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Bambert's Book of Missing Stories Paperback – 11 Apr 2006

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Paperback, 11 Apr 2006
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Product details

  • Paperback: 124 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling Books; Reprint edition (11 April 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440420458
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440420453
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 0.8 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,433,929 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"The writing is superb, without a wasted word and tribute must be paid not only to the author but also to Anthea Bell who translated the book from the original German. The illustrations by Emma Chichester Clark have a much darker tone than those found in her own books but they set the scene beautifully. It's a book to read, to treasure and to return to time and time again." "--Bookbag" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Reinhardt Jung was born in Germany in 1949. He worked with an international children's organisation before becoming head of children's broadcasting in Stuttgart in 1992. He died in 1999. Anthea Bell has worked as a translator for many years, primarily from German and French. She has received a number of prizes and awards for her translation work. She lives in Cambridge. Emma Chichester Clark is one of the country's top children's books illustrators, and is a past winner of the Mother Goose award. She has been nominated for the Kate Greenaway medal (for I Love You, Blue Kangaroo!), and shortlisted for the Kurt Maschler award twice. She has also won the Premio Grizane Cavour, a prestigious literary award in Italy. She studied at the Chelsea School of Art and the Royal College, where she was taught by Quentin Blake. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Mar. 2002
Format: Paperback
What a perfectly beautiful story. I just loved it. Totally on its own, but in all the best traditions - life, death, spirituality, friendship, weakness vs. strength, it makes no concessions to the sort of cloying sentimentality which some poeple think children want! Lovely translation by Anthea Bell too. A truly special and delightful book and one which I will treasure forever - a classic tale for children and adults.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "anabelp" on 19 Feb. 2003
Format: Paperback
I absolutely loved this book. I devoured it in one sitting and some of the stories made me get goosebumps. The stories are beautiful of many levels and can be enjoyed by children and adults alike. Some stories are joyful, some are somber, and some are straight out bizarre but the whole idea of the stories which are tied together by the main character Bambert is simply exceptional. A great read which everyone should read and pass on to everyone they know!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By domjukes on 15 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
I found this book on Amazon whilst looking for more interesting stories to read at night for my 7 year old. Having read it, I can confidently say that he is too young for some of the content and themes in the book. Perhaps he will be ready in a few years time. As an adult I was not sure what to expect but it is deeply moving and worth reading if you can get past the fact it initially appears to be a book for children.
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By Mr M. on 20 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my six-year-old son because it was included in a Children's Top 100 Books review by the Daily Telegraph. It is the only children's book that, having started it, I felt dread about reading to my child. The story is a sad one. I will give a few details. Bambert is a solitary man with a physical deformation, who spends his time ensconced in his attic, inventing stories, since he has no real friends bar the shopkeeper who rents the ground floor from him. He decides to send these stories out attached to Chinese paper lanterns for them to find a setting. He asks the people who find them to send them back to him and, according to where they have been sent from, he then sets the story in that place. So far, so good. But some of the stories are quite dark. The limit for me came with the ninth story, "The Glass Rafts". In this story, armed soldiers, described as "Black Angels of Death", lead barefoot children with shaven heads to an open pit. The children have old people's faces and are dressed in convicts' pyjamas (there is an illustration of this). In the end, the children escape, with the aid of the river, on ice floes. But for me the idea of children being marched to their death is a little too traumatic for a child. I will now discuss the end. The final story is unwritten. Bambert has attached some blank sheets to the paper lantern. He then discovers that the envelope containing the sheets has caught on the roof of his house and not gone anywhere. In trying to retrieve the envelope, he slips to his death on the pavement below (he actually dies later in hospital). Suitable for children? The shopkeeper, feeling sorry for his friend, writes the final story himself, in which he imagines Bambert on the other side, meeting all the friends from his stories.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Z. Aslam on 17 April 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A great book, very short (maybe an hour or two to read) but worth it. Although it is labelled as a kids book I don't really see it. The storyline is simple and easy to follow, but there are a lot of different themes and the main character had more than enough depth to feel satisfying. Reminded me somewhat of Oscar Wilde's "Happy Prince And Other Stories". If you liked those you'll probably enjoy these too.
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