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Baffled [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC]

Leonard Nimoy    DVD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: 8.32
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Region 1 encoding (requires a North American or multi-region DVD player and NTSC compatible TV. More about DVD formats.)

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Product details

  • Actors: Leonard Nimoy
  • Format: Colour, DVD-Video, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: Unrated (US MPAA rating. See details.)
  • Studio: Scorpion Records
  • DVD Release Date: 21 Jan 2014
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00GOYC3P6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 172,769 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

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Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
3.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Baffled, but not confused... 25 Nov 2010
Format:DVD
Baffled! is a real oddity. It was the pilot for an intended weekly series made as a co-production by Arena in the US (responsible for The Man from UNCLE again produced by Norman Felton) and Britains own ITC. It would have been filmed in the UK, but like other ITC series over the years (The Saint and Danger Man) all those exotic locations would be distinctly home grown at Pinewood Studios...

That said Baffled! is a pretty good DVD. Don't buy it expecting a lost classic, but its very enjoyable and part of that enjoyment comes from a good casting and an interesting story premise.

Leonard Nimoy (the guy with the ears from Star Trek) is a playboy racing driver called Tom Kovak who suddenly develops eerie visions that are incredibly real. During a race Kovak sees a Manor House, a woman and a child, then hearing a piercing scream he veers of the track and crashes!

Watching a later TV interview is Occult expert Michele Brent (played by gorgeous Susan Hampshire better known now for her role as Molly in Monarch of the Glen) who believes what Kovak was seeing is real and that someone needs help.

Joing forces Tom and Michele are lead to a Cornish Manor House, which is now a hotel and discover a sinister plot to exact revenge upon a famous actress (Vera Miles - Psycho and The Searchers) through her daughter and late husbands partner using a strange mixture of black magic and voodoo...

Other guests at the hotel become suspects in the plot. A newly wed couple (Ray Brooks - The Knack and Angharad Rees - Hands of the Ripper) and the seemingly ageless proprietor (Rachel Roberts - Picnic at Hanging Rock).

Slowy and surely the incidious plans come to fruition...

The plot is interesting and the cast is great!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great so see this on DVD but.... 8 Mar 2013
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
I was pleased to see the release of this film on DVD after a long wait. The VHS I have is practically falling apart. The only disappointment I had when watching it is the amount of cuts in this version that have been made, some not subtle, The sequence with Mrs Farraday's disappearing harpsichord to name a few. Perhaps this is a syndicated version, which was edited for time.... It is great to see it on DVD but so disappointed it is not the full version. I still would recommend the purchase....its a good film.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Rather lackluster tale of psychic detectives 3 Oct 2012
By The CinemaScope Cat TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
A race car driver (Leonard Nimoy) has visions of an English manor house and a screaming woman (Vera Miles) during a race which causes him to crash. An expert on psychic phenomenon and the occult (Susan Hampshire) believes that he has seen something that will happen in the future and together they track down the English manor to investigate. This rather absurd piece of horror pulp was originally shot as a movie pilot for a proposed television series (Nimoy as a psychic detective with Hampshire as his romantic sidekick psychically solving a new case each week) that never sold. Despite dealing with witchcraft, there's very little suspense at all though there is one neat surprise twist at the end that I didn't see coming though it's a bit of a cheat. Directed by Philip Leacock with a cheesy 70s score by Richard Hill. With Rachel Roberts (SATURDAY NIGHT AND SUNDAY MORNING) in a nice turn as a landlady you mysteriously looks younger each day, Angharad Rees, Jewel Blanch and Ray Brooks.

The Network DVD is a decent transfer, slightly on the soft side in its proper Academy (1.33) ratio.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Pilot--Wish there had been more. 21 Jun 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
It's been a long time since I've seen this movie, but the delight I experienced has not dissipated.
Baffled is a light murder mystery, with touches of the paranormal. When Tom Kovak, a race car driver (Leonard Nimoy) starts seeing visions, he is driven to a psychologist (Susan Hampshire), to deal with the trauma. Eventually these visions help them save someone from dying.
The chemistry between Nimoy and Hampshire is good, and the movie rapidly moves along.
It was meant to be a pilot movie to a television show, but it never was made into a series. "Tom Kovak, Psychic Detective" would have made a corny, but appropriate title.
It's a pity this film is not on video at this time. I'm a big fan of Leonard Nimoy, but more than that, this film is a good example of a dry British mystery. It kept me in suspense, the location was beautiful, and the dialogue was crisp.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 70s Made-For-TV Horror is a fun find, lousy transfer. 1 Feb 2014
By Winston Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
If you are a fan of 70s-era made-for-TV horror, this will fit the bill nicely. Nimoy plays a race car driver who inexplicably starts getting psychic premonitions, which lead him to mysterious goings on at an old English castle. He brings a plucky blonde paranormal expert along for the ride. A bit X-files meets Scooby Doo at the Night Gallery. And a GREAT atmospheric soundtrack. Unfortunately the transfer is a big disappointment. You'll see distracting, blocky MPEG compression artifacts frequently (even the highest setting of noise-reduction on my TV didn't help...) and occassional horizontal tracking lines, suggesting this was sourced from tape. That said, it is a WATCHABLE transfer... comparable to some of the crappy multi-disc/public domain box sets you might find in the bargain bin.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fun movie to stream but EDITED 31 Mar 2012
By Michael Rogers - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Baffled! was a 1973 TV movie/pilot made in the UK distributed by ITC (The Muppet Show, Space:1999). It was also shown theatrically in some places. In the early 80's it was released to video by 20'th Century Fox video. Since then it was out of print until the mid 90's when it was released on another label recorded in EP. It also was edited compared to the 20'th Century Fox video version (I estimate the editing at about 5 minutes). That video is also now out of print. Now, Baffled can be streamed from Amazon, but alas has the most recent master which is the one that was used for that video and carries the edits. Still a worthy movie to check out, but I wish it was complete.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hacked to pieces 28 May 2013
By Western NY Reader - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I love this movie, but not this version (Amazon instant Video). I had it on video that I took off the TV and watched so many times I knew the dialogue by heart. Having not seen it for many years (haven't had a VCR for many years), on impulse I decided to buy it to watch on my computer. So many scenes have been shortened that if I didn't know the dialogue, I'd never be able to fully follow the story. So while its dated by the wardrobe, the movie has held up for me. But not this butchered version.
4.0 out of 5 stars Not quite so baffled 30 Jun 2014
By Anthony R. Cardno - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this for what it was: a failed television pilot from 1972. Taking into account the era in which it was filmed, it's quite fun. Despite being a supernatural thriller, there aren't much in the way of special effects to be distracted by: most of it is make-up / in-camera effects. The most glaring "wow, look how far we've come" moments are when Nimoy is being the wheel of a vehicle (his race car at the start, and a nicely-restored oldster later in the movie) and when anyone falls out of a window or off a cliff (which, between visions and actual events, happens at least 3 times that I counted). Otherwise, the mood is set by the set lighting, the actors, the wardrobe and the make-up. It's amateur-looking by modern standards, but I ignored that and just had a good time watching it.

Concept wise, I'm really surprised this concept hasn't been picked up for a remake in more recent years. Given the plethora of supernatural shows on television (mostly on the CW, but also on the major networks) as well as the number of "charming lead man investigates crimes" shows, I would think someone would have revived it.

Cast-wise: Nimoy is a charming and engaging leading man who despite the evidence around him is still not sure he's actually gained supernatural abilities until the very end of the episode. The visions are his only ability, so he still needs to think/fight his way out of tight spots the way anyone else would. Susan Hampshire is equally as engaging as Michele Brent, and there's a definite playful chemistry between the actors that makes the blooming romance between Kovack and Michele believable. The rest of the cast are listed as "guest stars" as they would be on a regular television episode. Vera Mills is perfect as Andrea Glenn, the US actress on British soil who is the intended victim of a convoluted scheme to kill her off and gain control of her daughter Jennifer (played with wonderfully eerie self-possession by Jewel Blanch). Rachel Roberts is great as hotel owner Mrs Farraday, just this side of over-the-top as she reverse-ages through the episode. And of course every British drama has to have a Grande Dame -- Valerie Taylor does a solid job as the mysterious Louise Sanford.

Plot-wise: Well, the show has a great concept but there are some unavoidable plot holes and otherwise cheesy moments. Italian houseguest Verelli's knowledge of the secret door to the wine cellar felt like it came out of nowhere, as did Michele's knowledge of the "special sign" Kovacks needed to use toward the end of the episode. During Kovack's "near-fatal" car crash at the start, the paramedic's attempts at CPR, while Kovack is still in the race car in a seated position, are laughably fake. And just who was driving the beat-up old van that follows Kovack and Michele on their little afternoon joy ride? The director assumes we'll figure it out. There are some continuity issues with what time of day things are happening. And there's a great Mission: Impossible-like moment near the end as well that's just ... well, I laughed because it felt so out of place.

I watched the 89 minute "UK Cut" of the pilot. The disc also includes a US cut that is 10 minutes longer, but I haven't had time to screen that. If/when I do, I might come back and add some thoughts to this post. Especially if some of those plot holes are filled in.
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