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A Storm of Swords (Part Two) - Blood and Gold: Book 3 of A Song of Ice and Fire Audio Download – Unabridged

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George R.R. Martin's superb and highly acclaimed epic fantasy A Song of Ice and Fire continues with the third in the series A Storm of Swords. There is passion here, and misery and charm, grandeur and squalor, tragedy, nobility and courage. Unabridged and split into two parts. The Seven Kingdoms are divided by revolt and blood feud, and winter approaches like an angry beast. Beyond the Northern borders, wildlings leave their villages to gather in the ice and stone wasteland of the Frostfangs. From there, the renegade Brother Mance Rayder will lead them South towards the Wall.

The men of the Night's Watch are ready for the coming of a great cold and the walking corpses that travel with it. But now they face a horde of wildlings twenty-thousand strong - hungry savage people steeped in the dark magic of the haunted wilderness - poised to invade the Kingdom of the North where Robb Stark wears his new-forged crown. But Robb's defences are ranged against attack from the South, the land of House Stark's enemies the Lannisters. His sisters are trapped there, dead or likely yet to die, at the whim of the Lannister boy-king Joffrey or his depraved mother Cersei, regent of the Iron Throne. Cersei's ambition is unfettered while the dwarf Tyrion Lannister fights for his life, a victim of treachery. And on the other side of the ocean, the last of the Targaryens rears the dragons she hatched from her husband's funeral pyre. Daenerys Stormborn will return to the land of her birth to avenge the murder of her father, the last Dragon King on the Iron Throne.

©2011 George R. R. Martin (P)2011 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 23 hours and 34 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited
  • Release Date: 12 July 2011
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005CW88TQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Richard Johnston on 13 Feb. 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is the best in the series by far. I read the first in the series of George Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' and I was blown away by it. So much so I wrote a review here on Amazon to exult it to those considering buying it. I have now read Book 1, 2, 3 part 1 and this book, A Storm of Swords: Blood and Gold, Book 3 Part 2. I was let down by book 2 and 3 part 1, they were good but not great and if I tried to write a review I could not because the plot all amalgamated into a fuzzy series of events that I think should have been shortened down. However this book makes up for the previous 2 completely. It is a fantastic read and truly insomnia-inflicting! I could not put this book down virtually till I finished it. There are more twists and turns in this book than any of the previous. Events that were dragged out in the previous two are teetered over the edge and thrown off into a thundering development that you cannot help but get swept up in. Remarkably characters that were evil redeem themselves, characters that were good frustrate and annoy the reader.

Martin's use of the written language makes him a master at his craft and can slow or pick up the pace at will and completely manipulate your emotions. If you are reading this review then I presume that you have read at least the first one in the series 'A game of Thrones' therefore I wont summarise the plot incase I ruin it for anyone.

If by book 3 part 1 your getting a little stuck in the mud from the length of the story and the lack of significant movement then please read on because it is worth it to reach this far.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Mar. 2015
Format: Paperback
I must admit that I am loving this series of books, which becomes quite addictive once you start. I am not really that much into fantasy as such but this series leans towards a more historical bent. With Westeros, or the Seven Kingdoms at loggerheads as war rips through the land, there is also a threat from the far North, with those from beyond the Wall, as well as Daenerys Stormborn over the sea.

As Daenerys starts to conquer she has her heart set on regaining the Iron Throne and ruling Westeros, where her family once reigned. With trouble in the North the wildlings want access to Westeros as the undead walk in their lands. Already leading a sortie in the last novel it now becomes a full on attack on the main entrance through the Wall as the wildlings become desperate to get away from the evil.

If this was not enough though, Westeros is still not fully settled from war and as some still fight it has become a time for many to start making alliances and consolidate power, with an eye to the future. And there are many surprises and occurrences in this particular novel. George R R Martin never shies away from killing a main character when it become necessary which is all to the good, as it mirrors real life.

Reading more like historical fiction about the past in Europe this and the other books in this series so far make riveting reading and are vastly enjoyable. As we flip between different characters and locations we never really know what will happen next. We can make assumptions about this or that occurring next, but then Martin comes up with a surprise by altering things with characters dying, or situations changing. In all this is a really good series to curl up with and escape into.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Damon Williams on 4 Oct. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The plot ever thickens!! This has got to be the most exciting and heartbreaking book so far, but despite everything that happens, you are compelled to read on! Also, don't skip the epilogue! Has to be one of the biggest twists yet!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jim J-R on 30 July 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book three and a half of A Song of Ice and Fire is really the second half of the third book, but I've read it a few months after finishing the first half, and thought it worked well on its own, being a length that felt more manageable to read in one go.

This is a really action packed episode in the story, full of unexpected twists and events that really shake up the ongoing storyline. I love how unpredictable the plot can be and how Martin can play with my perceptions of each character throughout.

I found my criticisms of earlier novels in the series swept away - the pacing was perfect, the points of view more at good intervals, and there was never a moment that I didn't want to dive straight into the next chapter.

This is probably my favourite entry in the series so far - it brings a lot of character and plot, and if the following novels are this good, I'm really looking forward to reading them.
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66 of 78 people found the following review helpful By A. Whitehead TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 25 Jan. 2010
Format: Paperback
The Battle of the Blackwater has radically shifted the balance of power in the War of the Five Kings. The Lannisters and Tyrells are now allied together, granting the boy-king Joffrey a vast army against which it appears that Robb Stark, the King in the North, and his allies cannot stand. In the distant lands beyond the Wall, Jon Snow has infiltrated the wildlings to learn more about their plans and objectives, but finds his loyalties torn when he learns that even the free folk have their own codes of honour. And, far beyond the eastern seas, Daenerys Targaryen attempts to hire an army of warriors to her cause from the stinking cities of Slaver's Bay, and decides to bring justice and freedom to these lands, despite it delaying her return home to Westeros.

A Storm of Swords is both the third volume of A Song of Ice and Fire and, individually, the finest work of epic fantasy published since at least The Silmarillion in 1977. George R.R. Martin's writing skills in the first book were good, better in the second and hit impressive new heights here in the third, with growing layers of description and writing giving the Seven Kingdoms more colour and more depth with each passing volume. The characterisation remains strong, and in A Storm of Swords Martin delivers one of his masterstrokes by upgrading the hitherto villainous and reprehensible Jaime Lannister to full POV status. By taking us into the head of one of the 'bad guys' and showing us what makes him tick without descending into cliche (Jaime is still a dangerous and somewhat unpleasant character), Martin achieves some very fine character description and growth.

Elsewhere, Swords gives us some of the most out-and-out memorable moments in fantasy fiction in a long time.
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