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[ [ [ Helix [ HELIX BY Brown, Eric ( Author ) Jun-01-2007[ HELIX [ HELIX BY BROWN, ERIC ( AUTHOR ) JUN-01-2007 ] By Brown, Eric ( Author )Jun-01-2007 Quality Paper Hardcover – 1 Jun 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Solaris (1 Jun. 2007)
  • ASIN: B00DFOJH5M
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Keen Reader TOP 100 REVIEWER on 8 Dec. 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't know all the subgenres and technicalities of science fiction, but I know when I enjoy reading a book, whatever it purports to be, and I enjoyed reading this book. It's a bit like a blend between an armageddon/apocalyptic novel and a sci-fi to me.

The story starts with the imminent demise of Earth as we know it, destroyed by the humans and their industrial wastes etc. Joe Hendry, a disillusioned space engineer, is living a subsistence life on the coast of Australia. His daughter is chosen to take part in a secret mission to take colonists to a new planet to try and start the human race's fight for survival again. Hendry unexpectedly is able to take part in this journey. The set-up is quick in this book, and we are fairly soon into space and heading towards what is hoped to be humankind's salvation, a new planet. But when the ship crashlands, the survivors find something they never expected to find.

Meanwhile, we read of a young dirigible builder and entrepeneur, Ehrin, who is facing battles of his own against the Establishment in the form of a repressive and conservative Church power. Ehrin's dream to find what his father hinted at before his own untimely death leads him into dangerous ground.

The blend of sci-fi and imagination, widely diverse characters and characterisations, landscapes and motivations left me quite happily turning the pages rapidly in this novel; I thoroughly enjoyed it, and I am glad there is scope for further novels; in fact I have purchased Helix Wars on the strength of my enjoyment of this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By 2theD on 8 Aug. 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Eric Brown has had two things going for him: (1) he has penned a large and diverse bibliography with earth- and space-based stories, each as enticing as the next and (2) he has continually introduced stories highlighting characterization. These two broad elements of Brown's writing were prevalent in the first three Brown novels I've read: The Fall of Tartarus (2005), Engineman (1994), and Guardians of the Phoenix (2010). The first hiccup came when I read Brown's newest novel, Weird Space: The Devil's Nebula, which mainly failed because I expected a strong story with a strong cast. Undeterred, I was eager to dig into another Brown novel--Helix, at 526 pages, was begging to be read!

Rear cover synopsis:
"Five hundred years from its launch, the colony vessel Lovelock is deep into its sub-lightspeed journey, carrying four thousand humans in search of a habitable planet. When a series of explosions tear the ship apart, it, it [sic] is forced to land on the nearest possible location: a polar section of the Helix--a vast, spiral construct of worlds, would about a G-type sun.

"While most of the colonists remain in coldsleep, the surviving crew members of the Lovelock must proceed upspiral in search of a habitable section. On their expedition they encounter extraordinary landscapes and alien races, meet with conflict and assistance, and attempt to solve the epic mystery that surrounds the origin of the Helix."

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In 2095, the Earth was under the corruption of the people she housed, a natural extension the people being so corrupt on the personal level that it was inevitably mirrored in society at large (13). Even at the national level, "eighty percent of other European countries...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ben on 10 Dec. 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
*no spoilers in this review*

I picked this up without high expectations, knowing nothing of the author and without reading any reviews. The back cover suggested a human-centered story similar in a way to that of Halo, which didn't inspire me greatly, but I'm glad I made the effort. Any concerns I may have had were quickly gone and the story quickly sucks you in and the balance is much less human centered than the cover suggests. From the outset the story is expertly crafted and features a perfect balance of storytelling from two viewpoints. It's never boring and during the first half in particular there is at times a great sense of adventure and wonder.

Sci-fi can at times be filled with characters with unpronounceable names, pointlessly descriptive terminology, and annoying central characters, but this is not the case here. The writing is very modern and conveys events with admirable skill. If you enjoy the likes of Star Trek and Stargate as I do then I think you will enjoy this. Helix itself would make a very good series.

The anti-church sentiments are reiterated more than required and the last few chapters slightly short, but for the most part all characters are well rounded and you're left wanting to more.

This is a very smooth, enjoyable read and one of my favourite books, I can't wait to pick up more of Eric Brown's work.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Detra Fitch VINE VOICE on 31 May 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In the future, humanity destroys the Earth with their constant wars and by ravaging the land without giving anything back. Earth's end is in site. The European Space Organization (ESO) secretly builds a vast colony ship (named the Lovelock), trains key personnel to crew it, and readies over four thousand coldsleep pods for the humans chosen to begin life anew on another world. Terrorists object to anyone leaving Earth, thus ESO must keep everything as secret as possible. With only minor interference, the Lovelock launches, taking with it the only real hope the human race has for survival.

Five hundred light-years later (one thousand years standard Earth time), Lovelock is torn apart by a series of explosions. A skeleton crew is awakened from coldsleep and they must scramble to save the frozen colonists by crash landing on the nearest possible location: a polar section of a Helix - a vast, spiral construct of worlds, wound about a G-type sun. While most of the colonists remain in coldsleep, the four surviving crew members of the Lovelock proceed up-spiral in search of a habitable section. They will encounter extraordinary and vast landscapes, alien races, and begin unraveling the mystery of who created the helix.

Meanwhile, elsewhere on another tier of the helix, a race resembling lemurs has been under the control of the Church for millennia. The Church is all-powerful and makes all decisions for the people. Ehrin Telsa, owner of Telsa Dirigible Company, mans an expedition of the western plains for usable resources. Of course, the Church sends a representative with them, Elder Cannak.
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