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Battleships: Axis and Neutral Battleships in World War II (Battleships) Hardcover – 1 Dec 1990


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 523 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press; Revised edition edition (1 Dec 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0870211013
  • ISBN-13: 978-0870211010
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 24.1 x 29.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,005,543 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By I.M. Terran on 19 Feb 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was looking forward to receiving this book as it was highly recommended from various different sources.

However just 3 pages into the introduction I came across this statement in reference to the final agreement reached by the five powers for Washington Naval Treaty of 1922:

"the British were allowed complete the battlecruiser Hood"

Now the Hood was fully complete and commissioned into the Royal Navy in May 1920 - a year and a half before the Washington Naval Conference even started.

Such a blatant error did not bode well for the rest of the book and indeed I noticed many other examples of incorrect information in the book which was disappointing as it made me distrust other information provided in the book that was outside my own particular knowledge.

Having said that, the book is an impressive piece of scholarship and well worth having, as long as it is remembered that the factual information contained within needs to be cross checked with other sources to confirm its accuracy - do not treat it as gospel.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 July 2001
Format: Hardcover
Although the classes of battleships described in this very satisfying volume are only seven, the vast amount of data, plans and fotos, as well as the very nicely written text, make this book a very useful addition to the library of any warship enthusiast.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Delivered like description - a good choice.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
FINAL VOLUME OF AN AWESOME HISTORIC TRILOGY 9 Aug 2006
By Heather L. Parisi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
FIRST THOUGHTS: THIS VOLUME WAS MY FAVORITE OF THE TRILOGY

I have read many books about this subject and this volume adds some fresh perspectives and details to what I have already come to understand. Although no book on the subject can be considered either perfect or all-inclusive this series and this specific volume in particular is comprehensive and organized in a very easy and useful format making it a 'must-have' for those with an intense interest in Battleships.

IN A NUTSHELL: CASE STUDIES OF 7 DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT CLASSES OF DREADNOUGHTS FROM 4 COUNTRIES

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER TWO: THE YAMATO CLASS
CHAPTER THREE: THE SCHARNHORST CLASS
CHAPTER FOUR: THE BISMARCK CLASS
CHAPTER FIVE: GERMANY THE "H" CLASS BATTLESHIPS
CHAPTER SIX: THE "O" CLASS BATTLECRUISERS
CHAPTER SEVEN: THE VITTORIO VENETO CLASS
CHAPTER EIGHT: SPAIN
CHAPTER NINE: CONCLUSION

APPENDIXES

A- STABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE BISMARCK CLASS
B- INBOARD PROFILE AND DECK PLANS OF THE BISMARCK
C- BATTLESHIP AND BATTLECRUISER GUNS

WHAT IT IS ALL ABOUT: THE ZENITH OF A NATIONS TECHNOLOGY & POWER

BOTTOM LINE: THE FINAL VOLUME OF AN AWESOME HISTORIC TRILOGY

After a complete reading of the entire trilogy, I feel, I now better understand the construction and design considerations that lead to a completed Dreadnought. These books and this volume in particular have fed my interest to look deeper into the topic of Dreadnought construction. After reading this series I feel better able to grasp the technical materials that I will have to deal with as I continue to delve into the fascinating topic of 'Dreadnoughts'.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Extremely valuable 14 Nov 2001
By Richard Worth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The G&D books cover a lot of territory. Each section begins with a short design history followed by an overview of the design, broken down into categories (armament, protection, propulsion plant, etc). When it comes to understanding a ship's armor scheme, there's no substitute for seeing a series of drawings; stats-in-a-vacuum like those in a Conway's are less than useless, and a token cross section gives only a glimpse. G&D provide a fully realized picture. The chapter on the Bismarck class is blemished by a lack of definitive information; only now is the extent of the 80mm weather deck generally becoming known, and G&D label it as 50mm throughout. In fact, plenty of questions remain on Bismarck and Tirpitz and their differences, so it's hard to fault G&D for this.
Another weakness is the reference to gun penetration data based on USN calculations; the formula for these calculations was actually intended to predict performance against homogenous armor, and its most common application has been for face-hardened armor. Thus they serve to be indicative only in the most general sense--in other words, why bother?
I find it easier to pick out the nits than to try to elaborate on the battery of qualities in the three books. They sit on the shelf within easy reach, and I refer to them regularly.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Garzke and Dulin - the Battleship twins 21 July 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The authors of this book complete their trilogy on capital ships of the World War II era with this book. They examine WWI development, the Washington Naval Conference and its effect on pre WWII designs, the escalator clause and wartime developments affecting the battleships and battlecruisers of Japan, Germany, Italy and Spain. Spain is included among the Axis powers due to Franco's right wing regime and aid received from Germany and Italy during the civil war. Step by step details of the design of Yamato and the inherent weakness of her underwater protection are discussed. The gunnery comparisons between Yamato and Iowa are surprising. The chase and sinking of Bismarck and Scharnhorst are detailed and the weaknesses in German designs are pointed out. Finally, the authors compare capital ships in four design areas: 1) battlecruisers 2} 35,000 ton designs 3) 45,000 ton designs 4) 45,000 plus ton designs. There are gunnery tables included at the end for comparison of contemporary naval artillery. This book, along with their books on Allied and US Battleships, belongs on the shelf of any wargamer or warship historian/enthusiast.
19 of 27 people found the following review helpful
How NOT To Do a History of Warship Design 15 Aug 2001
By Melvin J. Burmaster - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have had a long time interest as a historian and having had personal connections with the sea, I have built up a library for about 30 years which includes the significant texts on naval construction. I have all three of the Dulin/Garzke books, and of the three books the tome on Axis/Neutral ships is by far the best production. I suspect, though, that the tome on Axis/Neutral ships is better only because the authors have had to learn something about writing in their two prior attempts. The "strengths" of Dulin & Garzke are in assessing engineering, and in condensing text for a supposed "average adult" to follow the history of a ship. Unfortunately, Dulin & Garzke miss the point: the average reader with an interest in naval architecture is most likely to have technical experience with, or possesses graduate-school background, which calls for a greater depth of writing (and dedication to subject) by the author. For example, we get tantalizing hints of strategic considerations in discusing the German "Z" program, but the reader would walk away from the book not understanding that there was a Japanese "super battleship" concept in mind which produced the Yamatos. The discussions about armour and gunnery are acceptable, but again the reader with a greater interest in nautical history walks away unsatisfied. Tabular material is decently presented, and the faults of prior texts (such as an incomprehensible armour key) are avoided. On the other hand, the reader is given pictures which are all-too common in the literature; the most interesting presentations are on the B-65 class and the proposed Italian and Spanish designs. Here again, when one expects Dulin & Garzke to go "deeper" into the material, the trail ends abruptly. At least in this book Dulin & Garke avoid the farce of presenting the same picture 5 times (!) as in the treatment of the Montana class. I have considered this book "acceptable" but I hold forth that Dulin & Garzke would have brought forth a trio of superlative books if the authors had done more digging and possessed greater dedication to the material.
Awe-inspiring, though not comprehensive 30 Jan 2009
By M. Broderick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
After a very brief history of political influences on warship construction between the wars (mostly discussion of the disarmament treaties and the compliance or non-compliance of the affected navies) and another very brief discussion of warship design basics, we are given the meat of the book--Very detailed coverage of a few selected ship classes from each of the Axis navies. A brief operational history of each ship class is followed by exhaustive discussion of technical details. The authors assume great familiarity with naval terminology and technology by the reader, and don't slow down to cover anything that might be new to you. But the detailed critiques and comparisons are fascinating. Highly recommended for warship buffs who want to know it all about these particular ships. Note that it is not a "complete" guide to Axis battleships, and doesn't pretend to be one.

Nits include that the paper doesn't give best advantage to allow the reader to examine details of some of the excellent photos, and the size of the photos isn't all we could wish for in some cases where the original photo apparently contains a lot of detail--This is not a picture book, so perhaps judging it by those standards is unfair.

Other nits include that the book is now 25 years old, and in some cases new knowledge has come to light that would influence some of the conclusions here.

Final nit is that as mentioned, in some cases those who aren't professional marine architects, or at least extremely enthusiastic amateurs will be thumbing through reference books to uncover some of the terminology.

An essential book for those with a deep interest in these warships.
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