Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
The Battle Of Loos and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Battle of Loos (Wordsworth Military Library) Paperback – 16 Dec 1999

7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.96 £6.66

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.



Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wordsworth Editions Ltd; New edition edition (16 Dec. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1840222298
  • ISBN-13: 978-1840222296
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.6 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 188,048 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

The full story of the battle of Loos, an offensive presaging those of the Somme and Passchendaele, drawn from the memories and written accounts of veterans and survivors. --Chris Buckland --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Philip Warner (1914-2000) enlisted in the Royal Corps of Signals after graduating from St Catharine's, Cambridge in 1939. He fought in Malaya and spent 1,100 days 'as a guest of the Emperor' in Changi and on the Railway of Death, an experience he never discussed. He was a legendary figure to generations of cadets during his thirty years as a Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. Yet he will arguably be best remembered for his contribution of more than 2,000 obituaries of prominent army figures to The Daily Telegraph. In addition he wrote fifty-four books on all aspects of military history, ranging from castles and battlefields in Britain, to biographies of prominent military figures (such as Kitchener: The Man Behind the Legend; Field Marshall Earl Haig; Horrocks: The General who Led from the Front and Auchinleck: The Lonely Soldier) to major histories of the S.A.S., the Special Boat Services and the Royal Corps of Signals. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By the_bald_man on 26 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a curious book, one that offers so much, and sadly so nearly delivers but seems to fall short at the final hurdle. Phillip Warner is an excellent writer, as can be seen by his book on Passchendaele, however the account of Loos never really quite gets off the ground.
I was keen to read about a battle that cost so many lives yet has had so little written about it, and although interesting it lacks sufficient detail about the tactical reasons for the fighting. There is very little explanation of why this battle actually happened and what the troops aims were, and even less about its' impact on the rest of 1915.
Three quarters of the book is taken up with personal reflections by troops who fought at Loos, and these are quite superb, indeed, they are the redeeming feature of this book. I felt that a balance should have been struck between historical explanation and personal narrative and sadly this did not quite happen.
I would recommend reading about this little written about battle, but this is not a book that will stick in your memory for the right reasons.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 July 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a rare examination of the first 'Big Push', at Loos in September 1915. Whilst it includes a good collection of personal stories, it does little justice to the battle. The reasons why this action took place, the unfolding of events and the consequences of failure are barely covered. Worth reading as there is so little on this action, but hardly going to satisfy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chris Baker VINE VOICE on 20 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is another in a recent run of reprints of well-known works on the Great War, published by Pen & Sword. As a study of the battle it pales in comparison with at least two more recent works ("Most unfavourable ground" by Niall Cherry and "Loos 1915" by Nicholas Lloyd), and is not up to the high standard of academic rigour we have now come to expect from such works.

Warner's treatment relies heavily on personal accounts and letters by men who were there, and these are undoubtedly the strongest and most interesting aspect of the book. These include extracts from the diary of the Commander-in-Chief, Sir John French. Unusually, the personal accounts are not organised by timeline but into chapters, one for each British Division that was in action. This tends to make it difficult to follow the battle as it unfolds, and Warner's opening description of the conception and execution of the battle is at too high a level for the uninformed reader to position the individual that is speaking. Read in conjunction with, or possibly after, one of the two books named above, the accounts make much more sense and do add to our understanding. There is also a clear one-page sketch map.

I would not recommend rushing out to buy "The Battle of Loos" and certainly not for anyone wishing to study the battle for the first time, but the personal content is certainly of interest and worth buying for that alone.

"The Battle of Loos" was first published in 1976.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As with the book by Niall Cherry, this is a brilliant overview of a forgotten battle. The only thing wrong with it is the cover - which shows men wearing Brodie helmets (which they did not get until 1916). However, I think that's a publisher issue, and not an author. The book is great, and I relied on it heavily when researching my novel about the Battle of Loos.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback