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Bach: Violin Concertos [Import]

Trevor Pinnock, Johann Sebastian Bach, Isabelle Faust Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: 6.49 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
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Bach: Violin Concertos + Bach: Brandenburg Concertos; Orchestral Suites
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Product details

  • Audio CD (4 Aug 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B00000E2NY
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,921 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, BWV 1041 - 1. (Allegro moderato)Simon Standage 3:380.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, BWV 1041 - 2. AndanteSimon Standage 7:180.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, BWV 1041 - 3. Allegro assaiSimon Standage 3:290.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concerto No.2 in E, BWV 1042 - 1. AllegroSimon Standage 7:421.09  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concerto No.2 in E, BWV 1042 - 2. AdagioSimon Standage 6:390.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concerto No.2 in E, BWV 1042 - 3. Allegro assaiSimon Standage 2:350.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Johann Sebastian Bach: Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D minor, BWV 1043 - 1. VivaceSimon Standage 3:430.79  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Johann Sebastian Bach: Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D minor, BWV 1043 - 2. Largo ma non tantoElizabeth Wilcock 6:350.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Johann Sebastian Bach: Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings, and Continuo in D minor, BWV 1043 - 3. AllegroElizabeth Wilcock 4:320.79  Buy MP3 


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
By I. Giles TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
I have owned this recording,originally published in 1983, ever since it first appeared. Unusually for an avid collector, it has not been joined by many others and all of those have finally gone by the wayside leaving this one version remaining.

This is very much a 'period' recording without the fuller tone and extra vibrato used by players with modern orchestral instruments. However it must be stressed that this is not an example for the problems encountered by purchasers of early 'period' recordings as by now problems such as tuning issues and acerbic tone quality had been totally overcome. The English Consort under the guidance of Trevor Pinnock were very much at the forefront of this advance in playing technology. Both the soloists, Simon Standage and Elizabeth Wilcock, were also very much in the forefront of this advance with Standage being a regular soloist.

As a result of all the above we are able to hear this music as close to the original expectations of Bach as we are likely to achieve given sympathetic interpretations. These we have here. These are not played in a metrical way as was sometimes done in the cause of 'period' performances. Instead there is enough flexibility to allow this music to breathe and flow naturally. That, coupled with the technical accuracy, makes for a potent mix and that is why I have not felt any need to replace this recording over many years.

Needless to say Pinnock and his expert orchestra give exemplary support and the whole disc is recorded with clarity and an appropriate measure of acoustic warmth.

I would suggest that this is a fine disc which should give most purchasers considerable satisfaction for years.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Recording of Bach's Violin Concertos 19 May 2009
By Mark
Format:Audio CD
This recording of J.S Bach's violin concertos is by far the best I have heard. Simon Standage's violin solos are truly amazing. Under the direction of Trevor Pinnock one should expect high quality and this is no exception. This cd won't leave your collection - it's fantastic.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
If you prefer your Bach on period instruments, then this probably the best that there is. The speeds are well judged in my opinion. At no point do they seem too slow, which can make this music seem quite tedious, or so fast that the beauty of the music is lost. In the double violin concerto the two soloists work well together, and not adversarial as some recordings appear. Throughout the solosist(s) are well heard without being brought forward. The harpsicord continuo is just right, well balanced without dominating. The only critism I would make is that the CD contains less than 50 minutes of music, so could easily have accomodated another piece. Overall, highly recommended.
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5 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent 23 Sep 2010
By R. John
Format:Audio CD
If you're going to buy a CD - buy this one! It's great, especially played V loud.
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Amazon.com: 4.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glorious Performances 21 Mar 2007
By David A. Wend - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The date when Johann Sebastian Bach composed his violin concertos is not known but there are six concertos written for the instrument: four written for a single soloist; one for two players and one for three players. Three of the concerti have been lost, their music preserved from arrangements made for other instruments. The three works on this disc for solo violin are original.

The first concerto, BWV 1041, opens with a tutti section in the fashion of a Vivaldi concerto; indeed if one did not know this was Bach the first guess would be Vivaldi. The final movement is a fugue and is noticeably more typical of the Bach of the Brandenburg Concertos. The second concerto, BWV 1042, is instantly recognizable as Bach with its bold opening chords; the melodies are beautifully conceived and the shaping of the music is highly original and striking. The finale is a rare rondo played tutti before the soloist enters. The third concerto (BWV 1043) is for two violins and opens with a fugue. The soloists play each melody, one leading and one following. A stately slow movement is followed by a magnificent and energetic finale.

This is a marvelously played disc with excellent performances by Simon Standage and Elizabeth Wilcock (in the double concerto). As always, the English Concert play with real passion and Trevor Pinnock directs from the Harpsichord. The only problem is that the disc is only 46 minutes long. This would be a more competitive CD if there were additional music but, this aside, the superb performance makes this one worth having.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comparison of Four Period-Instrument Performances 2 Feb 2008
By Leslie Richford - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750): Violin Concertos in A minor (BWV 1041) and E major (BWV 1042); Concerto in D minor for Two Violins (BWV 1043). Performed by Simon Standage and Elizabeth Wilcock, violin, and the English Concert, directed from the harpsichord by Trevor Pinnock. Recorded in 1983 at the Henry Wood Hall in London, England. Published in 1983 as Deutsche Grammophon Archiv 410 646-2. Total playing time: 45'47".

Let me say right from the start that my four-star evaluation is perhaps a little strict, but I wanted to make a difference between this CD and one or two others that I found to be even better.

I own four "historically informed" recordings of Bach's beautiful violin concertos, and I would like to contrast and compare them here. For want of a better method I will take them in chronological order.

The oldest is the L'Oiseau-Lyre CD of this repertoire made in 1981 or 1982 by Jaap Schröder with Christopher Hirons as second violin and accompanied by a group of musicians from the Academy of Ancient Music, directed by Christopher Hogwood (Johann Sebastian Bach: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 / Concerto for 2 Violins - The Academy of Ancient Music. In addition to its glorious Decca engineering, this CD has the advantage of a fairly small group of players (string distribution 3-3-2-2-1), making for great transparency of sound. Jaap Schröder takes the concertos with wonderful lightness of touch and a relaxed feel about his playing, stressing the dance-like rhythms in Bach's music. The solo violin (violins on the double concerto) are placed in the foreground, and the bass line is not so heavy as on some of the other recordings. In the Double Concerto, Christopher Hogwood replaces the harpsichord with a chamber organ, which, if you listen carefully, seems to me to be ideal and to give the concerto just the right "feeling". This is a grandiose piece of musicianship!

The Standage/Wilcock/Pinnock recording was made during 1983, and its perhaps most outstanding characteristic is the incredibly good Deutsche Grammophon engineering, which yields a wonderfully pure, spacious sound. The performance itself is excellent, no doubt, but I found myself querying some points. Firstly, there are the tempi; Pinnock takes the fast outer movements faster than anyone else, and although the difference is not world-shattering, I felt that Christopher Hogwood's slightly more relaxed approach did the music good. But it is in the slow central movements that Standage/Pinnock really differentiate themselves: they take these a good deal more slowly than anyone else, and despite the beauty of Simon Standage's violin tone, I found this to be somewhat soporific. Was this a step towards that "nobility" of tone which has often been noted in the English Concert's later recordings with Deutsche Grammophon? Be that as it may, it was the slow movements which made me feel that somehow Pinnock had put the brake on and was no longer allowing the ebullience and fire of some of his earlier Bach recordings (e.g. the Overtures and Brandenburg Concertos).

The third recording comes, from my European perspective, from a very unexpected quarter: It was recorded in 1993 at St. Stephen's Church, Belvedere, California by a group I had never heard of before, the Arcangeli Baroque Strings, with leader Michael Sand as soloist in the A minor concerto and together with Lisa Weiss on the Double Concerto, and with Elizabeth Blumenstock as soloist in the E major Concerto. The disc also includes the reconstructed concerto for 3 Violins after BWV 1064 (with Lisa Grodin as third soloist): Bach: Violin Concertos. The Arcangeli Baroque Strings have practically only one player to a part (first and second violins have two players each, but including the soloist; there is one each of viola, cello, violone and harpsichord). This makes, even more than on Christopher Hogwood's recording, for absolute transparency of sound (this is not only due to Music and Arts' excellent engineering). The tempi are somewhere in the middle between Schröder/Hogwood and Standage/Pinnock, very pleasant indeed, but it is the passionate violin playing which really makes this disc the best I think I have ever heard of this repertoire: unbelievably good (although the Double Concerto does not, in my opinion, work quite so well as the other concertos on the disc). The US West Coast early music scene has set a benchmark here which it will be difficult for anyone anywhere to outdo.

The last of my four recordings was made at some time during the 90's (the sparse documentation is hardly worth the name and gives no details). It is by Australian baroque violinist Elizabeth Wallfisch and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, which is here also directed by Elizabeth Wallfisch: Bach: Violin Concertos. There are pros and cons to be heard here. It would seem that the ensemble is larger than on most other recordings, and the bass line is decorated by Paul Nicholson on the harpsichord (which can be clearly heard, which is definitely not the case on the Pinnock recording). The tempi here are moderate, slightly slower perhaps than I would have wished, but there is a good deal of emphasis on the rhythmic aspects of the music. Elizabeth Wallfisch's violin is embedded in the group and not always quite so easy to hear as the soloists on the other recordings; her playing is, as usual, wonderful, although there are occasions when I felt that there was a slight harshness of tone which did not always become the music.

As a footnote, I should perhaps say that only the Schröder/Hogwood disc gives details of all the instruments used, something that seems to have gone out of fashion, but which I feel should be part and parcel of a good period-instrument performance.

To summarize, I would say that the Sand/Blumenstock/Arcangeli Baroque Strings is the disc to go for if you are looking for a recording of this repertoire that can take your breath away. If it is no longer available, as is unfortunately often the case with benchmark recordings on small labels, then personally, I would go for the Schröder/Hogwood next. If price is a criterium, then the Wallfisch/OAE is available at budget price, both in a 2CD set and in a 4CD package together with the Brandenburg Concertos. The Standage/Pinnock is, of course, also a brilliant recording, but personally I would recommend it only as a second choice.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A leading contender for a 'period' recording of these works 27 Dec 2012
By I. Giles - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I have owned this recording,originally published in 1983, ever since it first appeared. Unusually for an avid collector, it has not been joined by many others and all of those have finally gone by the wayside leaving this one version remaining.

This is very much a 'period' recording without the fuller tone and extra vibrato used by players with modern orchestral instruments. However it must be stressed that this is not an example for the problems encountered by purchasers of early 'period' recordings as by now problems such as tuning issues and acerbic tone quality had been totally overcome. The English Consort under the guidance of Trevor Pinnock were very much at the forefront of this advance in playing technology. Both the soloists, Simon Standage and Elizabeth Wilcock, were also very much in the forefront of this advance with Standage being a regular soloist.

As a result of all the above we are able to hear this music as close to the original expectations of Bach as we are likely to achieve given sympathetic interpretations. These we have here. These are not played in a metrical way as was sometimes done in the cause of 'period' performances. Instead there is enough flexibility to allow this music to breathe and flow naturally. That, coupled with the technical accuracy, makes for a potent mix and that is why I have not felt any need to replace this recording over many years.

Needless to say Pinnock and his expert orchestra give exemplary support and the whole disc is recorded with clarity and an appropriate measure of acoustic warmth.

I would suggest that this is a fine disc which should give most purchasers considerable satisfaction for years. At the very least it should be considered as one of a very short short-list of possibilities to consider.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful CD 16 April 2011
By S. Steel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
I bought this CD several years ago. It arrived brand new as promised and has been wonderful to listen to ever since. A great experience.
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