Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£12.54
& FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

At The Deer Head Inn Original recording reissued


Price: £12.64 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
29 new from £6.57 4 used from £5.51

Amazon Artist Stores

All the music, full streaming songs, photos, videos, biographies, discussions, and more.
.

Frequently Bought Together

At The Deer Head Inn + Always Let Me Go: Live In Tokyo + Inside Out
Price For All Three: £45.87

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (19 Dec. 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued
  • Label: ECM
  • ASIN: B000024D2E
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 227,279 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Solar
2. Basin Street Blues
3. Chandra
4. You Don't Know What Love Is
5. You And The Night And The Music
6. Bye Bye Blackbird
7. It's Easy To Remember

Product Description

Product Description

Part of the ECM masterpiece collection. Comes in a SHM-CD format. Limited edition.

Amazon.co.uk

A couple of the reasons this session of standards stands out amid Keith Jarrett's multiple standards sessions in the 1980s and 90s are the modest nightclub setting and the fact that Paul Motian subs for usual trio drummer Jack DeJohnette. The setting is relaxed and homey, with the improvisations holding a warmth that denotes unparalleled comfort for the trio, perhaps because the venue holds personal charm for Jarrett, who played piano at the Deer Head Inn as a teen. He spaces his phrasing exquisitely, tingeing phrases with just the right shades, as Motian takes a much more recessive rhythmic role than DeJohnette's usual fare. The result is curiously strong, with implied rhythms speaking far louder than some of Jarrett's more overt rhythmic pushes elsewhere. Among many highlights, this set peaks with a nod to the late Jaki Byard on his tune "Chandra". This is a sonically and musically stellar achievement. --Andrew Bartlett

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck TOP 500 REVIEWER on 22 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
If this is Jarrett producing "tough, dense, forbidding music" then I must have a different CD. The truth is quite the opposite. Jarretts performance here is as close as you'll ever get to hearing Jarrett playing just for fun.

A bluesy version of Basin Street Blues, that is still embued with Jarretts distinctive touch and phrasing.

Bye Bye Blackird is a wonderful performance, that I have listened to over and over.

This album was supposed to be a documentary recording only, and wasn't originally planned for release, but as Jarrett says in the sleeve notes "I think that you can hear on this tape, what jazz is all about".

It is a little different from the standards trio, but thats because its a different drummer. But the drummer is Paul Motian who played with Monk, Bill Evans and a multitude of other Jazz giants!

Jarrett has produced some "forbidding music" in his time, but I can assure you its not this album. Strongly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Vapallia on 11 Jun. 2010
Format: Audio CD
From the opening few bars of the first track, Solar, the mood is set.

Jarrett agreed to go back to this Inn because it holds many good memories from his youth. His very early days as a jazz musician playing whatever instrument was required, just so that he could be part of the band on this stage.

With this return he clearly set out to have fun. As a musician at the pinnacle of his career and regularly playing the largest concert halls and opera houses around the globe, being back 'home' in the local pub must have felt like a night off. He appears very much at home with his two old buddies, sparring, laughing, trying to catch each other out with surprise changes in time and harmony. It's so playful and light. There's a strong sense that this is a gig without the usual pressures that must come with the big shows, or the intense stresses that come with a solo improvisational concert. Yet it's still very searching, fresh, energetic, beautiful, swinging, surprising and very rewarding.

I have all of Jarrett's standards trio albums. This is for sure one of the best and more interesting. Interesting not only because the line-up is slightly changed and the overall sound is somewhat different to the usual big hall acoustics (this is very intimate and warm). I think it's because of the way that Jarrett must have been feeling that night. He really enjoyed this show, the space, the evening, his friends, a couple of drinks, and the memories.

The closing tune is, rather poetically, 'It's easy to remember'. It is exquisitely beautiful. Like a love-felt letter to a dear old friend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Alice Cribbins on 19 Sept. 2005
Format: Audio CD
Live at The Deer Head Inn is widely regarded among my Jarrett freak friends as a well-below par outing of tough, dense, almost forbidding music. Without regular JDJ, the trio balance seems knocked out of kilter - the result is an uncomfortable listening experience. Jarrett's work here lacks his normal wonderful melodic fluency and expressiveness. This may make the music more attractive for some listeners, but not for my peer group.
More disappointing is the work of the official Amazon reviewer here, who seems to revel in pointlesly opaque jazz jargon: "recessive" drumming; the pianist "tingeing shades"? These phrases tell the reader nothing about the music, but reveal a writer struggling with a lack of self-esteem (causing him to reach for the worse clichés of jazz journalism down the ages) or simply suffering from an unfortunate tendency to pretentiousness.
Craig W Thomas
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Great Fun 18 Mar. 2007
By S J Buck - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Just to clear this up. Paul Motian is on drums and there is no track called flying part 1. Jarretts performance here is as close as you'll ever get to hearing Jarrett playing just for fun. A bluesy version of Basin Street Blues, that is still embued with Jarretts distinctive touch and phrasing. Bye Bye Blackird is a wonderful performance, that I have listened to over and over.

This album was supposed to be a documentary recording only, and wasn't originally planned for release, but as Jarrett says in the sleeve notes "I think that you can hear on this tape, what jazz is all about".

It is a little different from the standards trio, because its Paul Motian. However Motian played with Monk, Bill Evans and a multitude of other Jazz giants, so the standard of drumming couldn't be much higher!
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Jazz at Its Finest 20 July 2009
By Karl W. Nehring - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Keith Jarrett has made many trio recordings over the past few years with bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette, but on this CD, Paul Motian, who played drums with Jarrett in the 70s, adds his own signature style to the group as DeJohnette takes the night off. This is a live recording made at--you guessed it!--the Deer Head Inn in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Jarrett's birthplace. The crowd that night was in for a real treat, as is anyone who buys this CD. The only potential negative is Jarrett's humming--it doesn't bother me, but it drives some folks right up the wall. But oh, the playing, and the interplay among the three musicians! This is the jazz trio at its finest, in a live setting: what more can you want? Bass is just a bit reticent, but other than that, the recording quality is excellent.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
something light from the maestro 29 May 2012
By Lance B. Sjogren - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is nightclub jazz standards music that you might call "light" material from a standpoint of Keith Jarrett's overall body of work. That word maybe applies in a couple of respects- first of all the melodies are fairly simple and secondly the playing is somewhat austere.

Just because it's light doesn't mean it isn't good. It is really good.

It does not have the intense or lengthy solos of much of Jarrett's work, but it is just basic jazz songs played very beautifully at a basic level. Now that I think about it, I believe it was to create exactly that sort of music that motivated the standards trio to be created in the first place.

Someone who complains that Jarrett's music doesn't "swing" would probably find this album to their liking.

Seems like a very fitting set for him to have played in his hometown.
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Don't miss Flying p.1 23 Oct. 2001
By Milan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
There are some mistakes in reviews. I think its because some peoples reviewed album "In deer head inn" instead this (which is the only album where played Motian and not DeJohnette). I want say just one thing: if you love music do not miss this one. Flying part I is maybe the best thing which this folks find in non standards ways. Pure geniality. IMHO.
11 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Superb Outing...needs to be available again 27 Oct. 2002
By Geoffrey P. Smith - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Keith Jarrett, in his note about this session included in the liner, says that he hopes listeners get an appreciation of what jazz is all about on this live recording on a misty night in Allentown, PA, sometime back in the early to mid nineties. Given the large number of Jarrett trio recordings to choose from, starting in the early 80's, I find it amusing/ironic that my favorite is this VERY relaxed, spacious recording with PAUL MOTIAN on the drums, sitting in place of Jack DeJohnette on this one occasion. I never tire of this one, and the variety of material, as well as the generous performances give me no end of pleasure. Motian swings hard in an unobtrusive fashion, and Jarrett really seems to be enjoying being back on home turf. Gary Peacock is, as always, excellent. With a bewildering array of recordings to choose from, including Jarrett's own trio, I think this is an excellent place to start listening to the modern piano trio...if this is what jazz is about, count me in!
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Feedback