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Bad Boy
 
 

Bad Boy [Kindle Edition]

Peter Robinson
3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £7.99
Kindle Price: £3.95 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
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Product Description

Amazon Review

In Bad Boy, as before in his impressive body of work, Peter Robinson has tackled – and mastered – a naggingly recurrent problem for crime writers: the over-familiar scenario. He grabs with both hands the notion of the male/female copper duo eternally at odds with each other and does something subtly different, always coming up with some new innovation to keep cliché firmly at bay. Here again are DCI Alan Banks and his associate DI Annie Cabbot tackling particularly knotty problems, and even though Banks is offstage for a chunk of the action (evidence, again, of Robinson ringing the changes), we are reminded why readers are so at ease with this long-running series: Banks and Cabbot are two of the most distinctive figures in the overcrowded police procedural field.

In Bad Boy, Banks’ daughter Tracy – prone to ill-considered actions -- has found herself bewitched by her flatmate’s boyfriend, whose good looks conceal a dangerous personality. He goes on the run from the police, he drags along the pliable Tracy Banks, and the threatening events that result are bad news for everyone involved – in particular, the beleaguered policeman who is also a worried parent, Alan Banks.

As aficionados know, with any Peter Robinson novel, the reader can sit back and enjoys a master of the police procedural form, with all the expected elements satisfyingly in place. DCI Banks is shortly to enjoy a television incarnation – and it’s a safe bet that the filmmakers will struggle to keep things as fresh as Robinson always manages to do. --Barry Forshaw

Review

'Riveting' (The Times)

Robinson writes with gusto . . . his tale cracks along at a satisfying lick, with splashes of dark humour along the way. (Metro)

'Plotting of a Swiss-watch precision. We are treated to a master class in the organisation of narrative.' (Independent)

'Brilliant! . . . Gut-wrenching plotting, alongside heart-wrenching portraits of the characters who populate his world, not to mention the top-notch police procedure. This one will stay with you for a long time.' (Jeffery Deaver)

Robinson writes solid, tense, police procedurals that depend on good plots, accuracy and the genuine likeability of the central character, Alan Banks. I would highly recommend BAD BOY. (www.eurocrime.co.uk)

'Excellent . . . Robinson deftly integrates Banks's personal life with an acute look at British attitudes about police, guns, and violence in this strong entry in a superb series.' (Publishers Weekly starred review)

'Realistic characters and unexpected twists will keep you gripped.' (Candis)

'A murderous psychopath presents Alan Banks with the most intensely personal challenge of the maverick detective's storied career. Superbly cinematic from the beginning to the explosive finale, this would be a thrilling movie.' (Joseph Wambaugh)

'Robinson's stories are rooted deep in his native Yorkshire, which makes them homely despite the violence . . . Down-to-earth narration gives the story an edge' (The Oldie)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 587 KB
  • Print Length: 417 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder (5 Aug 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003TSE0GA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (115 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #6,774 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Peter Robinson - leading author of British crime books. Peter grew up in Yorkshire and now divides his time between Richmond, North Yorkshire and Toronto, Canada. He is the bestselling crime writer of the critically acclaimed DCI Banks series of detective books, featuring Detective Chief Inspector Alan Banks. Peter's novels have won numerous awards in Britain, the United States, Canada and Europe, and are published in translation all over the world.

In the latest in his series of detective books, WATCHING THE DARK, DCI Banks investigates the death of a fellow officer. Could an English girl who disappeared in Estonia six years ago hold the secret at the heart of this case?

WATCHING THE DARK is the 20th in a series of crime fiction novels about DCI Banks. The TV crime series DCI Banks is in its second series.

For all fans of quality crime fiction novels, more information, news and features about both Peter Robinson and the DCI Banks crime books are available at:

Official Website: http://www.inspectorbanks.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/peterrobinsonauthor

'If you haven't encountered Chief Inspector Alan Banks before, prepare for a crash course in taut, clean writing and subtle psychology.' Ian Rankin, leading British crime writer

'[Peter Robinson deserves a place] near, perhaps even at the top of, the British crime writers' league' The Times

'Banks is one of the most fully drawn figures in this genre of fiction' New York Times

If you have enjoyed the author Lee Child, any of Mark Billingham's books or the crime writer Peter James' novels, then try bestselling crime author Peter Robinson, whether you read his books in order or dive in at his latest, WATCHING THE DARK.

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear... 4 Oct 2010
Format:Hardcover
Like other reviewers I'm a huge fan of Robinson's earlier work (I live in Leeds and was even able to go to a book signing a few years ago when he came on a promotional tour). But if I'm honest I've felt Banks has been on borrowed time since "Friend of the Devil" which was more or less a sequel to the recently televised story (and one of Robinson's best books) "Aftermath" - I won't express my disappointment with how that translated to screen here!

All the stuff Robinson has put out from FOTD onwards (not counting the short story compilation "The Price of Love" which I found moderately entertaining), has been long drawn out and tedious to read - in fact since "Playing with Fire" I've almost had the feeling someone has given Robinson a quota of pages he must fill before he's even started writing!

I'm afraid "Bad Boy" hasn't improved on things much -

I've long ago given up watching the Banks website, waiting hungrily for the next release date, so it was a total surprise to me when I wandered into the crime section of my local book shop to find a nice fresh Robinson hardback sitting there, I got a twinge of the old excitement then saw the title: "Bad Boy" I have to say it annoyed me before I'd even picked the book up, it just sounded so cheesy! Never the less I dutifully bought it and struggled through.

Without wanting to give spoilers (readers especially won't want that here as there is precious little to spoil!) all I can say is you spend three quarters of the book expecting something to happen and nothing ever does! The book actually starts quite promisingly with Banks' holiday (it was totally throw-away stuff and simply there to please Banks fans, but I took the bate) however once he comes home things start to go down the pan.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Oh so bad! 15 Aug 2010
By Annie M
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Have read and enjoyed all the previous Inspector Banks novels but this one is a long disappointment. The plot is very thin, the dialogue turgid -with long speeches instead of dialogue. Set pieces such as the torture scene sit uncomfortably within the framework of the story- out of context. Peter Robinson writes without confidence -he is relying heavily on a formula, rather than injecting life and sparkle.
His hero seems tired of life at the end when he says"But sometimes I think I've had enough. I'm getting a bit tired of it all."
Like Ian Rankin and Rebus, Peter Robinson also seems to have exhausted his hero and this reader.
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62 of 66 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very Disappointing 8 Aug 2010
By kmax
Format:Hardcover
Havng read all of Peter Robinson's Inspector Bank's books, in my opinion, this is the worst. His early books such as 'Cold is the Grave' and 'Wednesday's Child', to name but a few, were by far much better stories. I can remember reading them in one sitting, unable to put them down. But not so with this one. The story trundles along at a very slow pace. I use the term 'story' loosely as the whole book is quite simply about a girl who takes her boyfriends gun. When her mother finds it she reports her to the police. Cue DCI Alan Banks, who then tries to find the boyfriend. It really is as simple as that and I'm afraid it all gets very tedious.

'All the Colours of Darkness', Peter Robinson's previous novel was a turning point for me. It was unbelieveable, silly at times and the story was disjointed and uninteresting. Until then, I enjoyed all his Alan Bank's series and Robinson was one of my favourite authors. I wish he would return to form as I used to enjoy getting his latest book, knowing it would be an excellent read. I will probably purchase his next book in the hope that he will return to writing intense, complex and interesting DCI Alan Banks mysteries, but after 2 very disappointing books, this seems wishful thinking.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars rather a disappointment 15 Aug 2010
Format:Hardcover
Iam a big fan of peter Robinson and inspector Banks but I felt this novel was rather disappointing. The story was slow to start and never really got going. I was expecting twists that never transpired. However this will not prevent me from looking forward to the next book
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fans only 26 Aug 2010
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Very disappointing; I decided to give him another chance despite a noticeable dropping off in the last few books, onlt to find Banks, the main character, in America navel gazing while a plot creaks into life in the UK. Bank's daughter is thrust into prominence but is as clueless as they come, some topical elements eg tazers are introduced, but a lot of this sort of thing- including the usual product placement of trendy music, is being done better elsewhere. Wait for the paperback if you are a fan.
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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but not his best 23 Aug 2010
By Bluebell TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I've read all of Peter Robinson's Inspector Banks novels, except All the Colours of Darkness which I decided not to buy after reading reviews on Amazon which alerted me to the excess of musical references, an aspect of the author's writings that I've always found irritating, plus the less than plausible story-line. I see that other reviewers of Bad Boy were disappointed by the novel, whereas I enjoyed it. It's certainly not the same class of some of his earlier novels, such as In a Dry Season or The Summer That Never Was: An Inspector Banks Novel. I thought the story hung together well and was pacy enough to have me turning the pages wanting to find out what happened next. There weren't too many diversion into Banks extraneous personal problems, except of course those concerning his daughter, which are central to this story.

By skipping the previous novel in the series I've obviously missed out on Banks failed relationship with Sophia and the transformation of his daughter Tracy from nice girl to aimless and rebellious drifter hanging out with drug dealers, which was a real surprise. I like the characters, DI Annie Cabbot and the laconic DS Winsome Jackman and am glad that Banks may be about to get back into a relationship with Annie

As seems par for the course in most detective fiction, Banks has to be a bit of a maverick, bending police protocol, with over-bearing superiors out to get him; and have failed personal relationships.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Bad Boy
Another great book from a great writer, I have read all the Inspector Banks books to date and now I get to watch them on television, if you haven't read one yet, now's a good time... Read more
Published 11 days ago by SteB
5.0 out of 5 stars Bad Boy
Enjoyed this book more than the previous two books in the series.
Realistic storyline and found it hard to put down.
Published 1 month ago by Linda Gurran
5.0 out of 5 stars Bad boy
I loved this one, it gave a different perspective to Banks, his life, family. the storyline was gripping. Can't wait to read the next book.
Published 1 month ago by julier
1.0 out of 5 stars Written with the left hand.
On the very first page: The farmers managed to bail the hay - oh me oh my - they harvest their grain! Read more
Published 2 months ago by Soeren Pedersen
5.0 out of 5 stars Bad boy
As always with DCI Banks stories, gripping tale well told. Unfortunately only one book left till I have read the lot!
Published 2 months ago by MR RICHARD A RYCROFT
5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the best DCI Banks book
I am working my way through the entire series in order and I think this is the best one yet. Full of suspense, with a few twists and turns, and sufficient detail to be graphic... Read more
Published 2 months ago by Keith Lumley
5.0 out of 5 stars good read
I have read all the books in this series and enjoyed them all - sit down, read, enjoy, order the next one.
Published 3 months ago by Ms. Patricia Conaty
5.0 out of 5 stars Great price and Great Book
A great read and hubby was impressed with this book. All peter Robinsons books are good. My husband likes them all and really enjoyed:)
Published 4 months ago by donna blackband
5.0 out of 5 stars The best so far.
I have most of Peter Robinson's SCI Banks books. This one is has had me not wanting to put it down. Can't wait for the next one.
Published 8 months ago by DavidH
3.0 out of 5 stars Not hs best
Not his best - there is little suspense and once again a relative is the main subject of the story. It also seems that everyone in the last few books either takes drugs or drinks... Read more
Published 9 months ago by Lili
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wasn’t restless, he usually felt a kind of vague, mellow sadness punctuated by the occasional eruption of anger or irritation. There had been moments of bliss, of course, but they were infrequent and ephemeral, and he often wondered whether such a moments could ever be sustainable. Was that the nature of happiness? That it came and went like a breath of desert air? &quote;
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Norma Waterson’s solo album and turned out the overhead light as that beautifully forlorn voice started singing ‘Black Muddy River’, one of his favourite late-period Grateful Dead songs. &quote;
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