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Balancing Agility and Discipline: A Guide for the Perplexed
 
 

Balancing Agility and Discipline: A Guide for the Perplexed [Kindle Edition]

Barry Boehm , Richard Turner , Grady Booch , Alistair Cockburn , Arthur Pyster
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product Description

Agility and discipline: These apparently opposite attributes are, in fact, complementary values in software development. Plan-driven developers must also be agile; nimble developers must also be disciplined. The key to success is finding the right balance between the two, which will vary from project to project according to the circumstances and risks involved. Developers, pulled toward opposite ends by impassioned arguments, ultimately must learn how to give each value its due in their particular situations.

Balancing Agility and Discipline sweeps aside the rhetoric, drills down to the operational core concepts, and presents a constructive approach to defining a balanced software development strategy. The authors expose the bureaucracy and stagnation that mark discipline without agility, and liken agility without discipline to unbridled and fruitless enthusiasm. Using a day in the life of two development teams and ground-breaking case studies, they illustrate the differences and similarities between agile and plan-driven methods, and show that the best development strategies have ways to combine both attributes. Their analysis is both objective and grounded, leading finally to clear and practical guidance for all software professionals--showing how to locate the sweet spot on the agility-discipline continuum for any given project.

From the Back Cover

"Being a certified bibliophile and a professional geek, I have more shelf space devoted to books on software methods than any reasonable human should possess. Balancing Agility and Discipline has a prominent place in that section of my library, because it has helped me sort through the noise and smoke of the current method wars."--From the Foreword by Grady Booch"This is an outstanding book on an emotionally complicated topic. I applaud the authors for the care with which they have handled the subject."--From the Foreword by Alistair Cockburn"The authors have done a commendable job of identifying five critical factors--personnel, criticality, size, culture, and dynamism--for creating the right balance of flexibility and structure. Their thoughtful analysis will help developers who must sort through the agile-disciplined debate, giving them guidance to create the right mix for their projects."--From the Foreword by Arthur Pyster

Agility and discipline: These apparently opposite attributes are, in fact, complementary values in software development. Plan-driven developers must also be agile; nimble developers must also be disciplined. The key to success is finding the right balance between the two, which will vary from project to project according to the circumstances and risks involved. Developers, pulled toward opposite ends by impassioned arguments, ultimately must learn how to give each value its due in their particular situations.

Balancing Agility and Discipline sweeps aside the rhetoric, drills down to the operational core concepts, and presents a constructive approach to defining a balanced software development strategy. The authors expose the bureaucracy and stagnation that mark discipline without agility, and liken agility without discipline to unbridled and fruitless enthusiasm. Using a day in the life of two development teams and ground-breaking case studies, they illustrate the differences and similarities between agile and plan-driven methods, and show that the best development strategies have ways to combine both attributes. Their analysis is both objective and grounded, leading finally to clear and practical guidance for all software professionals--showing how to locate the sweet spot on the agility-discipline continuum for any given project.



0321186125B10212003


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3777 KB
  • Print Length: 304 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (11 Aug 2003)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003XDU8BC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #456,486 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
By A. J. Gauld VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a good comparison of the best practice of Agile versus "traditional" software engineering. It does however assume you have already read the books on both sides and understand the basic tenets of each approach. Don't buy this expecting it to cover the two methodologies it simply compares and gives guidance about where each method fits best. As such its an excellent guide for the bewildered project manager or team lead.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Balanced Book 30 April 2007
Format:Paperback
This book attempts to find the common ground between two differing software development methods: plan-driven and agile-driven. Plan-driven methods are based on strong engineering principles, with an emphasis on a well-defined and -documented process and, usually, a sequential "waterfall" approach of requirements, design, construction and deployment. Agile-driven methods are based on iterative delivery, with a focus on business-value to the customer rather than on the process of delivery itself. The authors seek to find the middle-ground between the two approaches and describe ways of defining which approach is suitable for which types of project.

After providing useful contrasts and similarities between agile- and plan-driven approaches, the authors summarise the following as key factors in the decision as to which approach to use in a particular project. These factors are:

- Size. Agile approaches discriminate towards small products and teams. Large products and teams will favour a plan-driven approach.
- Criticality - in the sense that failure of the system under design causes loss of life and/or large monetary loss. Projects of high criticality will favour a plan-driven approach.
- Personnel. Generally speaking, agile approaches require workers that are more highly skilled than plan-driven ones. The rationale is that in the latter, the development process is more highly proscribed and hence easier to learn.
- Dynamism. This factor relates to the stability of the project environment; where the business environment is highly dynamic and system requirements are rapidly changing, then agile-driven approach is favoured. In highly-stable environments, the additional overhead of putting in place the infrastructure to deal with rapid change may not be necessary.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Generally good, with a few weaknesses 24 Oct 2003
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
As a devil's advocate for both Agile and Plan-driven approaches this book is excellent, pulling together a lot of useful information and providing a good commentary on it. It is marred slightly by evaluating agile techniques such as YAGNI in isolation and thus giving them a poor write-up. These techniques were never intended to be used in isolation; that message seems to be missing. But don't let that put you off.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Hype Cutter 13 Feb 2009
Format:Paperback
Boehm and Turner cut through the hype and evangelical hysteria generated by the opposing camps of Agility versus Discipline.
For developers of large, critical and Software Intensive Systems-of-Systems (SISoS), ignore these gentlemen at your peril!
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Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reality Check. Nothing new but worth of saying out loud. 14 Oct 2003
By Lasse Koskela - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Balancing Agility and Discipline focuses on saying out loud what people in the trenches have been thinking all along. There's still no silver bullet -- we need a well balanced tool bag instead of a multipurpose hi-tech hammer.
The authors start the journey by describing the fundamental differences between traditional, plan-driven approaches and the latest agile methods. This is a great introduction and paves the way for the discussion to follow. However, occasionally the text uses the term "agile process" too loosely when really talking about the extreme characteristics of XP.
Next, Boehm and Turner set out to describe a typical day in the life of two teams; one agile and the other not so. However, these stories didn't quite reach the level of detail I was expecting.
The authors continue by presenting two case studies of projects where a plan-driven method was streamlined using agile techniques and an agile method was scaled up with some plan-driven elements. The subject is of great interest and the authors' approach is definitely valid.
A decision tool for customizing an appropriate mix of agile and plan-driven ingredients is explained. The tool itself is largely based on Boehm's earlier work and focuses on risk management. The authors illustrate the mechanics of the tool by presenting a family of applications of varying levels of stability and complexity. The rationale behind the thought process for composing the optimal method is valid and built on well-known truths.
The last third of the book is populated by numerous appendices. The first appendix introduces some popular agile and plan-driven processes and maturity models in the form of two-page summaries and comparison tables. The summaries serve as useful reminders but nothing more. The rest of the appendices, however, provide a short but valuable collection of tools for balancing the software development process and some empirical data on the costs and benefits of agility.
In summary, I would classify Balancing Agility and Discipline as a suggested reading for both agilists and sceptics. It's not necessarily a classic but it certainly serves as a useful reminder of things the industry has learnt the hard way and shouldn't be taken too lightly. Agile methods promote retrospectives. Boehm and Turner suggest extending that retrospective a bit farther.
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful, critical, and current information.... 8 Mar 2004
By Jane Huang - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book addresses a critical and current discussion on how to balance agility and planned methods. Not only does it discuss project characteristics that identify the homeground of an individual project, but it also identifies agile practices that can be introduced into a traditional planned project, and discusses the use of planned techniques that may be needed to scale up large or critical agile projects. This is very useful material - and most certainly addresses current industry needs.
As an Asst. Professor of Software Engineering I have recently noticed a trend amongst the organizations in which my graduate students work. Several of these organizations that have historically employed traditional "waterfall" style lifecycle models are now experimenting with pilot projects that employ agile methods. They are not however deploying cookie cutter agile methods, but are selecting those agile practices that meet their own needs. My students explained that early prototype projects had indicated that applying agile processes resulted in better defect removal early in the projects.
Boehm and Turner's book addresses exactly these issues, and shows that agile and planned methods can be applied synergistically. Equally importantly the book reports on the small yet growing body of empirical results that support certain agile claims and challenge others. This provides the reader with critical information for determining which agile practices they may wish to deploy.
This book clearly reflects the years of experience both authors have had in industry and academia. As the creator of the spiral lifecycle model and the well known cost estimation model COCOMO, Boehm has a track record of correctly measuring the pulse of the industry and providing insights that have had a lasting impact. Once again, Boehm has written a book that I believe has identified a critical market trend and can provide invaluable insights for organizations seeking to find just the right balance within their own software development projects.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I probably should have given it 5 stars... 13 Aug 2005
By Corey Thompson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book succeeds brilliantly in two areas, but comes up a bit short in the third.

First, as far as distilling how plan-driven and agile-driven development methodologies are different (and the same), it is wonderful. They use five "critical factors" to determine a project's relative suitability for choosing one type over the other. I believe about 40% of the book is spent here.

Second, using the above information, the authors discuss how to ascertain and mitigate project risks, given the size and type of the application being developed, as well as the cultural (agile v. plan-driven) leanings of the development staff who will be working on it. This is mostly done at a "process framework" level. The premise of the book is that each project is somewhat different, so rightly they do not prescribe a process. I believe another 40% of the book is spent here.

Third, the book presents a number of charts showing how much impact plan-driven and agile-driven processes have had. Here I just feel like Boehm lent the book a bunch of his data. Although it is very useful data, it isn't detailed enough. It could have used an additional Appendix describing another project (there are three case studies already) more concretely. Especially in terms of the schedule, defect reduction rate, etc. metrics that are in one of the appendixes.

Overall, I highly recommend this book.
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Knowledge you should have before starting a project 22 Dec 2003
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Agility and discipline are not absolutes, but should be dosed out appropriately based on your project. The risk-management approach explained in this book is familiar to most business management folks, and provides a framework for making the right decision. This is a great way to cater a methodology to your project.
There were some "day in the life of" sections in this book that felt like fake stories -- it was almost like reading a DeMarco novel. Entertaining, but not entirely convincing. Also, contrary to Lean approaches, this risk management framework doesn't seem to lend itself to self-tuning as the project moves along (unless I missed something). There's a lot to be said for measuring how effective you're being and reacting to changes in your environment and product. The idea of doing all of your risk assessment up-front and choosing your methodology for the life of the project sounds exactly like the kind of thing that any "Agilist" would claim is not going to work!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A guide for the perplexed, but adds to the perplexity in some aspects 6 July 2007
By Erik Gfesser - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Great text. I really enjoyed reading this book by Boehm and Turner. Especially enjoyable was reading Grady Booch's comment in his forward that "there's a delightful irony in the fact that the very book you are holding in your hands has an agile pair of authors yet requires three times as many forewards as you'd find in any normal book". The material of this text is centered around the dimentions affecting method selection that the authors provide as the five critical factors involved in determining the relative suitability of agile or plan-driven methods in specific project situations. In most situations, the authors indicate that some mix of these methods will be needed after risk assessments are performed for each of the five factors. The radar plots provided that depict different levels of these five factors for example projects aid in understanding how projects differ. What is unfortunate is that the metrics for each of these factors (personnel, dynamism, culture, size, and criticality) are not explained well. Size, the number of personnel working on any given project, is the only concrete metric. However, I think the reader needs to understand that determining the level of each of the other four factors is really not meant to be exact. In fact, the presentation by the authors of various projects, although sometimes a bit detailed for the subject matter, help in the understanding that these metrics are relative. For example, unless personality tests are administered to all project personnel, it can be quite difficult to determine the level of Culture (the percent who thrive on chaos versus order), but guestimating an approximate level for this factor is probably good enough to get a sense whether agile or plan-driven methodologies are more appropriate. Of the first few chapters of the text, I think the first two chapters that provide a background to the balancing agility and discipline problem are the most effective, followed by the chapter six summary chapter that lists the top conclusions of the discussion. The appendixes to this book, which comprise almost one-third of the text, are also very informative. Thirteen software development methodologies are presented side-by-side in Appendix A to enable the ability to compare each, although admittedly some of the methodologies are covered more extensively than others. And in Appendix E, some interesting industry statistics are presented from various studies, including a discussion on how much architecting is enough for a particular project, although there is some overlap with the well-written, thorough, recently-released text by McConnell called "Software Estimation: Demystifying the Black Art" (see my review). Overall, this book fits a gap on the software development bookshelf, and I am sure that other works of this genre will be released by other authors over the next couple years, as writing on this subject matter is still in its infancy.
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