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Batman: Prodigal Paperback – 12 Dec 1997

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Titan Books Ltd (12 Dec. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852868570
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852868574
  • Product Dimensions: 25.8 x 16.8 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 865,019 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

CHUCK DIXON

Born in Philadelphia, Pa.



Chuck Dixon has more than twenty-five years of experience in the graphic novel field as an editor, writer and publisher. He has contributed well over a thousand scripts to publishers like DC Comics, Marvel, Dark Horse, Hyperion and others featuring a range of characters from Batman to the Simpsons. His comic book adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit continues to be an international bestseller. Considered to be one of the most prolific writers in his field, this award-winning storyteller currently writes G.I. Joe for IDW, The Good the Bad and the Ugly and Stargate Universe for Dynamite, The Simpsons for Bongo Comics along with many creator-owned projects for various publishers.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. S. W. Steel VINE VOICE on 17 Oct. 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a fairly rare graphic novel, and can be quite hard to get your hands on. You tend to have to search for second hand copies of this collection. But is it worth the effort?
This story picks up after the Knightfall trilogy (probably one of the most defining series of comics in the history of Batman). Bane has been defeated,Azrael is missing, and Batman has returned to assume the mantle of the Batman. But, Bruce Wayne has decided to leave Gotham for a while and reassess his life. He previously left Gotham under the watchful eye of Azrael with disasterous consequences, and so this time he turns to someone he knows and trusts. His original sidekick Robin - Dick Grayson, aka Nightwing. Dick is also in a difficult time of his life and doesn't know quite where he fits in in the world. However, he takes up the role of Batman for Bruce.
The plot is well thought out and well executed. We see plenty of flashbacks into Dick and Bruce's previous exploits and witness Dick's biggest failure as Robin at the hands of Two-face. Tim (the current Robin) is more than happy to have his old friend as his partner and the two do a good job in protecting Gotham together. Their relationship is very well done. Dick is constantly questioning whether he is good enough to be the Batman, or whether he even WANTS to be Batman, whilst Tim is constantly reassuring him and backing him up. This is quite a role reversal for Robin, as usually he plays second fiddle to Batman! An interesting twist on a theme!
The plot moves at a nice pace, and this is quite a substantial graphic novel. There are plenty of nice action sequences to keep everyone happy, but it is the emotion that really keeps you gripped from the first to the last page.
The artwork is pretty good too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 17 Dec. 2000
Format: Paperback
Continueing on from previous graphic novels Knightfall Pt1 and 2 and Knightsend. Bruce Wayne, has just managed to overcome a broken back to get rid of the man, Azrael, who he chose to replace him as the Batman. Now Wayne decides again he must leave, and thus leave the safety of gotham city in the hands of a new batman, this time his first Robin, Dick Grayson.
This book deals with the "father and son" relationship between Dick, and Bruce, and Dicks feelings that he was in someway rejected when Bruce didnt ask him to take his place as Batman in the first place. The best features of this graphic novel is the further development of the relationship between Dick, Bruce, and the latest Robin, Tim Drake. Also the loss of faith in The Batman by Commisioner Gordon is an nice touch.
The actual individual stroies involving the bad guys Killer Croc, the ventriliquist, The Rat cathcher and Two Face, are not the greatest batman stories. Although the threat of Two face does allow Dick to overcome his previous trauma at the hands of two face in which Dick blames himself for another mans death, and thus prove himself, if only to himself.
While these stories will not automaticly put them over as classic batman tales, this collection of issues in the prodigial stroyline adds satisfactorily to the continueing Batman soap opera, and its greatest strength is the further development of the three characters Bruce, Tim, and especialy Dick Grayson.
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By Losinglemo on 22 Jun. 2015
Format: Paperback
Prodigal gives us a nice taste of what it would be like if Dick Grayson was to have the mantle of the bat (before he inherits it properly after Final Crisis). Set after the Knightfall Sage and with a newly returned Bruce once again setting off to do some soul searching (instead of spine searching) after his reclamation of the Bat mantle from Jean Paul Valley.This runs much like the normal Batman comics with Dick coming up against Ratcatcher, Scarface and Ventriloquist and Killer Croc in a villain of the week style. He also deals with the aftermath of Jean Paul in the form of the mutilated Tally Man still bearing his Scars from his encounter with Jean Paul Batman. We also get a nice heart warming father to son chat when Dick confronts Bruce as to why he wasn't given the mantle first instead of Jean. This story is also collected in a new edition printed alongside Knightfall: Knightsend for a more complete reading, but as I understand this book is fast becoming a coveted collectable. so get in when and where the goings good.
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By A Customer on 5 Dec. 1998
Format: Paperback
Way back in the late 30's, Bob Kane created a memorable comic character to aid his Dark Knight. This young man's name was Dick Grayson, also known as Robin. Flash forward to 1997. Two Robins later, Dick Grayson now becomes Batman. After the events of Knightfall, Knightquest, and Knightsend, Bruce Wayne officially passes on the mantle of the Bat to Dick Grayson. Grayson's evolution from the sidekick Robin to the lone avenger Nightwing to Batman is clearly defined here. The story tellers each keep true to the Batman history, but also give Batman a younger, fresher voice. Also, teaming up this new Batman with the newest Robin (Tim Drake) is classic. The two learn from each other. Finally, the conclusion of this book sums up over 60 years of Batman mythology between "a father and a son."
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By A Customer on 28 Mar. 1999
Format: Paperback
We all knew this day would come. Fresh off the Knightfall storylines, Bruce Wayne goes off to "find himself" and gives the cowl to his best Robin: Dick Grayson. A rather lackluster read considering what's going on, it's awesome in the fact that Dick's still around and he's driving "dad's" car. Taking on substantial bad guys and with Robin III in tow, Dick proves he's capable of the job. But Batman is only an identity and Dick's got his own already. Thankfully this novel puts an end to the Batman of dreary moodiness we've known since Robin II's death, and gives a little TLC to Dick and Bruce, which shows to this day. Not to say Batman's any less avengeful and driven, he's moreso once this one's over. A great read overall in the myths.
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