Bad Samaritans and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a £0.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bad Samaritans: Rich Nations, Poor Policies and the Threat to the Developing World Hardcover – 5 Jul 2007


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£317.51 £3.82


Trade In this Item for up to £0.25
Trade in Bad Samaritans: Rich Nations, Poor Policies and the Threat to the Developing World for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Books (5 July 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 190521135X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905211357
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 2.4 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,066,742 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'A smart, lively and provocative book that offers us compelling
new ways to look at globalization' -- Joseph E. Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate in Economics, 2001

'Every orthodoxy needs effective critics. Ha-Joon Chang is
probably the world's most effective critic of globalization' -- Martin Wolf, Financial Times, author of 'Why Globalization Works'

'a marvellous book. Well researched, panoramic in its scope and
beautifully written... I strongly urge you to read it'
-- Larry Elliott, Economics Editor, Guardian

'an excellent book ... the logical discipline of economics... in jargon-free prose that sparkles with anecdotes and practical observations.'
-- International Affairs, September 2007

'in this more polemical tract, he adds the spark of personal reflection ... and some mischievous rhetorical set-pieces' -- The Economist , 1 September 2007

Lucid, deeply informed, and enlivened with striking illustrations, this penetrating study could be entitled "economics in the real world." -- Noam Chomsky

Book Description

A radical look by a leading economist at the issues surrounding the future of globalization. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By C. Brenner on 29 Nov 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are so many books on poverty out there, they all seem to blur into one....Not Bad Samaritans. This book stands out as far and away the best I've ever read (and I've done post-graduate study in International Development so I've read a lot!). If you are looking for a factually balanced, well written book which is accessible to everyone, pick this!

Dr. Chang is a Professor from Cambridge University, UK and it shows. His views are a product of years of detailed reserach - everything he says is backed up with accurate and balanced data.

I recommend this book to everyone!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Too many books on 18 Aug 2008
Format: Hardcover
Bad Samaritans is a more personal and more polemical book than Ha-Joon Chang's earlier Kicking Away the Ladder, but it is still very restrained compared to most "anti-globalisation" books, and far more effective. Chang is not properly opposed to trade and markets as such, but merely argues that the current economic policies supported by the IMF and wealthy countries are hindering development and creating poverty. He bases this view not only on his very rigorous research into comparative development over his years as an economics professor, but also on his direct experience of his native South Korea's development.

Chang's brilliant riposte to Thomas L. Friedman, in the chapter "The Lexus and the Olive Tree Revisited" is worth more than the very modest cost of the book on its own. While the economics is spot-on, and very well informed, the style is easy to read, and just right for the general reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Chola Mukanga on 24 Dec 2010
Format: Paperback
I first came across the "infant industry argument" during my A-level economics class at Bearwood College. It was forever imprinted on my memory as an absurd excuse by inefficient states for protectionism. We were taught that the process to good economic development was through free trade and more importantly history and theory supported it. Of course since then I have come across fantastic papers that debunk the one sided nature of the free trade indoctrination, with Robert Driskill's `Deconstructing the argument for free trade' probably being among the best of them. However, it remains the case that this simplistic and biased view of free trade continues to dominate current development economic thinking and media punditry. Such is the scale of the challenge that the brilliant South Korean economist Ha-Joon Chang seeks to overcome in this entertaining and highly readable book. In my view the book successfully demolishes the free trade and economic development myths that are perpetuated by "neo-liberal economists" and the "bad Samaritan" institutions of the IMF, World Bank and WTO and their supporting governments.

Anyone preaching a different doctrine of development from the "neo-liberal" brigade is naturally declared a heretic and consigned to the periphery of mainstream economic thought. Not Ha-Joon Chang. A renowned development economist, who has worked as a consultant for the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, various UN agencies and many governments around the world. A recipient of the prestigious Leontief Prize and good friend of Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz, Professor Chang has published many articles on the subject, including the critically acclaimed 'Kicking Away the Ladder - Development Strategy in Historical Perspective'.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By German on 22 Mar 2011
Format: Paperback
I bought this book by chance and have to say that I was completely surprised by it's content. I was born and raised in a third world country in South America, then did a PhD in Europe and worked a little bit so I have a view on both worlds and find the content of this book very accurate, according to my own experience. What this book tells is the story of how third world countries had to struggle to survive using the rules imposed by rich countries. Many people is convinced that we always have to do as they said but recently, after years of using that formula, some countries started listening to new ideas and tried (and are still trying) to brake the vicious circle they are into.
This books explains in easy terms why is that those formulas were not working and why they are appealing to the rich countries. Thus why they impose them on the poor countries.
For people living in rich countries this book can show them the cost of their high standards of living and once they know they will be able to try to change things. This books also shows how the rich countries can grow while the poor countries also do it. So it is not an apolitical view, on the contrary, I see it as a message of hope. The more we know the more we can change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Too many books on 7 July 2008
Format: Paperback
Bad Samaritans is a more personal and more polemical book than Ha-Joon Chang's earlier Kicking Away the Ladder, but it is still very restrained compared to most "anti-globalisation" books, and far more effective. Chang is not properly opposed to trade and markets as such, but merely argues that the current economic policies supported by the IMF and wealthy countries are hindering development and creating poverty. He bases this view not only on his very rigorous research into comparative development over his years as an economics professor, but also on his direct experience of his native South Korea's development.

Chang's brilliant riposte to Thomas L. Friedman, in the chapter "The Lexus and the Olive Tree Revisited" is worth more than the very modest cost of the book on its own. While the economics is spot-on, and very well informed, the style is easy to read, and just right for the general reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback