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The Atheist's Bible Companion to the New Testament: A Comprehensive Guide to Christian Bible Contradictions [Paperback]

Mike Davis
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Book Description

30 Oct 2009
There is no other Bible commentary like The Atheist's Bible Companion to the New Testament. It is the only comprehensive reference guide to contradictions in the Christian scriptures, and will appeal to the growing number of religious skeptics who want to shore up their debating arsenal against the Christian fundamentalists.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Outskirts Press (30 Oct 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1432748645
  • ISBN-13: 978-1432748647
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,340,955 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good companions 25 Nov 2010
By Hande Z
There are innumerable Bible companions but this is one of the rare alternative companions because it leads the reader to question conventional and theological interpretations of biblical verses. This is a verse by verse commentary of the New Testament and is an apt companion not only to the New Testament itself but also the author's previous book, "The Atheist's Introduction to the New Testament". As the previous reviewer had pointed out, this book discusses the direct inconsistencies and contradictions in the New Testament as well as raising awkward questions for the Christian apologist. Some of the contradictions might be considered minor and could possibly be "explained" by clever arguments, but some are outright problems for the believer. For example, Davis referred to Luke 20:41 in which Jesus said: "How can they say that Christ is the son of David?" This contradicted the Christian belief that Christ fulfilled the ancient Jewish prophecy that the Messiah will come from the line of David, a claim that Matthew and Luke tried to support by tracing Joseph's lineage to David. It contradicted the claim by Paul in Romans 1:3 Concerning His Son Jesus Christ our Lord who was born from the seed of David according to the flesh." The reader will require a copy of the New Testament at hand to see that the commentaries are to the point. The length of the book did not, sadly, permit the author to set the biblical phrases in full.
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
67 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Will become a standard 8 Nov 2009
By makrothen - Published on Amazon.com
This book will surely become the standard reference for Christian Bible contradictions. As far as I can tell, no other book comes close to listing as many contradictions as this one does. It is presented in the format of a traditional Bible commentary, going through the entire New Testament by chapter and book, resulting in over 450 pages of critical commentary that will provide many new insights to the skeptical as well as the faithful reader. The commentary format is a novel and effective method for presenting Bible contradictions. It works because there are so many contradictions, inaccuracies, and misinterpretations in the NT that nearly every chapter has several to expose. Although the focus is on the New Testament, many Old Testament passages are cited as well, when they conflict with the writings of the New Testament authors.
In addition to the many contradictions, there are numerous examples of what I would call awkward juxtapositions, i.e., Bible verses which do not actually contradict each other, but when considered together create theological difficulties for the Christians. To cite one example: in Matthew 10:33 Jesus says that anyone who denies him before men will be denied by him before God. But Peter denied Jesus three times (Matthew 26:75), so will Peter be denied entrance into heaven? This is not exactly a contradiction, but certainly raises a difficult question for Christians to answer. There are many such examples throughout the book, highlighting a connection between verses that might otherwise be overlooked in a casual reading.
Mike Davis has now written two books on Christian Bible contradictions, so which one should you get? If you are looking for a brief introduction, arranged by theological topic, then his first book, The Atheist's Introduction to the New Testament: How the Bible Undermines the Basic Teachings of Christianity, is your choice. If you want an exhaustive reference organized by chapter and verse, then The Atheist's Bible Companion to the New Testament is what you want. Many Bible critics will find a place for both of these provocative and revealing books on their shelf.
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alternative Companion 10 Mar 2010
By Hande Z - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
There are innumerable Bible companions but this is one of the rare alternative companions because it leads the reader to question conventional and theological interpretations of biblical verses. This is a verse by verse commentary of the New Testament and is an apt companion not only to the New Testament itself but also the author's previous book, "The Atheist's Introduction to the New Testament". As the previous reviewer had pointed out, this book discusses the direct inconsistencies and contradictions in the New Testament as well as raising awkward questions for the Christian apologist. Some of the contradictions might be considered minor and could possibly be "explained" by clever arguments, but some are outright problems for the believer. For example, Davis referred to Luke 20:41 in which Jesus said: "How can they say that Christ is the son of David?" This contradicted the Christian belief that Christ fulfilled the ancient Jewish prophecy that the Messiah will come from the line of David, a claim that Matthew and Luke tried to support by tracing Joseph's lineage to David. It contradicted the claim by Paul in Romans 1:3 Concerning His Son Jesus Christ our Lord who was born from the seed of David according to the flesh." The reader will require a copy of the New Testament at hand to see that the commentaries are to the point. The length of the book did not, sadly, permit the author to set the biblical phrases in full.
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An invaluable reference. 15 July 2010
By C. K. G. - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I have read enough books as of late to fill a bookshelf with diatribes and tomes against religion and I agree with many points made in these books. I thought everything had already been said; however, when I came across Mike Davis' new work, The Atheist's Bible Companion to the New Testament, I could not pass it up. I read his previous book, The Atheist's Introduction to the New Testament: How the Bible Undermines the Basic Teachings of Christianity, and I hope this new work would elaborate more on the contents of the latter. I was not disappointed. Put simply, the book goes through each chapter of the New Testament finding contradiction after contradiction. It is not an anti-religious diatribe, but a point-by-point reference that would be exceedingly handy at any time the NT needs to be challenged. (JWs at the door for example) Sadly, I think that many people will not pick up the book because of the word "Atheist" in the title, but this should not dissuade anyone who wants to learn what Atheists are saying about the Bible, or more accurately, what the bible says about itself. If the Bible says what it says, and it means what it says, then it is an extremely flawed and confused book. It is no wonder that an entire field (Apologetics) was created to defend it from attacks. If you need a book or two to refute the New Testament, buy this book and John W. Loftus' Why I Became an Atheist: A Former Preacher Rejects Christianity Those two books, along with a thorough reading of the Bible are all you need.

CKG
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Should rename book to include more people 17 May 2011
By Hedley Lamarr - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Very Very good book. If you believe word for word in the bible, or only believe parts, or none at all, this is a excellent book to have. If you believe word for word, you need to know what those who dispute the bible are saying. I'm not going to get into a discussion about religion, but being of faith or not, you can take a lot from this book. Though I have read the bible, this gives the other side, and I also learned quite a bit from things I did not remember reading. 4 stars because I think in order to sale more books, he should call it agnostic, deist, atheist and huminist companion..... or something to that nature. I am not an atheist, and almost did not buy the book because of the name of the book, but really the book would follow several groups of people, and not just atheist - He can name the book whatever, all I am saying is that it is a very good book, but the name will hender sales and it doesn't need to. Another reason 4 stars. Some of the stuff he says, and then I look it up in the Bible is not really on the mark, and the Bible is not saying any such thing. Usually- at least 80% of the time I personally think he is on the money, but sometimes he really is a little misleading. All in all a book for all thouse that are pro and con Holy Bible.
7 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars But what do the contradictions hide behind their back? 26 May 2010
By Chris Albert Wells - Published on Amazon.com
Davis, having gone through an exhaustive survey on NT contradictions, has produced a reference book for scholars and an eye-opener for the skeptical inquirer.
But what comes next?
The question is a reminder that Old Testament scholars also hunted for contradictions, inconsistencies and double stories. The results suggested that Genesis, Exodus and the conquest of the Promised Land were essentially legendary. The rationale behind the texts remained obscure until archaeology provided a completely revised and logic story (see the Bible Unearthed by Finkelstein and Silberman) far away from the original habits of thought.
Accumulating NT contradictions is likewise the first step in preparing minds to consider that the narratives are telling us something very different to what is usually promoted by tenants of historicity. Davis can be admired for his resolute dedication to his cause. Readers will consult his book and be amazed or amused by the inconsistencies within the canonical texts. Doubting or invalidating the conventional reading is however only a preliminary phase. Even if the NT should not be read at face value, they were however saying important things to those who wrote them. It is still legitimate to ask what the real intentions of the earliest Gospel writers were. As with the OT, we can expect that the innumerable NT contradictions are hiding behind their back the real meaning of the Jesus story and that the resulting Jesus will probably be just as alien to church readings as the revised OT narratives are to synagogue traditions.
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