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The Attenbury Emeralds Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged

112 customer reviews

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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: BBC Audiobooks Ltd; Unabridged edition (16 Sept. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1408467747
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408467749
  • Product Dimensions: 13.9 x 2.4 x 13.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 564,124 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Sayers's fans won't be disappointed, and newcomers are in for a treat (Laura Wilson, Guardian)

Sayers would not have recognised that it wasn't her own work. (Marcel Berlins, The Times)

A great deal of fun. (Natasha Cooper TLS)

An absolute treat: civilised, intelligent and spellbinding. . . (Barry Forshaw, Daily Express)

A pitch-perfect Golden Age mystery; not a pastiche but a gem of a period puzzle that belongs on the shelf beside the Wimsey originals. (Christopher Fowler, Financial Times)

An enjoyable and clever concoction . . . a good puzzle . . . skilled portrait of the austere postwar world. (Jessica Mann, Literary Review)

Paton Walsh's book conjurs up a sense of time and place wonderfully well and deals with more than just the central story, giving us a clear picture of life after the war, how the lives of the characters have been affected by it, and also showing subtly and powerfully the relationship between master and servant . . . A crime puzzle with deeper layers which makes for an entertaining and satisfying read. (Historical Novels Review) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The long-awaited new Lord Peter Wimsey novel, telling the story of his first case - and his last . . .

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By kindlegirl on 29 May 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was sheer dogged determinedness and my love of the original Wimsey books which got me to the end of this book. The story itself is incredibly weak and lacks any form of suspense or intrigue; instead it meanders its way (slowly and without real direction) to a conclusion. The characters of Peter, Harriet, Bunter and the Dowager are very forced and insipid copies of the originals as portrayed by Sayers; Peter especially comes across as being quite weak and ineffectual and also somewhat pompous at times.There is no real spark or believability in the characters interaction with one another or with the story of events.

Another big disappointment for me in the book is JPWs use of swearing, something Sayers never used in her books, it has been used in a purely gratuitous sense and adds nothing in the way of impact or definition of the narrative; it merely creates a discordant note and adds to the forced feeling of the dialogue and characters.

The only reason I have given this book two stars is because of my abiding love of the original books and I can't sully Sayers memory by only giving it one star! Overall such a disappointing read, if you are a true fan of Sayers, Wimsey and Harriet then give this one a miss.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By sophiesticate on 1 Jan. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a DLS fan I was delighted to come across this book. I had read Presumption of Death and Thrones and Denominations and found them reasonably faithful to the DLS style. however I found the Attenbury Emeralds very disappointing. The complex dynamics and intense relationships between the characters were missing and the plot was torturous and uninspiring in my opinion.

Having read and reread with great pleasure the trials and tribulations of Peter and Harriet, the relationship between Bunter and the couple, the wit, humour and intellect shown by all the major characters as presented by DLS, I was very disappointed by the cardboard characters and dull dialogue found in this book.

I would have expected Peter Wimsey to make much more of inheriting the Dukedom with the roles and responsibilities surrounding it, than the few lines given up to it in the book. It can be argued that this was incidental to the plot, however as Peter Wimsey, written by DLS, was an extremely complex character who took his responsibilities very seriously I suspect that she would have made more of this development, building it into all the characters.

I hope this will be the last attempt to continue this saga. DLS exhibits a light touch and the ability to give these well
loved characters a dimension which allows them to leap off the page into the readers imagination, unfortunately I think that is missing in this book.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Cat on 27 May 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed Thrones, Dominations and although I found 'A Presumption of Death' not quite up to the same standard I was looking forward to this book. However it is nowhere up to the original Dorothy L Sayers standard. The first third is hard going, and has an artificial, forced air. The style of writing a 3-way conversation is clumsy (although I can see why it appealed to the author) and the Wimseys / Bunter have been crystallised in their 1930s characters - I'm sure Peter and Harriet would have moved on and their relationship evolved after the war and nearly 20 years of marriage. Unlike in the original Sayers' writings, these characters fail to come across as 'real' people; to DLS, Peter was a real person and she had obviously known a Bunter, but their relationship is stilted in this book. The plot is just about works, but there are several errors and internal inconsistencies. For example, it is clear in 'Whose Body' that Peter has known Charles Parker for some time: "the feeling of Parker's old trench coat beneath your fingers was comforting. You had felt it in worse places" certainly suggests that Peter had been with Parker during the war and did not first meet him in 1921. There are also inconsistencies about who had the emerald out of the bank and for how long. Finally there is a throwaway line towards the end about the original (Tudor) Wimsey jewels - I kept waiting for them to appear again but the author appears to have lost her own thread at that point (or they were cut out in a re-write) - a pity as they are an intruiging possible thread). The final third of the book is much better and there are flashes of the real Peter and the story is stronger. I rather hope that this is the final Peter Wimsey novel and that the character created by Dorothy L Sayers doesn't become further diluted.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Austin on 24 Mar. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you enjoy detective stories you may like this. If you are reading it as a fan of D.L.Sayers and the Wimsey, Harriet, Bunter triangle then it may disapoint. I didn't find plot interesting enough, the characters seemed too similar to each other and there was very little about Harriet and Peter's (let alone Bunter and Mrs. Bunter's) inner lives. In the DLS books the characters had there own lives and as much in love as Harriet and Peter were ,there were always differences in the way they spoke, thought and acted. In comparison these characters seem like cardboard cut-outs. If you lifted some dialogue out of the page I suspect you'd find it difficult to work out who was talking. Lord Peter has gone very soft and pc in his old age, made me feel quite nauseated. Without spoiling anything there were a few obvious loose ends left hanging. I was disapointed. This is not even close to 'Thrones and Dominations' which was a good read. After this one I may stick to the original stories, there's no point hanging on for more news about H&P if you don't recognise them.
However it's not a bad story and I was interested to find out what happened. But I do miss Harriet and
Peter :-(
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