Buy Used
£2.40
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book is in good condition and fulfilled by Amazon. Signs of previous use but spine it tight and book is clean. This book is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Aunts aren't Gentlemen Paperback – 24 Feb 1977


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£127.21 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (24 Feb 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140041923
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140041927
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 1.2 x 18 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 473,942 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

The author of almost a hundred books and the creator of Jeeves, Blandings Castle, Psmith, Ukridge, Uncle Fred and Mr Mulliner, P.G. Wodehouse was born in 1881 and educated at Dulwich College. After two years with the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank he became a full-time writer, contributing to a variety of periodicals including Punch and the Globe. He married in 1914. As well as his novels and short stories, he wrote lyrics for musical comedies with Guy Bolton and Jerome Kern, and at one stage had five musicals running simultaneously on Broadway. His time in Hollywood also provided much source material for fiction. At the age of 93, in the New Year's Honours List of 1975, he received a long-overdue knighthood, only to die on St Valentine's Day some 45 days later.

Product Description

About the Author

PG Wodehouse was born in Guildford, Surrey, in 1881 and educated at Dulwich College. He was created a Knight of the British Empire in 1975 and died on St. Valentine's Day in the same year at the age of ninety-three. His novels are translated into every language and are frequently adapted for radio and television. In Jeeves and Wooster he created two of the best known and best loved characters in twentieth century literature.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Darwi Odrade on 19 Jun 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
but then what else can you say about jeeves and wooster. once again old bertie gets into a sticky situation and jeeves has to worm him out but not before bertie has an unfortunate run in with an ex fiancee, and a rather odd old general who's convinced that bertie is a wanted criminal intent on stealing cats!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Sep 2004
Format: Hardcover
P.G. Wodehouse's best stories are invariably those that involve the butler Jeeves helping the scatterbrained and easy-living Bertie Wooster escape from the fickle hand of fate and his own pranks. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen focuses on Bertie being at the wrong place at the wrong time and being constantly in the soup because of what others do. He valiantly launches forward and needs less help than usual to remain the carefree bachelor about town.
The Cat-nappers starts off innocently enough as Bertie finds himself with disturbing pink spots on his chest. Seeking out a physician's counsel, Bertie gets more than he bargained for when he bumps into Vanessa Cook (who had turned down his marriage proposal the year before) and O.J. (Orlo) Porter (former dorm mate at Oxford who favored left-wing causes) as they lead a protest march that stalls Bertie's car. Porter hops in the car to escape the Bobbies and sells Bertie some life insurance. Porter turns out to be in love with Ms. Cook and is very jealous of anyone who might have an interest in her. At the doctor's office, Bertie runs into Major Plank who had once tried to have Bertie arrested. Fortunately, Plank cannot remember who he is . . . but it's a narrow escape. The doctor tells Bertie the spots will go away, but Bertie's health needs are not being met. He suggests a trip to someplace quiet in the country.
Naturally, Bertie thinks of his Aunt Dahlia and the wonderful meals he always enjoys when he visits her. But she's off visiting elsewhere. She does offer to take a cottage for Bertie so he can visit with her.
Once there, things go badly downhill. Naturally, Bertie does it to himself to some extent. Ignoring Jeeves's advice, he takes a wrong turn and ends up with a nasty scare.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dave Rado on 12 Oct 2008
Format: Paperback
In his earlier Jeeves books, Wodehouse wrote perfect caricatures of the British aristocracy - that is, although exaggerated, one could suspend disbelief and imagine that the characters were real and authentic. However, by the time he wrote "Aunts Aren't Gentlemen", Wodehouse seems to have spent too many years living in the States, and to have forgotten how English people actually speak. The dialog and narrative read as if the characters are Americans rather than English aristocrats, almost every sentence contains at least one word or phrase that no English aristocrat would ever utter, and in addition, the dialog is much less witty than in the earlier books - the sparkle has gone. Very disappointing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In `Aunts Aren't Gentlemen' an out of sorts Bertie retires to We Nook in Maiden Eggesford where his Aunt Dahlia is staying with Jimmy Briscoe whilst Major Plank is staying with Pop Cook. We previously met Major Plank in the company of Uncle Fred at Ashenden Manor in `Uncle Dynamite' and with Wooster and Jeeves in `Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves' when he formed the impression that Bertie was international thief Alpine Joe.

Both Briscoe and Cook have horses running in the Jubilee Stakes with the populous undecided as to which of them will be first to break the tape. Cook's horse, Potato Chip, has formed an attachment to a cat which Bertie is accused of stealing. Further complications arise from Cook's daughter Vanessa breaking her engagement to Orlo Porter and getting Bertie to act as a stand in.

A beautifully crafted if brief farce which although not being amongst the best of the Jeeves and Wooster novels is till a worthy member of the cannon as Jeeves and Wodehouse struggle to reunite boy and girl and horse and cat before Bertie is dragged in front of either a clergyman or a magistrate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Brian W M Painting on 19 Jun 2003
Format: Paperback
With summer about your ears, there are few better things than a large gin and a copy of Aunts aren't gentleman. A plot from the top drawer of farce keeps everything tight and as usual Plum's way with a turn of phrase make for a sheer joy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Sep 2004
Format: Paperback
P.G. Wodehouse's best stories are invariably those that involve the butler Jeeves helping the scatterbrained and easy-living Bertie Wooster escape from the fickle hand of fate and his own pranks. Aunts Aren't Gentlemen focuses on Bertie being at the wrong place at the wrong time and being constantly in the soup because of what others do. He valiantly launches forward and needs less help than usual to remain the carefree bachelor about town.
The Cat-nappers starts off innocently enough as Bertie finds himself with disturbing pink spots on his chest. Seeking out a physician's counsel, Bertie gets more than he bargained for when he bumps into Vanessa Cook (who had turned down his marriage proposal the year before) and O.J. (Orlo) Porter (former dorm mate at Oxford who favored left-wing causes) as they lead a protest march that stalls Bertie's car. Porter hops in the car to escape the Bobbies and sells Bertie some life insurance. Porter turns out to be in love with Ms. Cook and is very jealous of anyone who might have an interest in her. At the doctor's office, Bertie runs into Major Plank who had once tried to have Bertie arrested. Fortunately, Plank cannot remember who he is . . . but it's a narrow escape. The doctor tells Bertie the spots will go away, but Bertie's health needs are not being met. He suggests a trip to someplace quiet in the country.
Naturally, Bertie thinks of his Aunt Dahlia and the wonderful meals he always enjoys when he visits her. But she's off visiting elsewhere. She does offer to take a cottage for Bertie so he can visit with her.
Once there, things go badly downhill. Naturally, Bertie does it to himself to some extent. Ignoring Jeeves's advice, he takes a wrong turn and ends up with a nasty scare.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback