Start reading Bad Pharma: How Medicine is Broken, And How We Can Fix It on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books even without a Kindle device-with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones and tablets.
Bad Pharma: How Medicine is Broken, And How We Can Fix It
 
 

Bad Pharma: How Medicine is Broken, And How We Can Fix It [Kindle Edition]

Ben Goldacre
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (218 customer reviews)

Print List Price: 8.99
Kindle Price: 5.98 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: 3.01 (33%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 5.98  
Hardcover --  
Paperback 6.29  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged --  
Audio Download, Unabridged 15.20 or Free with Audible.co.uk 30-day free trial
Kid's and Teen books from £0.99 on Kindle
Browse our selection of top children's and teen title in our one week sale, with top titles from only £0.99.Browse the sale here


Product Description

Review

From the reviews of Bad Science:

From an expert with a mail-order PhD to debunking the myths of homeopathy, Ben Goldacre talks the reader through some notable cases and shows how you don t need a science degree to spot bad science yourself Independent (Book of the Year)

His book aims to teach us better, in the hope that one day we write less nonsense Daily Telegraph (Book of the Year)

For sheer savagery, the illusion-destroying, joyous attack on the self-regarding, know-nothing orthodoxies of the modern middle classes, Bad Science cannot be beaten. You ll laugh your head off, then throw all those expensive health foods in the bin Trevor Phillips, Observer (Book of the Year)

Unmissable...laying about himself in a froth of entirely justified indignation, Goldacre slams the mountebanks and bullsh*tters who misuse science. Few escape: drug companies, self-styled nutritionists, deluded researchers and journalists all get thoroughly duffed up. It is enormously enjoyable' --The Times (Book of the Year)

Product Description

Ben Goldacre puts the $600bn global pharmaceutical industry under the microscope. What he reveals is a fascinating, terrifying mess. ***Now updated with the latest government responses to the book***

Doctors and patients need good scientific evidence to make informed decisions. But instead, companies run bad trials on their own drugs, which distort and exaggerate the benefits by design. When these trials produce unflattering results, the data is simply buried. All of this is perfectly legal. In fact, even government regulators withhold vitally important data from the people who need it most. Doctors and patient groups have stood by too, and failed to protect us. Instead, they take money and favours, in a world so fractured that medics and nurses are now educated by the drugs industry.

The result: patients are harmed in huge numbers.

Ben Goldacre is Britain’s finest writer on the science behind medicine, and ‘Bad Pharma’ is the book that finally prompted Parliament to ask why all trial results aren’t made publicly available – this edition has been updated with the latest news from the select committee hearings. Let the witty and indefatigable Goldacre show you how medicine went wrong, and what you can do to mend it.


Product details


More About the Author

Ben Goldacre is a doctor and science writer who has written the ' Bad Science ' column in the Guardian since 2003. His work focuses on unpicking the evidence behind misleading claims from journalists, the pharmaceutical industry, alternative therapists, and government reports. He has made a number of documentaries for BBC Radio 4, and his book Bad Science reached Number One in the nonfiction charts, has sold over 500,000 copies, and is available in 22 countries.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
90 of 91 people found the following review helpful
By andrewp
Format:Paperback
This is an impressive book on a serious subject which at times really is a matter of life and death. It can be read by anyone interested in the pharmaceutical industry, and doesn't require any previous knowledge of medicine or even science in general.

The tone is chatty enough to keep you interested, while remaining relatively well structured. I think you will get an idea of whether you would enjoy this book by first watching either of Ben Goldacre's TED talks: if you finish watching them and think "I want to know more" then this book is going to be just the thing for you.

There is no hint of conspiracy theory in this book. Goldacre sticks to a sober recounting of the problems, and he is meticulous about backing up what he says with references, with particular emphasis on systematic reviews, which is important given the subject matter of the book. He never gets into politics, but concentrates on actual, proven real-world harms and benefits.

I also appreciate that despite the massive size of the problems he's describing, he manages to avoid despair and gives recommendations appropriate for the different sections of his readership. I thought the section on conflicts of interest was subtly thought-out and proves that Goldacre is not simply "anti-pharma" and has considered carefully how things could actually be changed in practice.

It's by no means an uplifting and easy read, but it is a fantastic book and fully worth the effort. And who knows, even if you're not a healthcare professional, you may be able to contribute to solving these problems by raising awareness.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
59 of 61 people found the following review helpful
By Dr. P. J. A. Wicks VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Disclosure: I do patient reported outcomes research for top 20 pharma companies

I love science, and I love medicine. Truly, some of the most incredible inventions of our species have been the successful development of amazing compounds from antibiotics and antiretrovirals to insulin and levodopa to modern biologic drugs which help us to lead better lives despite illness. And yet, somewhere along the way, the industry that has arguably done the most to improve life for human beings (in the developed world at least) has taken a curious deviation away from science, and lost its way. As it turns out, marketing is more effective than science in persuading doctors to write prescriptions, and it's cheaper too. Full scale clinical trials are expensive, career-making (or ending), difficult, and time-consuming, and often fail to deliver anything like the transformational benefits that older (now cheap and generic) pills once did.

In this thoroughly researched, engaging, and intensely catalytic account, psychiatrist and truth-seeker Dr Ben Goldacre systematically diagnoses the faults not just with pharma, but with the entire system of evidence based medicine, in which none of us are blameless.

The broad brush strokes are that:

* Pharma builds clinical trials with what can kindly be described as "gamesmanship", systematically biases the literature by with-holding data, drags its feet to comply with transparency measures, ensures its message is heard clearer and louder than anyone else's, and on occasion gets caught doing things it knows it shouldn't.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
103 of 108 people found the following review helpful
By F Henwood TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
A new drug is developed. You want to find out if it works. How can you tell? The answer is that you count. You take two groups of people with the illness, which you hope your drug will treat. You give one of them the drug and the other with a sugar pill. You count and compare the results. Who gets better and who stays ill in each group? Then you know - as much as one can know for sure - whether the treatment in question actually works.

Well, you do have a good idea if you have done the test fairly. Remember: you must count. If you want to rig the result, then you do not count properly. In science, you must keep a record of the misses as well as the hits. If you want to cheat, then don't count the misses. Only count the hits. Count those who seem to get well after being given your new drug but don't count those who don't. Worse, you don't count bad hits - side effects, for instance, which suggest that your new drug harms rather than cures. Hide unflattering data and only publish the data that make your drug look good.

But that's not all. You can compare your new drug against a placebo as opposed to a decent version of the same drug. You can stop the trial early if you get a run of good results before any bad results spoil things. You can measure surrogate outcomes - i.e. changes in blood pressure - rather than whether people live longer if they get your drug or not. You can pay ghost writers to write up the biased results from your trials and then get academics and medics to rubber-stamp them. You can get your marketing reps to assiduously cultivate doctors who are prepared to promote your particular drug.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting (and horrifying read)
Ben Goldacre writes brilliantly. Engages the reader from the off and seems to really know how to get you riled up about the state of the pharmaceutical industry. Read more
Published 5 minutes ago by L Miller
5.0 out of 5 stars A very important and complex subject, made accessible.
As I am - sadly - in a position to tell you, healthcare across the globe is undergoing a terrible crisis. Global pharmaceutical companies are in positions of great power. Read more
Published 4 days ago by Alex Brunel
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
Ben Goldacre's best book. 'Bad Science' introduces the ideas of evidenced based medicine (and science generally), but sticks to well known examples of misleading science. Read more
Published 14 days ago by Andrew
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book - it will open your eyes
This is a book that needs to be read! Gotzsches book on the same subject covers the issues more broadly but Goldacre has a specific UK focus. Read more
Published 17 days ago by Garthl
3.0 out of 5 stars Horse to water
As is his wont Goldacre supplies some decent cud with which much rumination can be undertaken. There's some tough stuff about the ills of the Pharmaceutical Industry which, it... Read more
Published 1 month ago by Donald Bain
5.0 out of 5 stars Drug Companies Under the Spotlight
Make no mistake this book is the metaphorical foot in the door of a Colossal worldwide industry that literally affects lives. Read more
Published 1 month ago by G. D. Richards
4.0 out of 5 stars Frightening
The only thing I can fault in this book is Ben's tendency toward diplomacy. I think he's actually too kind to the pharmaceutical industry. Read more
Published 1 month ago by S.Coda
4.0 out of 5 stars this was a gift and the recipient was pleased with it. so overall,...
this was a gift and the recipient was pleased with it. so overall, pleased that I bought this and the price was compitive.
Published 1 month ago by ruth davies
5.0 out of 5 stars Scary stuff!
This is an excellently written book on a very interesting subject. The author does a great job of providing evidence for his claims.
Published 1 month ago by Joe
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Book
A cracker of a book by Goldacre. Everyone in a senior position in the NHS, or the pharmaceutical or health industry should read this. But they won't.
Published 2 months ago by amazing chester
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
Refs and footnotes broken? 0 22 days ago
See all discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


ARRAY(0xaa92e3a8)