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Atom Heart Mother [Vinyl LP]

101 customer reviews

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In the early 1960s, a bunch of boys from Cambridge began jamming together, and out of those encounters were born the early incarnations of Pink Floyd. More than 40 years and 150 million album sales later, the band headlined the biggest global music event in history – Live 8 – and was inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame. You could say the Floyd has staying power.

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B00008ETL7
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (101 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Lord Percival Lesmond Bovis III on 18 May 2007
Format: Audio CD
I think that people judge this album a little too harshly in general. There are some interesting ideas on here and some rather lovely "proper" songs . It is very different from the later output so at the risk of offending anyone, it's not for the mullet and denim jacket floyd brigade in general, but I personally love it. Equal parts playful (Alan's pscyhedelic Breakfast) and lush (fat old sun) it serves as something of a curio in it's disjointed layout. Famously the band themselves have dismissed it as rubbish, but perhaps that has more to do with the fact that they are now in their 60's and, like anyone of advancing years, may be slightly embarrased about their more adventurous youthful experimentation. It is also David Gilmour's first really overt contribution to the Floyd sound. I can quite happily listen to this album from beginning to end which is not something you can say about many albums being churned out at the moment, and fat old sun never fails to put a smile on my face. In a word....interesting. Suck it and see.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Martin "Zing Hao" on 7 Jun. 2009
Format: Audio CD
It may seem unapproachable at first. Listen to it only a second time and you realise that "Atom Heart Mother" certainly has some of the most unique moments in the Floyd's history. The title track is a collaboration with Scottish composer Ron Geesin. It is a piece of beauty, 24 minutes long, experimental albeit its distinctive main theme, incorporating an orchestral brass section and a choir, a bit of a secret masterpiece that never really made it, perhaps because it's not "Just Floyd".

The original B-side is dominated by 3 solo compositions of Waters, Wright and Gilmour. Despite the fact that all three are some of their stronger ones, Richard Wright is the undisputed winner with "Summer 68", perhaps one of the best Floyd compositions ever. Waters' "If" seems like an early template for "Good Bye Cruel World", and Gilmour's "Fat Old Sun" is a lovely, rather sweet tune with his favourite pedal steels. Both, Waters' and Gilmour's tunes have become regulars in their later solo shows.

The album closes with Roadie Alan's "Psychedelic Breakfast" which might have been considered ground breaking in 1970, but these days is at best a piece for the rock museum. The sounds of a geezer frying eggs and praising marmalade just don't do it after sampling of random sounds has become an art in its own right.

Despite its unnecessary finale the "Cow Album" is a great one. It is often forgotten in the praise for classic Floyd albums although it is absolutely awe inspiring, very Floyd in the 70s, and ultimately Abbey Road.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Dudley Serious VINE VOICE on 1 Oct. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Some may have still lamented the loss of Syd Barrett at this stage of Floyd's career but Atom Heart Mother (AHM) represented a significant departure from the psychedelic rock of early Floyd towards the moonlit majesty of their 'seventies heyday. Themes and signatures appear that would appear in later albums. Travelling between rocky, funky, folky, orchestral, abstract, AHM set the template for the Floyd of the future. Gorgeous as it was, the original (I mean vinyl) release suffered from a slightly deflated production, so that when for example the choir flooded in, it was more of a ripple than the wave intended. This brush-up maintains the integrity of the original plus the tidal wave we always wanted (but didn't know at the time). One might say Pink Floyd came of age with AHM. Now it has a fully realised production to match its innate quality and musical ambition. And the lovely moo-cows on the sleeve remain in full effect. Enjoy this early classic.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Simon T. on 20 Dec. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Atom Heart Mother for me is a real curio amongst the Floyd back catalogue, and is one of those albums that, although far from perfect, is amazingly rich and varied and I still play it fairly regularly. From the sprawling title track (containing one of Gilmours finest guitar solo's) to the mellow but sinister 'If' ('please don't put your wires in my brain..') the gorgeous 'Fat Old Sun' and the franky bizarre 'Alans Psychedelic Breakfast'. This is an album that newcomers to Pink Floyd should approach with caution, but with perseverance you will be richly rewarded.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Guardian TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 May 2011
Format: Audio CD
AHM is a true original which breaks all the rules and represents Floyd at their quirkiest and most inventive. It's possibly Floyd's most enduring pre-DSOTM collection with a character all its own. The original vinyl album had a similar structure to its follow-on, `Meddle:' one side devoted to a long symphonic concept moving seamlessly through several sections (i.e. `Echoes' on `Meddle'), and the other side a collection of songs which stand well in their own right.

The 24-minute symphonic title track owes a great deal to Kent-based avant-garde composer Ron Geesin, who at the request of Roger Waters conceived and arranged all the brass, orchestral and choral parts at the centre of the piece. Waters and Mason underpin the main theme with a slow-tempo rhythm over which Geesin's brass section lays its cowboy-western theme. The piece then moves seamlessly through several movements including a truly sublime choral section and a short funky jam from the band to return, symphonic style, to the main theme in conclusion. The whole works better than it should, and is all the more remarkable for its time in having virtually no lyrics (the choir is simply used as an instrument for sound). The result is a unique listening experience and in a way beautiful, with fine contributions from Wright and Gilmour, demonstrating here for the first time he was by now a vital member of the band with a great and maturing creative talent. A comparison with `Echoes' recorded only months later is instructive in demonstrating the evolution of ideas which led to some of Floyd's greatest musical innovations in the 1970s, when the band functioned as a productive unit working together.
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