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Barry Lyndon Kindle Edition

4 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Length: 272 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

Thackeray's classic tale of Barry Lyndon, who escapes his life on the Emerald Isle to pursue a more luxurious existence in England, is reimagined in this audio edition, narrated by Jonathan Keeble. Reading in a rich, accented voice and making use of understated narration, Keeble immediately transports listeners back to the 18th century. His tone is firm and commanding, and he digs deep into Thackeray's prose to precisely capture the very essence of Lyndon. Keeble's narration is well paced, his timing impeccable. And while this audiobook weighs in at about 13 hours - a lengthy commitment for the casual listener - Keeble manages to keep his audience engaged for the duration. --Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

A dispossessed eighteenth-century Irish nobleman uses blackmail, bribery, and other underhanded devices to intimidate a wealthy widow into marrying him and relinquishing control of her wealth.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 788 KB
  • Print Length: 272 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1480253952
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004TQU4SE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #8,298 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Following in the footsteps of Fielding and Smollett, William Thackeray attempts to relate the tale of a lovable rogue, Redmond Barry, in the picaresque style. Narrated in the first person, distinctly unlovable Barry is the classic `unreliable narrator'. Born into insignificant Irish gentry the vain, narcissistic and self-deluding Barry is forced to flee from his native Ireland at the age of fifteen after apparently killing a man in a duel. First joining the British army and then pressed into the Prussian army during the Seven Years War he fights a few battles, deserts and then travels around Europe hobnobbing with the imbecilic European aristocracy and passing his time womanising, gambling and amassing a fortune. He finally returns to Ireland, cons and marries a rich widow and becomes Barry Lyndon. His downfall, when it comes, is not only inevitable but welcome because, rumbustious fun as the novel undoubtedly is, the incessant boasting and name-dropping eventually become somewhat tiresome.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an extremely entertaining and well written book in which the narrator's unreliability is skilfully and amusingly revealed as he recounts his adventures in eighteenth century Europe; the influences of which are clear in a number of later works. Thackeray himself re-employs many tropes in his later novels (the rise through society of a penniless chancer, the man-of-the-world uncle) that first turned up in the richly sardonic 'memoir' of Redmond Barry. And, more recently, the structure and tone of this novel must surely have been an influence on George MacDonald Fraser's Flashman series.

Look out also for an amusing and contemporarily relevant passage in which Thackeray denounces those who work in the City of London as 'gamesters'.
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By A Customer on 29 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
Like De Foe, Thackeray recorded the "autobiography" of his hero, Barry Lyndon, Irish adventurer, originally Barry Redmond, who became a chance soldier in the British and Prussian armies during the Seven Years War (1756-1763). After his adventures as a soldier and a spy, he becomes a professional gambler and faithful companion of the Chevalier de Balibari. Together they cheat the most famous courts of Europe with their "skill" at cards and build up a substantial fortune to add to their fame. The gambler gives up his days of adventure-seeking after conveniently "falling in love" with the Countess of Lyndon just after her extremely wealthy husband dies. His downfall comes soon after.
Highly recommended for the historical novel lover.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this story so well written and easy to read. However, I was so glad to finish it . Cannot deny that it is a fabulous description of the gentleman named in the title though. To be honest, I have never come across such an obnoxious ,revolting man ,who writes in the first person to boot. His character over the years from a complete nobody to an old man is without doubt truly unbelievable. Interesting from the point how marriage laws have thankfully changed since the 1700s. Must have been dreadful then if the lady in question had a substantial inheritance and had the misfortune to be married to such as this Barry. He is simply so audacious in his actions as to how he blithely disposes of her inheritance as well as his own fortunes just to be accepted into the high society. Thankfully in the end his wife is not so daft as he writes her off as and he himself gets his much deserved comeuppance. In a way, Thackeray writes with humour and I definitely recommend it as it is a masterpiece of how life in the very upper classes were in that century.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This satire of manners is narrated by the eponymous 'hero', though only he gives himself that epithet. Barry Lyndon is possibly the most unreliable narrator in English literature, and there is a great deal of entertainment to be had in contrasting his version of characters and events with the truth that peeps out through the pages. It is good fun to be shown aspects of eighteenth century high society with all its hypocrisy and foibles in the company of a (largely) lovable scoundrel, though his relentless boasting does occasionally become tedious. I learned a lot about fashionable society and its dirty linen, laughed a lot at Lyndon's cock-eyed self-image (as delusive as Don Quixote's), and even felt a tinge of sadness at his demise, however deserved.

Reviewer David Williams blogs regularly as Writer in the North.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Thackeray thought so ill of Barry Lyndon that he advised his daughters not to read it. Though his first novel I found it most readable and even memorable, with failings in its last section. The true story on which Barry's marriage is based -- the Stoney-Bowes marriage, which I knew about, much outshone Thackeray's fictional adaptation..
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
So easy to read in this format I have had a 19th century copy for years which I could never get through but on Kindle it was a breeze. Such an entertaining novel, Barry Lyndon was a really villainous self justifying monster you had to keep reading to see if he got his comeuppance.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the most badly produced book I have ever bought. The print size and quality and the layout and production are appalling and make the book more or less unreadable. On no account should it be bought.
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