworthy.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By amazon customer on 15 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Once again Adrian Goldsworthy shows his versatility as a writer, BEAT THE DRUMS SLOWLY, the second in his Napoleonic series, depicts the harrowing retreat to Corunna in the depth of winter, with the feeling of one who was there. (indeed it takes me back to my many years with the Para Brigade and the cursed Black Mountains) The character development is really three dimensional, and the interaction between officers and men truly believable. As an amateur historian I cannot fault his in-depth research into the life of a British soldier during the Napoleonic wars (both officers and men) and the tactical movements of Battalions and Brigades. I am looking forward in anticipation to the next in the series. Keep up the good work Adrian.

The perfect gift for all history buffs is THE ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKERCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker
Here is an extract from Adrian Goldsworthy's review, in it he says:
Over each scene is a profile of Vespasian, much like a coin - the centurion and his chums have shields with the Capricorn on them based on the Arch at Arausio, and plausibly interpreted as belonging to Legio II Augusta, which of course Vespasian commanded in AD 43. The designers have done their research well and got things right. ALL IN ALL A VERY HANDSOME AND WELL MADE PIECE.
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44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By james eves on 21 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is my first time with Adrian Goldsworthy and I must say what a pleasure it has been . Anyone who steps into the world of Sharpe leaves himself open to comparison ,but it is a long time since Sharpe has taken to the field and it is about time we revisited the world of Napoleon and Wellington , although in this adventure we are with General Sir John Moore who has pushed deep into Spain and must retreat through the mountains to reach the port of Corunna and the ships that will carry them home. Ensign Hamish Williams has the makings to stand alongside Sharpe and Matthew Hervey and as they often found themselves separated from the regiment, so does our hero as he hunts for Jane MacAndrews, the daughter of his commanding officer who has got lost between the rear guard of Moore's retreating army and the advancing French. After rescuing Jane from the French cavalry he starts to make his way back to the regiment and on the way he picks up a rag-tag band of fellow stragglers who he must rally as he discovers that the French are trying to outflank the retreating British and the only thing standing in there way is Williams and his rag-tag band of stragglers. The research and the detail for the period that Adrian Goldsworthy brings to the page soon has you in the thick of the battle and I for one felt that I had walk every step of the way with Williams as he must decide whether his life and that of his rag-tag band are the price he must pay to save the army. I will now look forward to the next outing of Ensign Williams and the 106th as they take on the French ,with the same anticipation as I did when a new Sharpe appeared.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By S. Morris on 21 Jan. 2012
Format: Hardcover
There are only six reviews to date. The reason for adding this one is that I firmly believe this series of novels deserves more attention. This is far from simply a 'me too' novel, many of which frankly cannot hold a candle to well known authors such as Bernard Cornwell.

Book 1 was good; this was better. Perhaps I just prefer my heroes to be under-stated and far from perfect, but it's allied with decent measures of drama, history and sparkling dialogue. I hope that formula will win people over.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Peacock MA on 7 Sept. 2011
Format: Hardcover
I'm already hooked on this series, after just this, the second book. A fresh breeze is blowing through this genre, previously dominated by Richard Sharpe. I read the Sharpe books from the very first and have been waiting for a long time for the gap to be filled, here, at last is a series that I think will qualify. Loved the second book more than the first, great story telling and attention to military detail. Loved the story line with Hamish and Jane and it's more than time that Sir John Moore was given space in a historical novel. A super read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Simon Quinn on 25 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Beat the Drums Slowly is the second novel in Adrian Goldsworthy's series on the Peninsular War. It follows on from the events of his first novel, True Soldier Gentlemen. I found Goldsworthy's first novel a refreshingly good read, which provided a decent and authentic account of the hardship endured during the early phases of the Peninsular War. Beat the Drums Slowly shares many of the same qualities as its predecessor. The novel follows the men of the fictional 106th regiment of foot in Britain's army in the Peninsular, now led by General Sir John Moore. After pushing deep into Spain, the British find themselves hugely outnumbered by the French forces. In a desperate bid to escape the danger, the British retreat to Corunna, through the mountainous north of Spain in the midst of winter. The setting provides great drama, and the narrative zips along with commendable gusto. Goldsworthy wonderfully captures the fear among the ranks that arises from their situation. The sense of terror during the set piece battles is transmitted to the reader particularly well.

The development of Goldsworthy's characters however, sets this novel apart from the first. One of the few criticisms of True Soldier Gentlemen was that there were too many characters for a book of its size, thus no protagonist featured enough. In this instalment, Goldsworthy focuses the plot on Hamish Williams. Williams, who is frustratingly shy towards women, finds himself separated from the army as he hunts for the missing Jane MacAndrews, a woman he adores. As the events of the campaign unfold, Williams' mission to see Miss MacAndrews return safely to the army is sidetracked when he learns of a French plan to secretly outflank the British forces.
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