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Atem


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Frequently Bought Together

Atem + Alpha Centauri + Zeit (Expanded Edition)
Price For All Three: £50.31

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Product details

  • Audio CD (26 Feb. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sanctuary
  • ASIN: B000063IQP
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 101,615 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Atem20:27Album Only
Listen  2. Fauni Gena10:47Album Only
Listen  3. Circulation of Events 5:52£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Wahn 4:38£0.99  Buy MP3 

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Steve Benner TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 27 Jan. 2003
Format: Audio CD
"Atem" was Tangerine Dream's fourth album, released in 1973. In many ways, it marks the group's furthest departure from the world of rock and pop and the closest they ever came to the sound world of the classical avant garde. It is interesting to note that, for the first time, no guest musicians are credited, suggesting that the group of Edgar Froese, Chris Franke and Peter Baumann was settling down to working together and becoming more confident of their sound world.
The opening title track, 'Atem' (the German word for 'breath') clearly builds upon earlier TD material, like 'Alpha Centauri' and 'Zeit', being similar both in scale - it is over 20 minutes long - and style. In many ways, it is an updating of "Electronic Meditation", with Chris Franke's tom-tom drumming providing the main impetus over mostly organ and synth sounds in its early parts, and for its almost organic overtones. Present for the first time, though, is the distinctive sound of the mellotron, which was to become so much a Tangerine Dream trademark throughout the mid- to late-70s. 'Atem' is a beautifully structured work and has an exquisite central section, with a quiet heartbeat pattern played on tom toms, over an eerie mellotron loop and some beautifully textured patterns of white noise and, later, throbbing VCS3 sounds. At this point, TD comes close to the sound world of the electroacoustic musicians, especially of the French Canadian acousmatic school.
The next track, 'Fauni-Gena' is another largish work (almost 11 mins) which continues in a similar vein.
Read more ›
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By DSR VINE VOICE on 20 Oct. 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I didn't discover this album until well after I first heard their follow-up "Phaedra", so can't give a fair answer as to whether this would have blown my mind the same way. Despite this, there are some wonderfully moving sounds here, composed with much imagination, showing what the band could do just before the "sequencer" era took over.

The previous reviewer got it spot on. The title track starts heavy, climaxes and then goes into a gentle, but very varied soundscape, drawing the listener in to get lost in its vistas. The section starting at around the ten minute mark still sends shivers down my spine, as does the "helicopter" section at the end...

The last track, "Wahn", is the one I keep going back to. It starts with almost primitive voice shouts and screams bathed in effects and very beefy percussion which then gradually calms down, finishing the album all too soon.

The remastering for this version is really good too, sounding more like the early LP's to me than the rather muffled (in my opinion) Jive CD release I also own. There's a freshness and inner clarity here that adds to ones enjoyment and shows what modern (re)mastering can do. I'm glad that the hiss hasn't been got rid of either, as attempts to do this can spoil the sound.

A Sincerely recommended "transitional" album from TD's classic line up.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 7 Dec. 1999
Format: Audio CD
"Atem" was Tangerine Dream's fourth album, released in 1973. In many ways, it marks the group's furthest departure from the world of rock and pop and the closest they ever came to the sound world of the classical avant garde. It is interesting to note that, for the first time, no guest musicians are credited, suggesting that the group of Edgar Froese, Chris Franke and Peter Baumann was settling down to working together and becoming more confident of their sound world.
The opening title track, 'Atem' (the German word for 'breath') clearly builds upon earlier TD material, like 'Alpha Centauri' and 'Zeit', being similar both in scale-it is over 20 minutes long-and style. In many ways, it is an updating of "Electronic Meditation", with Chris Franke's tom-tom drumming providing the main impetus over mostly organ and synth sounds in its early parts, and for its almost organic overtones. Present for the first time, though, is the distinctive sound of the mellotron, which was to become so much a Tangerine Dream trademark throughout the mid- to late-70s. 'Atem' is a beautifully structured work and has an exquisite central section, with a quiet heartbeat pattern played on tom toms, over an eerie mellotron loop and some beautifully textured patterns of white noise and, later, throbbing VCS3 sounds. At this point, TD comes close to the sound world of the electroacoustic musicians, especially of the French Canadian acousmatic school.
The next track, 'Fauni-Gena' is another largish work (almost 11 mins) which continues in a similar vein.
Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD
'Atem' certainly could be seen as the band taking an entirely new direction, 'Zeit' definitely being a turning point in the band's discography and style. They lost none of the percussiveness as heard on Alpha Centauri (conclusion of Fly and Collision of Comus Sola) but took the long dream-like sequences of Zeit and developed them, without losing any of the sense of unease and other-worldliness that had been evident so far. The title track, with its almost grandiose opening, is a joy to listen to; the intensity finally giving way to pacifying and yet somewhat unnerving melodies, which constantly change and develop as the music shifts along. It is never boring, as one never quite knows just what is around the corner. 'Fauni gena' is arguably the closest thing on the album to the title track of Phaedra, in that one can begin to pick out shifting electronic rhythms emerging out of the other-worldliness that was previously mentioned in this review. 'Circulation of Events', about half the length of the previous track, is soothing enough, though never quite makes it. It simply drifts, but doesn't actually go anywhere. Finally, 'Wahn' lifts us out of our reverie, due to some almost Stockhausen-like voice tuning bursting in on the scene, and Froese's mellotron taking up the main melody. On the whole a most satisfying album, and one which I think takes us down more avenues than we would otherwise think. Recommended.
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