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Bach: The 6 Cello Suites
 
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Bach: The 6 Cello Suites

11 May 2006 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:18
30
2
3:39
30
3
2:36
30
4
2:53
30
5
3:18
30
6
1:46
30
7
3:33
30
8
2:55
30
9
2:02
30
10
4:22
30
11
3:05
30
12
2:36
30
13
3:10
30
14
3:33
30
15
3:00
30
16
4:15
30
17
3:06
30
18
3:30
Disc 2
30
1
3:54
30
2
3:44
30
3
3:18
30
4
4:14
30
5
4:50
30
6
2:41
30
7
6:01
30
8
5:00
30
9
2:07
30
10
3:26
30
11
4:22
30
12
2:15
30
13
4:24
30
14
7:04
30
15
3:37
30
16
4:05
30
17
3:46
30
18
4:00

Product details

  • Original Release Date: 1 Jan 2006
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Avie Records
  • Copyright: 2006 AVIE Records
  • Total Length: 2:08:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001LFHFGK

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Humility and poise capture the nature of this music 21 Jan 2006
By Mario Delucchi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Overtime, I have warmed to over 20 accounts of these six suites for solo cello on compact disc. Few I have taken back or given away and few I have reverred as superlative readings of a "desert-island" status. Inspite of many mixed feelings which seemed to slowly melt away after repeated listenings, this has become one of the latter. It is indeed one of the most superb accounts of Bach's cello suites, but one that will come over terribly boring upon first hearing or from superficial comparisons with other more immediately exciting versions. That was my first impression. I had been listening obsessively to Mischa Maisky's second recording on Deutche Gramophone, a bold and wildly abstract version that stands all in a category of its own. This too was a challenge for me to appreciate, but I eventually did. Such is the nature of these suites...an inner fabric seems to run through the music that is so strong and inexplicable it can withstand an unusually broad degree of personal interpretation. But Mensesses could sound dull and monochromatic in comparison to many versions, needless to say Maisky. But one must keep listening. One must realize his intent is not to color the suites, like a Maisky, a Wispelwey or a Haimovitz (thankfully!). His approach is not one that instantly spills its virtues in the first few bars--a rich, muscular double stop, a bouyant rythymn, distinct accents or vibrato, unexpected rubato. But what meretricious effects compared to the greater virtues of this vastly underrated Meneses! What one marvels at in Menesses is the indefatigable consistency and humility with which he plays. He eschews the temptation to import color or variety, and effortlessly draws out the infinite variety inherint in the musical lines themselves. The very architecture of a minuet or gavottee is illuminated, its inner voices speak like repeating mantras and their play in that grand architecture is revealed. This he chooses over a charming dancelike sway that, inspite of its delights, is the same old thing every time you hear it. This is the revelation of Meneses's interpretation. His tone is perfect--dry but rich and warm at the same time, like an aged Marsala, and always pure, never trying to disguise its identity. Bach had a near obsessive humility his entire life. Menseses, more than any performer, reflects that. And there is a detached serenity to his performance that you will find most rewarding, if not absolutely mesmerizing, provided you merely give him a chance.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Excellent performances 2 Sep 2010
By Mr. Get Real - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have more than a dozen or so of these performances. I found Meneses just as good as any of those in the upper third of my collection - highly recommended. Just so you know where I am coming from, I do not like Ma or Rostapovich. All of Ma's versions seem too "sterile" and Rostapovich is too "dreary". The classic recording of Casals and both recordings of Starker are favorites of mine. I also like the more recent one by Queyras.
The Most Beautifully Recorded Bach Cello Suites I Have Heard 20 Sep 2013
By Jo-Jo Made it Go - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The two Bach Cello Suite recordings that work best for me, personally, are this one- by the talented Antonio Meneses- and the Steven Isserlis' Hyperion recording from 2007. Both are outstanding, and you could not go wrong either way. But what gives this performance a slight advantage over Isserlis is the outstanding sound quality. I have never heard a more beautifully recorded cello. It really is reference quality. The engineers at Avie deserve credit for their expertise.

Meneses' performance captures the mood of each piece perfectly, but where he really shines is in the slower movements. While never sounding melodramatic or overt, he manages to reveal the subtle texture and emotion imbued in each line. You get the sense here that Meneses is 100% focused and committed to the purity of these works- yet his playing style is relaxed and lyrical. A performance that feels this effortless can easily carry you along the stream of Bach's immense intellect, imagination, and vision, or sweep you up in the euphoria of any given passage, without ever once calling to attention the tireless work that goes into mastering this instrument. If I were to offer any criticism at all, it would be that the first two movements of the E-flat major suite are a little slow and deliberate for my taste, but this is a matter of personal interpretation and in no way takes away from my appreciation of such an exceptional recording. You owe it to yourself to experience Bach this way. Five stars.
Good performance! 8 Aug 2012
By la_longue_carabine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This a good performance of the bach cello suites. The simplicity of playing and the clearness of sound are admirable. This is a rendition positionable in the third best of all the performances available. For the precision, available. In fact, the best performance of the cello suites is, in my opinion, that of Daniil Shafran, and I'm lucky to possess it.Johann Sebastian Bach: The Six Cello Suites
8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
A fine, matter-of-fact-performance, but not for all tastes 1 Dec 2005
By E. Davis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
There is much to admire in these performances just as there is much to dislike. I think one can say that about most performances of these suites. Meneses seems to do better (in my view) in the minor key suites (#2, #5). He rips through the Prelude of the first suite in lightning fashion as Rostropovich does. I don't find this very musical. I was surprised that he played the Courante slower than many others play. If you like a more leisurely Bach, this is definitely not for you. More than any other performer I have heard, he conveys the sorrow of the d minor Sarabande. It is an achingly beautiful rendition. I like what he does with the C major Gigue, but the rest of this suite left me cold.

I was puzzled by his approach to the E-flat suite. He takes the Prelude much faster than I am used to hearing and just when you think he is going to roar through this suite, the Allemande is soft and unfocused, but the double stops are nicely done. But he gets the Gigue just right. I think he gets the c minor suite just right except for the annoying breathing I hear and the bowing. My feeling is that if I am hearing the bow, something is not right.

The Prelude of the D major suite is taken too fast for my taste, but the Allemande is quite lovely. Intonation throughout is impeccable. Meneses's approach to these suites is quite modern. His playing is brisk throughout (except of course in the Sarabandes) and often the sheer speed with which he plays loses some of the music's beauty. None of the elegance of Fournier here. This is a very straightforward reading in a very modern style and if that appeals to you, then he is your guy. Note values are strictly adhered to (except for the D in the Prelude of the first suite which is extended). There is virtually no use of rubato (unlike Yo-Yo ma and Starker). For those who don't know this music well or are not musicians, I would recommend the set on Philips by Maurice Gendron for a modern instrument traversal. For those looking for a set played on a baroque cello, I would recommend Jaap ter Linden. (I have not heard the second version by Anner Bylsma.) I have about seven or eight different versions of these suites.
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