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Bach: Easter Oratorio; Cantata BWV 249 /Herreweghe [CD]

Philippe Herreweghe Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Mar 1995)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Harmonia Mundi
  • ASIN: B00000079U
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 214,496 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 1. SinfoniaCollegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe 4:08£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 2. AdagioCollegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe 3:27£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 3. Chorus "Kommt, eilet und laufet"Collegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe 5:10£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Oster-Oratorium, Bwv 249: 4. Recitativo (Satb) "O Kalter Männer Sinn"Barbara Schlick, Kay Wessel, Philippe Herreweghe, Collegium Vocale Gent and James Taylor 1:04£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 5. Aria (S) "Seele, deine Spezereien"Barbara Schlick, Philippe Herreweghe and Collegium Vocale Gent 9:29£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 6. Recitativo (ATB) "Hier ist die Gruft"Collegium Vocale Gent, Philippe Herreweghe, Kay Wessel and James Taylor0:49£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 7. Aria (T) "Sanfte soll mein Todeskummer"Collegium Vocale Gent, Philippe Herreweghe and James Taylor 7:41£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 8. Recitativo (A) "Indessen seufzen wir"Collegium Vocale Gent, Kay Wessel and Philippe Herreweghe 1:00£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 9. Aria (SA) "Saget, saget mir geschwinde"Barbara Schlick, Philippe Herreweghe, Collegium Vocale Gent and Kay Wessel 6:11£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 10. Recitativo (B) "Wir sind erfreut"Collegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe0:38£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249: 11. Chorus "Preis und Dank"Collegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe 2:33£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66: 1. Chorus (AB) "Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen"Collegium Vocale Gent, Kay Wessel and Philippe Herreweghe 9:42£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66: 2. Recitativo (B) "Es bricht das Grab"Collegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe0:35£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66: 3. Aria B "Lassen dem Höchstein ein Danklied erschallen"Collegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe 5:58£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66: 4. Recitativo (AT) "Bei Jesu Leben freudig sein"Collegium Vocale Gent, James Taylor, Kay Wessel and Philippe Herreweghe 4:25£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66: 5. Aria (AT) "Ich furchte zwar - Ich furchte nicht"Collegium Vocale Gent, Kay Wessel, James Taylor and Philippe Herreweghe 8:48£0.89  Buy MP3 
Listen17. Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen, BWV 66: 6. Choral "Alleluja! Des solln wir alle froh sein"Collegium Vocale Gent and Philippe Herreweghe0:52£0.89  Buy MP3 


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exquiste Easter Oratorio 16 Sep 2008
By Marcolorenzo TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
The Easter oratorio is a reworking by Bach of cantata BWV 249a written for the birthday of the Duke of Saxony, and reworked again as BWV 249b for the birthday of the Governor of Leipzig. The words of these two secular version are by Picander, and the words of this sacred version are probably by Picander also. The music of these two secular cantatas does not survive but is preserved in this Oratorio, which is here performed in a most sublime way and is actually musically soul regenerating and energizing as befits its subject matter. Herreweghe with Bach never disappoints me and he keeps getting better and better. Exquiste singing by all soloists. The German counter-tenor Kai Wessel (assistant to René Jacobs) is fantastic in the role of Mary Magdelena. The orchestra plays with great fluidity, polish and precision. This disc won a Diapson d'Oro, Choc de le Monde de la Musique and an "ffff" award from Telerama. Is there anything more to say?
The second cantata on the disc is BWV 66 "Erfreut euch ihr Herzen" / "Be Joyful". This is another reworking by Bach of cantata 66a written for the birthday of Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cothen, while the music of BWV 66a is lost the reworked version is preserved in this cantata BWV 66. In the sacred Cantata BWV 66 which is presented here in this recording, the Gospel of Luke (24:13-35) in which Christ appears to two disciples travelling on the road to Emmaus, and in which the hope of the resurrection is treated. The aria between the personifications of Hope (transformation of the character of Happiness from the secular cantata) and Faith (transformed from Fame in the secular version) and sung by Kai Wessel and James Taylor is splendid.
A jewel of a recording.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
By Ralph Moore TOP 50 REVIEWER
Format:Audio CD
Although I am very attached to traditional readings of Bach by the likes of Richter, Gönnenwein, Forster and Scherchen of the kind that make HIPsters break out instantly in hives, I am by no means averse to more recent, scholarly and informed performances as long as they do not exude the rushed, glacial, joyless chill too prevalent amongst the sternest modern practitioners. So it is usually to Herreweghe that I turn when I want to hear the perfect balance between sensitivity to both period practice and the emotional demands of the music - and once again, he comes up trumps here.

Herreweghe's gift is to retain the flexibility to permit the music's frequent dance rhythms to emerge. In this 1994 recording, in first rate sound, he uses his customary small orchestra and choir, the Collegium Vocale, but there is nothing mean or clipped about their sound. Bach had no qualms about recycling secular cantatas for liturgical purposes (although never the other way round) and his music was grounded in dance forms. Although only a "little" oratorio at just over forty minutes, its range is surprising. We have a sprightly Sinfonia, a plaintive Adagio with wonderful solo passages for the oboe and a virtuoso arias for the soprano and the tenor both accompanied by flutes. The "Schlummer" ("sleep") aria is a frequently recurring feature in Bach's idiom, the most famous perhaps being "Schlummert Ein" from BWV 82a "Ich habe genug", and it is here sung sweetly and steadily by tenor James Taylor. Soprano Barbara Schlick is also pure and warm of tone. Countertenor Kai Wessel is impressive in his aria (wrongly designated in the booklet as a duet with the soprano); no squawking or hootiness but agile and very well tuned.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Audio CD
This recording of the Easter Oratorio (BWV 249 - Come, hasten, come running ) lasts about 42 minutes, in marked contrast to Bach's setting of The Passion according to St. Matthew (over two and a half hours) and the St John (over two and a quarter.) Perhaps Bach felt that following the labours of Passiontide the congregation deserved a shorter piece to celebrate the joy of the resurrection.

The Oratorio begins unusually with a Sinfonia followed by an Adagio, joyful and serious by turns, before the first chorus bids us to run joyfully to the cave in which the body of Jesus has been buried, assuring us that the Saviour has awakened. There follows an interchange between Mary Magdalen, Mary the mother of James, Peter and John, in which the two women berate the men for their lack of faith in the resurrection. The two saints are eventually convinced of the truth; the Lord is risen and Hell vanquished. The company of four anticipate their reunion with the Lord joyfully.

The Oratorio is accompanied on this recording, by a further cantata for Eastertide (BWV 66 - Be joyful ye hearts) which at a running time of 31 minutes makes a fine companion piece. It is characterised by a dialogue between the personifications of Hope and Fear, in which Fear is eventually overcome. The final chorale is a triple Alleluia and a single Kyrie. The use of Hope and Fear illustrates a point made in the accompanying notes to the effect that in both this piece and the Easter Oratorio, Bach re-worked material from originally profane compositions, demonstrating perhaps that although undoubtedly a convinced Lutheran (how else could we have stood the good burghers of Leipzig?) he drew no rigid distinction in the music, as opposed to the text set to the music, between sacred and secular forms.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yet another great Bach Oratorio. Kantata, not so great. 18 Oct 2007
By B. Marold - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
This Oster-Oratorium, BWV 249 like Bach's lesser masses, probably gets lost in the rush to his 'Magnificat', 'St. Matthew's Passion', and 'Mass in B-Minor', but this is a great, and nicely concise work. I am especially fond of this rendition in that even with my very rusty German, I can understand the words in most of the solos. I confess that the 'b side' Kantate 'Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen' BWV 66 is not up to the standard of the Oratorio. Some of the arias especially seem a bit harsh, and that's from someone who has no training in serious singing. Still, at 70 plus minutes, this is a great disk, if you can get it at below original list price of about $17.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thoroughly recommendable recording of Bach's "little" oratorio 1 April 2013
By Ralph Moore - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Although I am very attached to traditional readings of Bach by the likes of Richter, Gönnenwein, Forster and Scherchen of the kind that make HIPsters break out instantly in hives, I am by no means averse to more recent, scholarly and informed performances as long as they do not exude the rushed, glacial, joyless chill too prevalent amongst the sternest modern practitioners. So it is usually to Herreweghe that I turn when I want to hear the perfect balance between sensitivity to both period practice and the emotional demands of the music - and once again, he comes up trumps here.

Herreweghe's gift is to retain the flexibility to permit the music's frequent dance rhythms to emerge. In this 1994 recording, in first rate sound, he uses his customary small orchestra and choir, the Collegium Vocale, but there is nothing mean or clipped about their sound. Bach had no qualms about recycling secular cantatas for liturgical purposes (although never the other way round) and his music was grounded in dance forms. Although only a "little" oratorio at just over forty minutes, its range is surprising. We have a sprightly Sinfonia, a plaintive Adagio with wonderful solo passages for the oboe and a virtuoso arias for the soprano and the tenor both accompanied by flutes. The "Schlummer" ("sleep") aria is a frequently recurring feature in Bach's idiom, the most famous perhaps being "Schlummert Ein" from BWV 82a "Ich habe genug", and it is here sung sweetly and steadily by tenor James Taylor. Soprano Barbara Schlick is also pure and warm of tone. Countertenor Kai Wessel is impressive in his aria (wrongly designated in the booklet as a duet with the soprano); no squawking or hootiness but agile and very well tuned. The bass Peter Kooy has less to do here although he comes into his own for the second half of the programme, the sacred cantata "Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen", in which he has his own aria. His voice is nothing special but unobjectionable, even if he is occasionally tempted into aspirating his runs - alwyas a vocal technical no-no.

I don't think BWV 66 is as distinguished as the oratorio but most people will welcome it as an unusual filler. I advise prospective purchases to watch out for bargain import prices on Marketplace. I had no recording of this piece before and I am indebted to the recommendations from previous Amazon reviewers.

The presentation of this disc is especially attractive with a silver and black slipcase adorned with a detail from a Dürer drawing.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!!! 23 Nov 2012
By CineMusic_Art - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
It makes sense to say that every composition by Bach is sublime? I say this too ...
Amazing interpretation of Herreweghe and the whole ensemble. Recording quality excellent.
Highly recommended.
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HIPster Wars - News from the Bach Front - Communiqué 2 8 Mar 2012
By Bernard Michael O'Hanlon - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
His diet-Bruckner notwithstanding, there are many reasons to commend Herreweghe as a practitioner of his craft. He is no period practice Nosferatu. He is alive to poetry and grandeur. His orchestra never sandpapers one's ears. Nor is he infected with greyhound-itis (unlike poor old Jeggy).

This performance of the Easter Oratorio is masterly. Christ is Risen and the jubilation of this cosmic event is unerringly captured in this performance. The singers are uniformly excellent (Barbara Schlick must surely attract bees given the honey in her voice). The recording by Harmonia Mundi is stellar. BWV 66 is a lesser work but interesting all the same. Indeed, the joie de vivre of the first chorale is highly infectious - who said that Lutheranism has to `cold as an iceberg, gloomy and glum. Cold as the hair on a polar bear's . . . .' Calvinism it ain't.

There is one caveat to this disc: contralto out, counter-tenor in.

Now, when Kai Wessel started to ply his trade in BWV 249, I was flabbergasted. How is such a tessitura possible? Is it a `Man in the Iron Underpants' job? Or did someone grab this poor bugger by the `maracas' when he started to sing? I don't know. I do not care to think about it too deeply but it sounds damned unnatural to me. Indeed, anyone who is proud of their manhood cannot countenance such gruesome measures to eke out a higher register. I can only hope the authorities are aware of this tawdry practice and eradicate it forthwith. And what is so wrong with using a contralto unless one wants to underwrite travesties of this ilk?

All in all, this is a great disc even if it will make you wince as a man.
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