Buy used:
£5.48
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £9.99

Back to the Blues

5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

Available from these sellers.
5 new from £30.79 5 used from £5.48

Amazon's Dinah Washington Store


Product details

  • Audio CD (31 Mar. 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Roulette
  • ASIN: B000005H7Y
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 280,960 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
3:48
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
2
30
2:14
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
3
30
3:52
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
4
30
2:41
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
5
30
5:01
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
6
30
2:25
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
7
30
3:12
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
8
30
2:42
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
9
30
3:46
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
10
30
2:13
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
11
30
2:36
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
12
30
8:42
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
13
30
2:36
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
14
30
2:07
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 
15
30
4:14
Play in Library Buy: £0.99
 

Product Description

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Amazon.co.uk

Although she was one of the most powerful and moving of the jazz singers, Dinah Washington suffered more than most from unimaginative and erratic backings. Many of her EmArcy recordings, notably those with Clifford Brown or Clark Terry on trumpet, had outstanding performances, but her collections were compromised by unsuitable accompaniment. This set of 15 blues gives a lop-sided picture in that it doesn't include any of her ballad performances. However, the basic big band settings allow the power and verve of her singing to come through, and confirm her as the best of the women singers with blues material. During the 1950s she had been regarded as an R&B performer but arranger and band-leader Fred Norman wrote these fine 1962 jazz settings for her shortly before her death. The material is strong and Washington soars and swings, her voice reaching many of the potent climaxes for which she was so highly regarded. The material runs through much of the traditional repertoire--Big Bill Broonzy, Leroy Carr and Lil Green being represented--and there is a nine-minute "Nobody Knows The Way I Feel This Morning" that is unique in her discography. --Steve Voce

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Lonya TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Mar. 2006
Format: Audio CD
A woman cryin' for her man.
So begins Dinah Washington's "Back to the Blues" a wonderful album from a performer of great talent who died too young.
When I was a kid my father, a studio musician, would let me tag along with him when he had a recording date. One year, when I was about 9, he took me along to a session in mid-town Manhattan. We got there and waited, and waited. The studio musicians were sitting around playing cards, smoking, and telling jokes. I asked what was going on and he told me that Dinah Washington was scheduled to come in to record, she had a lot of `problems' and usually came in about 3-hours late. The musicians didn't mind all that much since they were getting paid by the hour. Sure enough, Dinah Washington (who I didn't know at all) strolled in and it was apparent, even to a 9-year old that she wasn't quite clear-eyed. But after a while the musician got themselves together and she stepped up to the microphone, opened her mouth and out came these sounds from a place I never knew existed. I knew nothing about music generally or the blues specifically but even I knew that something special was going on. I remember hearing that Dinah died about a year later of an accidental overdose of alcohol and sleeping pills. She was only 39 years old. So when I listen to "Back to the Blues" today I can't help but think that the tracks I heard her lay down that day found their way into this album.
As the title suggests "Back to the Blues" marked a return for Dinah to her blues roots. She was comfortable and very successful in the pop, jazz, and R&B arenas. Sad to say, some of her older fans resented her success as something of a crossover artist.
Read more ›
2 Comments 13 of 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this CD as a present for my Father who has been a lifelong fan.

I know very little about Dinah's music but would descibe this album as a collection of mostly slow and moody blues. I love listening to this album late at night when all is quiet and there are no distractions . I can sink into a comfy armchair with a nice malt and Dinah
Comment 2 of 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8f4bd684) out of 5 stars 20 reviews
47 of 47 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f110660) out of 5 stars The Blues ain't nothin' but 14 Mar. 2006
By Lonya - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
A woman cryin' for her man.

So begins Dinah Washington's "Back to the Blues" a wonderful album from a performer of great talent who died too young.

When I was a kid my father, a studio musician, would let me tag along with him when he had a recording date. One year, when I was about 9, he took me along to a session. We got there and waited, and waited. The studio musicians were sitting around playing cards, smoking, and telling jokes. I asked what was going on and he told me that Dinah Washington was scheduled to come in to record, she had a lot of `problems' and usually came in about 3-hours late. The musicians didn't mind all that much since they were getting paid by the hour. Sure enough, Dinah Washington (who I didn't know at all) strolled in and it was apparent, even to a 9-year old that she wasn't quite clear-eyed. But after a while the musician got themselves together and she stepped up to the microphone, opened her mouth and out came these sounds from a place I never knew existed. I knew nothing about music generally or the blues specifically but even I knew that something special was going on. I remember hearing that Dinah died about a year later of an accidental overdose of alcohol and sleeping pills. She was only 39 years old. So when I listen to "Back to the Blues" today I can't help but think that the tracks I heard her lay down that day found their way into this album.

As the title suggests "Back to the Blues" marked a return for Dinah to her blues roots. She was comfortable and very successful in the pop, jazz, and R&B arenas. Sad to say, some of her older fans resented her success as something of a crossover artist. No matter what the reason for her decision "Back to the Blues" is an example of Washington at her finest. The album starts with her plaintive "The blues ain't nothin' but a woman cryin' for her man" and takes off from there. The arrangements, most by jazz arranger Fred Norman and two by Don Costa, are lush as one might expect from the early 60s but Dinah's voice take center stage. Among my favorite tracks were "It's a mean old man's world" and "Nobody knows the way I feel this morning". The album contains three bonus tracks that did not appear on the original vinyl LP: "Don't say nothing at all"; "No one man"; and "Me and my gin". The tracks have been remastered and the sound quality is reasonably decent.

If you are already a fan of Dinah you don't need me to `sell' you on this CD. If you are new to Dinah Washington this CD is as good a place as any to start.
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x913c57f8) out of 5 stars DINAH SINGS TO YOUR SOUL ! 23 Aug. 1998
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This cd takes you places some jazz artist just wish they could find! Blues and Jazz fans will enter the dark, sad, smokey world of Dinah when she belts out the lyrics of "Its a mean old man's world" and if you don't "see" the world a little differently when she tells you "Nobody knows how I feel this morning" then you are truly a blessed person. If you've ever loved and lost or had a broken heart then Dinah knows your pain and she sure does sing to your heart. This is truly one of the best blues cd's I've heard in many years. That sweet voice will leave you wanting more and more and more.
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f74bcb4) out of 5 stars A Tornado in Heat 27 Aug. 2000
By Peter - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This CD gets better with every listen! Dinah recorded these songs just over a year before her untimely death (age 39!). Though her voice sounds rough around the edges on some selections here, it all works to her advantage because it only adds to the down-home, blues-beltin' mama that many listeners associate Dinah with. Arrangements are usually a large orchestra with occasional strings added in but it's very much Dinah's voice that takes center stage here. Dinah knew her critics were blasting her for leaving the blues world for pop a few years back, so this was her way to make peace with them. But the listeners are the ones who win out because her rich, knowing voice goes thru 15 songs here like a tornado in heat.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f2ab774) out of 5 stars Dinah's Best Blues 21 Dec. 2005
By Truth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
A great album! Dinah sings the Blues in her Jazzy, sophisticated-yet-accessible, no-nonsense way. The 15 songs/tracks are all must-haves - even her lyrically dyslexic reading of "No One Man". Recorded July & November 1962.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9230e894) out of 5 stars Great late album 9 April 2009
By Sasha - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Great Dinah Washington went full circle with this album - she started as blues singer (at least on the records,her real beginnings were in church but she never recorded gospel and refused to do it once she went "commercial",explaining it would be sin to mix different music genres),than became pop-crossover singer who could do jazz at the drop of the hat and at the end of her tragically short life she recorded this album where blues was again the main focus.
Gifted with particulary expressive voice that easily transcended genres,Washington was one in a million - true original on and off stage - her voice can instantly be recognised in a crowd and she sang passionately in general,no matter what producers threw at her.
You wanna blues - she did "Evil Gal Blues" and "Baby get lost" long originally.
Jazz standards - she recorded whole albums tribute to Bessie Smith and Fats Waller,not to mention her swinging work with Quincy Jones.
Mainstream pop ballads - "What a difference a day makes",her "Grammy" award.
Just a year she would suddenly bow out of stage forever,Washington recorded this stunning blues album where centerpiece must be old "Nobody knows the way I feel this morning" recorded in 1920s by Alberta Hunter. Washington knew her blues well and add-libbed lyrics as famous old blues queens used to do ("Blues is nothing but a woman cryin' for her man"),her voice miraculously preserved and obviously talent was still here although jazz critics couldn't stomach her commercial success - she was great as ever,switching gears between commercial pop ballads and any music she wanted.
"How long,how long blues" and "Key to the highway" were actually gospel dressed up as blues,backing choir and all,curious exception in Washington's discography since she refused to sing gospel once she left Sallie Martin church choir in Chicago.
Its tempting to think how would her career continue had she lived longer - Ray Charles moved into country,Sam Cooke went pop,young Aretha and the whole soul music thing came along,Washington would probably rule Las Vegas and pal along with Sinatra,recording thematic albums along the way and very probably pulling the shots from the background,discovering and promoting new talents.
As it happened,it was not meant to be and this was one of her last albums.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback