Start reading Awakening to the Tao (Shambhala Classics) on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here or start reading now with a free Kindle Reading App.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available
 

Awakening to the Tao (Shambhala Classics) [Kindle Edition]

Liu I-ming , Thomas Cleary
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Print List Price: £9.24
Kindle Price: £6.17 includes VAT* & free wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: £3.07 (33%)
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £6.17  
Paperback £9.12  
Kindle Daily Deal
Kindle Daily Deal: Up to 70% off
Each day we unveil a new book deal at a specially discounted price--for that day only. Learn more about the Kindle Daily Deal or sign up for the Kindle Daily Deal Newsletter to receive free e-mail notifications about each day's deal.

Book Description

The
Tao is the ancient Chinese "Way" that has inspired numerous books,
from
The
Tao of Physics

to
The
Tao of Sex
.
This book might be called "The Tao of Tao." In 142 brief meditative
essays, the author uses simple language and natural imagery to express the
essence of the wisdom that holds the key to success in every human endeavor.

Liu
I-ming (b. 1737) was a Taoist adept and a scholar of Buddhism and Confucianism.
He is the author of commentaries on several Taoist classics that have been
published in English, including
The
Taoist
I Ching
,
also translated by Thomas Cleary.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

Page of Start over
This shopping feature will continue to load items. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut key to navigate to the next or previous heading.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 206 KB
  • Print Length: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications (18 Jun. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159030344X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590303443
  • ASIN: B00DGY0TCG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • : Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #445,707 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a simple book that i go to over and over 18 Jan. 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
like stephen mitchell's translation of the tao te ching, i go to this book when i want inspiration. this is one of the great spiritual books, yet it is simple and a joy to read. it also teaches about the three "treasures" of life: vitality, energy, and spirit, and how to preserve them. i wish i could read more by this 18th century Taoist
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  12 reviews
36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a simple book that i go to over and over 18 Jan. 1999
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
like stephen mitchell's translation of the tao te ching, i go to this book when i want inspiration. this is one of the great spiritual books, yet it is simple and a joy to read. it also teaches about the three "treasures" of life: vitality, energy, and spirit, and how to preserve them. i wish i could read more by this 18th century Taoist
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent work. 20 Aug. 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This short work by Liu I-Ming deserves much praise for its clarity and simplicity. One of the formost figures associated with the Northern School of Complete Reality Taoism, Liu I-Ming brings an honest and pragmatic tone to his myriad reflections on the Tao presented in this slender volume. For the sincere reader at any level of understanding, this selection is an ongoing source of joy and inspiration. Subsequent readings of this book never fail to increase in significance, a testimony to the depth of the writings. Thomas Clearly provides a very readable translation. For the careful and reflective reader, this text will provide considerable satisfaction. Also recommended is the Taoist I-Ching with commentary by Liu I-Ming (also translated by Cleary).
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is the one 17 Dec. 2006
By boston_student - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is the only book of meditations I take off the shelf regularly. The book is divided into two parts: the first 80 pages consist of about 75 "Contemplations," which are longer meditations (0.5-1.5 pages) based on simple observations of the natural and man-made world. The last 20 pages consist of "Refrains of Lament," which are shorter and more pronounced observations about the Tao, what it is, and what it is not. The passages that have had the most relevancy to me encourage me to reflect on social relationships, and help me to feel good relating to other people (or not) while living in a fast-paced, competitive, sometimes un-enlightened culture.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Appears to be an excellent translation of a classic Taoist text. 18 Aug. 2008
By Brother Hamza Philip - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The reason I wrote in the title of this review that the translation "appears to be an excellent translation" is because I don't have enough scholarly knowledge of Taoism (nor of Chinese, for that matter) to be able to pass that kind of judgement. However, I can say truthfully that I was not only able to clearly understand Cleary's translation (and that almost-pun is intended), but I was also able to benefit from reading the translation. Previously, I have read Cleary's translation of the Tao Teh Ching and and the inner chapters of Zhuang Tzu, as well as his translations of selections from the Quran and from Imam Ali Ibn Talib's wisdom sayings from the Peak of Eloquence, which I found to be well translated (in fact, one of the best by a non-Muslim scholar that I have found to date, the other excellent Western translator being William Chittick). I also own Cleary's translations included in "The Taoist I Ching" and "The Secret of the Golden Flower" but want to delve into some of the more basic material on Taoism before tackling these more "advanced" selections.

Lui I-Ming's observations and meditations are just as valid today as they were in the early 19th century when he composed this gem. Some of the observations brought me back to when I was a 7 year-old boy (4 decades ago!) playing in my yard and looking at caterpillars crawling along the bushes in front of the house. A year later, I became interested in Astronomy and bought The Golden Book of Stars and learned about what I saw in the night sky, and how the sky changed with the march of the seasons. As a 7 or 8 year old boy interested in insects and the night sky, with none of the daily concerns that come to one as a responsible adult, it was a very happy time of my life. If the only thing Lui I-Ming's meditiations did was bring back the memories of those times, I would have considered the book worthwhile.

However, several of the meditations seem to be talking about my adult life and how I got to the place where I am right now. One such meditation is the one titled "The Flowers and Fruits of Plants and Trees". When I look at some of the decisions I've made in my life and how those decisions brought me to where I am now, I can't help but think that I am like the Tree that didn't bear fruit one year. One can learn from one's mistakes (hopefully) and return to the proper cycle, but it is better if one realizes there is an cycle and be able to know when one is straying from that cycle.

Again, I have no background in Taoism (with the exception of my own reading of the basic writings of Lao Tzu and Zhuang Tzu and reading about the tri-grams and hexagrams used in the I-Ching), so I can't make a very informed judgement about Thomas Cleary's translations. However, since I have found benefit from reading and reflecting upon Cleary's translations of Taoist literature, I have to conclude that Cleary must be doing something right.
5.0 out of 5 stars Sound Philosophy 3 Jun. 2015
By JVS - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book contains very wise teachings that are useful both at the practical level of everyday life and at the spiritual/philosophical level. Among other things I found it useful to understand philosophical Taoism and to avoid its pitfalls. I read this book for the first time many years ago in my native language derived from this translation and was fascinated by its level of wisdom. I bought it again to read the original English translation and have also been collecting the rest of Liu I-Ming's output that has been translated, thankfully, by Mr. Cleary.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category