Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 

Bahama [CD]

Arnold Audio CD
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.



Amazon's Arnold Store

Visit Amazon's Arnold Store
for all the music, discussions, and more.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Oct 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Poptones
  • ASIN: B00005NMX7
  • Other Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 198,295 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Climb
2. Tiny car
3. Hangman's waltz
4. Jus de lune
5. Oh my
6. Easy
7. Boo you
8. Other son
9. Pavey ark

Product Description

Amazon.co.uk

Bahama is the third album by the plaintive London three-piece Arnold. Cocooned in their own self-referential dimension--naming themselves after their bass player's dog, preferring to record in country barns rather than top city studios and clearly oblivious to all sensible commercial considerations--Arnold couldn't be any more bloody-mindedly parochial if they moved into a commune with XTC. Perhaps that's why former Creation boss Alan McGee has now signed them for a second time. More probably, it's got something to do with their music. Bahama, the band's third album, ploughs a similar furrow to the blissed-out Radiohead / Crosby Stills Nash stylings of yore but also begs the question--how do Arnold make such a big sound so quietly? Mellow seems too violent a word. Somehow, they communicate their sleepy-eyed melancholia in a soniferous whisper of creamy close harmonies, shining acoustic guitars and cavernous echo, occasionally upping the ante with skin-tingling solo fretwork worthy of Dave Gilmour. Be it the fragile, crepuscular organ on the haunting "Jus De Lune", the polynesian guitar flavourings of "Climb" or album stand-out "Other Son"--which bobs to and fro like a fishing boat skippered by Fleetwood Mac's Peter Green - Bahama is switch-off serenity exemplified. --Kevin Maidment

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.8 out of 5 stars
4.8 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An utterly lovely album 9 Nov 2001
By A Customer
Format:Audio CD
Bahama is the sound of a band making music the way they want to, and not attempting to follow any trend or blueprint. The result being a very special album indeed.
It kicks off with the beautiful Climb - all swooning vocals and fuzzy guitars - and continues in much the same manner throughout. Apparently, this record was made 'on the cheap', but for me the production is spot on - it has a very warm sound, something which is far too rare these days.
Anther track of note is the incredibly catchy Boo You, but to be honest each track is as good as the next, and it seems very unfair to single out specific tracks for praise.
If there was any justice in this world Bahama would sell bucket loads.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Whispers Of Summer 3 Oct 2001
Format:Audio CD
Arnold return after some length of absence due to the collapse of Creation Records. But far from returning sheepishly and half heartedly they've come back stronger than ever here. Highlights include the opener 'Climb' with it's atmospheric guitars. Reminiscent of Coldplay at times. 'Oh My' is stunning, a single release and an instant classic with it's '300 days in July' lyric. Very evocative. 'Tiny Car' leans in a slightly rockier direction and the closer 'Pavey Ark' is as lovely as anything they've done. If you've not heard this band ( which given their profile is quite likely! ) I urge you to check this out. And a big hand to Alan McGhee of Poptones for re-signing them.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Arnold - Bahama 17 Dec 2012
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
A beautiful album and not just because Mark is my cousin! I love it, it lifts me up and I feel drawn into it.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
The album has a distinct feel of calm about it. It does not offend the listener in anyway, in fact there is nothing to dislike about it. This may be the only down fall of the album, with the likes of Radiohead, White Stripes and The Strokes, there are distinct qualities that make you either love them, or hate them. With these though, it is just nice. It really did not stand out as an album to rave about nor criticise. Songs such as Boo You and the last track Pavey Ark (in fact about four separate ones, 15 minutes long in total) make you realise these guys do have talent. You will enjoy it, but it will not be that memorable...
*** Sounds Like :- chilled out Coldplay, without heavy(?) guitars or a happy Elbow ***
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful piece of work 29 Oct 2001
By A reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Out of Creation and onto Poptones, the label with `deep pockets and short arms,' Bahama marks the return of that band named after a dog. Who did the song about the rabbit.
With Arnold, you can be pretty sure you will be getting dysfunction, twisted lyrics and some gorgeous guitars. From the shredded Gilmour Strat moments of opener Climb to the dense John Fry acoustics of closer Pavey Ark, these are tales of relationships that are stretched taut as those guitar strings, and others that are loose as usher's ties after a booze-soaked wedding. "I don't know which one is really you, but I love the two," claims Tiny Car, before wandering off fluttering quartertones. Cute as all hell.
Then there's the sublime single Oh My ("Days never end, 300 days of July") and you remember that this is a band formed after the death of a good friend. There is something almost recklessly sad about the Arnold sound, but their attitude towards actual depression is a robust 'been there, done that' (Boo You). They have also let some late summer sunshine in on these recordings. Some of the details are positively jaunty (the gay music teacher in Jus de Lune, the Sowetan filigree guitarwork in Easy), and this time the band doesn't sound as if it might fall apart halfway through each tune, as on 1998's The Hillside Album. More immediate and concise than that record, Bahama harks back to the band's mini debut The Barn Tapes. In today's market of 74-minute sprawlers, this barely makes it through the 40 minute mark, including the `hidden' tracks at the end. Here the mood goes kind of s*p*a*c*e*y. There's even a strange awestruck gospel shuffle (Please) that rents a room to Dillard & Clark, Exile-era Stones and Spiritualized and just lets God sort it out.
Alternatively, you could buy it just for the bonus track, Evermore for Evermore. It's that good.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful piece of work 29 Oct 2001
By A reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Out of Creation and onto Poptones, the label with `deep pockets and short arms,' Bahama marks the return of that band named after a dog. Who did the song about the rabbit.
With Arnold, you can be pretty sure you will be getting dysfunction, twisted lyrics and some gorgeous guitars. From the shredded Gilmour Strat moments of opener Climb to the dense John Fry acoustics of closer Pavey Ark, these are tales of relationships that are stretched taut as those guitar strings, and others that are loose as usher's ties after a booze-soaked wedding. "I don't know which one is really you, but I love the two," claims Tiny Car, before wandering off fluttering quartertones. Cute as all hell.
Then there's the sublime single Oh My ("Days never end, 300 days of July") and you remember that this is a band formed after the death of a good friend. There is something almost recklessly sad about the Arnold sound, but their attitude towards actual depression is a robust 'been there, done that' (Boo You). They have also let some late summer sunshine in on these recordings. Some of the details are positively jaunty (the gay music teacher in Jus de Lune, the Sowetan filigree guitarwork in Easy), and this time the band doesn't sound as if it might fall apart halfway through each tune, as on 1998's The Hillside Album. More immediate and concise than that record, Bahama harks back to the band's mini debut The Barn Tapes. In today's market of 74-minute sprawlers, this barely makes it through the 40 minute mark, including the `hidden' tracks at the end. Here the mood goes kind of s*p*a*c*e*y. There's even a strange awestruck gospel shuffle (Please) that rents a room to Dillard & Clark, Exile-era Stones and Spiritualized and just lets God sort it out. Yup, it's that good.
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatest band you've never heard of 2 Aug 2005
By N. Skally - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Take radiohead and coldplay and put them in a blender and you get Arnold. Not as consistent as those acts listed above, but a great band nonetheless.
5.0 out of 5 stars melancholy arnold 14 July 2002
By R. Hewitt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I loved Arnold's last album,Hillside,especially the cut,"Windsor Park",so when i heard a new Arnold song on the radio here on KCRW in L.A. I couldn't wait till the album was found.At first listening I let "Bahama" wash in one ear and out the other like a dip in the sea it was refreshing but left me strangely unmoved.It wasn't until I finally copped a buzz and put on the headfones in preparation for their first upcoming Los Angeles gigs that I finally swooned.Thank God for headphones!What sounded somewhat pale and fluffy before took on a new meaning.I could hear the breathy power in the over dubbed vocals,the mysterious lyrics like a sunnier version of The Church.And an overall end of summer- end of youth saddess that moved me almost to blubber mode-(the true stamp of excellence in my book)And just when you're watching the countdown to the last cut-and hoping it won't ever end-it doesn't! The last cut goes on and on, stopping and starting again with different permutations of beauty.Thanks for that guys!
I really can't wait for this weeks' Westcoast debut I'll be there ready to drink in the melancholy wine that is Arnold!
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 3 And A Half Stars 12 Feb 2002
By Ian Creamer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This album was released towards the very end of last year in the U.K.It got really great reviews in the music press and it may even have entered the various albums of the year lists only for the fact it was released so late on.Arnold are on Alan McGee's latest 'Poptones' label,which seems to be amassing an impressive list of new trendy bands.Except Arnold can hardly be described as a new band.They were signed by McGee before when he owned 'Creation' records-they achieved very little successs on this label as the companies major time and resouces seemed to be spent on his other better known projects such as Primal Scream and Oasis.In many ways I liken this group to Shack-who after many misfortunes released a fine album with H.M.S. Fable.The music isn't too dissimilar either.You could also add certain hints of Travis and Doves if you wanted to define Arnold's sound.The tracks do feature a mix of gentle laidback acoustic flavoured moods,yet they also mix in some louder and more up-beat sounds also.While it may not be the greatest album you'll hear this year,there are quite a few outstanding tracks.The opening track does as the title suggests "Climb".From a quiet and unassuming beginning this track gathers momentum with it's mix of slide and acoustic guitars.Gentle,understated harmonies that climb to an almost full scale falsetto.One of the groups strong point is the versatility of the lead vocalist.The second track is an irresistible mix of loud and quiet.The verses of gentle rhythm guitars get constantly interupted by a loud and brash thrashing of guitars.If you're into good vocals this album is a dream-there's great variety from high to low and some of the harmonies are quite unusual encompassing a wide range of styles.Another highlight of the album is track 4 "Jus De Lune"-great acoustic,backed up by a whirling organ-more harmonies in the vocals.It's a real relaxing late night track!As this album goes on it seems to slow down-track 5 "Oh My"-sounds like a louder then usual Turin Brakes.The vocals veer between a full falsetto to being almost whispered.This track is a real grower.There's a Smiths feel to the guitars in track 6-which is a really short song-regrettably so.The latter songs are not as good as the opening ones.Most of the tracks are between 2/3 minutes except for the last one which goes on for 15 minutes!This represents more then a third of the album-which sort of gives the whole thing an unbalanced fell to it.It does go on a bit!
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback